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• V. Or 







®l)c alommonwcaltl) of itta0sacl)U0dt0 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1920 



RELATING TO THE 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS AND THE REGISTRY OF 

MOTOR VEHICLES 







I 

BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 

1922 



Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



K V 



&t)e dommontxjealtt) of Jfta00acl)U0etts 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts. 

Pursuant to the provisions of law, I have the honor as Com- 
missioner of Public Works to submit the first annual report of 
the Department of Public Works for the fiscal year ending 
Nov. 30, 1920. 

The divisions created by law to cover the activities of the 
Department have been organized in accordance with chapter 
350 of the General Acts of 1919, which provided as follows: — 

Section 111. The Massachusetts highway commission, existing under 
authority of chapter three hundred and forty-four of the General Acts of 
nineteen hundred and seventeen and acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto, and the commission on waterways and public lands 
existing under authority of chapter two hundred and eighty-eight of the 
General Acts of nineteen hundred and sixteen, are hereby abolished. All 
the rights, powers, duties and obligations of said commissions are hereby 
transferred to and shall hereafter be exercised and performed by the de- 
partment of public works established by this act, which shall be the lawful 
successor of said commissions. 

Section 112. The department of public works shall be under the 
supervision and control of a commissioner, to be known as commissioner 
of public works, and four associate commissioners, all of whom shall be 
appointed by the governor, with the advice and consent of the council. 
The commissioner shall be appointed for the term of three years. Of the 
associate commissioners first appointed, two shall be appointed for the 
term of one year and two for the term of two years. Thereafter as the 
terms expire the governor shall appoint the commissioner and the associate 
commissioners for the term of three years, shall fill any vacancy for the 
unexpired term, and may, with the consent of the council, remove the 
commissioner or any of the associate commissioners. The commissioner 
shall receive such annual salary, not exceeding seven thousand five hun- 
dred dollars, and the associate commissioners such annual salaries not 
exceeding six thousand dollars, as the governor and council may determine. 

Section 113. The department shall be organized in two divisions, 
namely, a division of highways and a division of waterways and public 



4 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

lands. The said divisions shall have, exercise and perform, the rights, 
powers, duties and obligations, respectively, of the Massachusetts highway 
commission and the commission on waterways and public lands, except as 
is otherwise provided herein. The governor shall, at the time of making 
the first appointments under the preceding section, designate two of the 
associate commissioners to have charge of the division of highways and 
two to have charge of the division of waterways and public lands. There- 
after, whenever a change in the associate commissioners occurs, the gov- 
ernor may make a new designation. The commissioner shall be entitled 
to act as a member of both divisions, and when present shall act as chair- 
man of the division. The concurrence of two members shall be necessary 
in any official act of either division. 

Section 114. The commissioner shall be the executive and adminis- 
trative head of the department. He shall approve all contracts made by 
either division, and may require any of the expenditures of either division 
to be submitted to him for approval. He may, subject to the civil sendee 
law and rules, where they apply, appoint, assign to divisions, transfer and 
remove such officials and employees as the work of the department may 
require, and, subject to the provisions of chapter two hundred and twenty- 
eight of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen, and the rules 
and regulations made thereunder, and to the approval of the governor and 
council where that is required by law, fix the compensation of the said 
persons. 

Section 115. The commissioner shall appoint, and may remove, 
subject to the approval of the governor and council, an official to be 
known as registrar of motor vehicles, and may, with like approval, fix his 
compensation. The registrar of motor vehicles shall have, exercise and 
perform all the rights, powers, duties and obligations of the Massachusetts 
highway commission relative to motor vehicles and to the operation there- 
of, as defined by chapter five hundred and thirty-four of the acts of nine- 
teen hundred and nine, and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto. Any person aggrieved by a regulation, ruling or decision of said 
registrar may, within ten days thereafter, appeal from such regulation, 
ruling or decision to the commissioners of the division of highways who 
may, after a hearing, order such regulation, ruling or decision to be affirmed, 
modified or annulled. 

Section 116. All rules and regulations under provisions of existing 
law within the jurisdiction of the division of highways, the division of 
waterways and public lands or the registrar of motor vehicles shall be 
drafted by the commissioners having charge of said divisions or by said 
registrar, shall be submitted to the commissioner and associate commis- 
sioners sitting as a board, and shall take effect, subject to the provisions 
of chapter three hundred and seven of the General Acts of nineteen hun- 
dred and seventeen, when approved by them, and at such time as they 
shall designate. Said board shall also have power to make all needful 
rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions of this act relating 
to the said department. 



HIGHWAYS. 5 

Under the terms of the act the following original appoint- 
ments were made : ■ — 

Commissioner of Public Works, for three years, John N. Cole. 

Division of Highways. 
Associate Commissioner, for one year, Frank D. Kemp. 
Associate Commissioner, for two years, James W. Synan. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Associate Commissioner, for one year, Jesse B. Baxter. 
Associate Commissioner, for two years, Richard K. Hale. 

In the reorganization, changes in personnel and changes in 
the work assigned to different employees have resulted in a co- 
ordination of work that is believed to promise greatly increased 
efficiency in handling the duties and responsibilities of the De- 
partment. In carrying out the work of reorganization the 
following assignments have been made : ■ — 

Executive Secretary for the Department, Frederick N. Wales. 

Division of Highways. 

Chief Engineer, Arthur W. Dean. 
Construction Engineer, Franklin C. Pillsbury. 
District Engineers : — 

District No. 1, Berkshire County, George A. Curtis. 

District No. 2, Franklin and Hampshire counties, H. D. Phillips. 

District No. 3, Hampden and Worcester counties, John A. Johnston. 

District No. 4, Middlesex County, F. D. Sabin. 

District No. 5, Essex and Suffolk counties, D. H. Dickinson. 

District No. 6, Norfolk and Bristol counties, R. W. Coburn. 

District No. 7, Plymouth, Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket counties, 
George H. Delano. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Mary A. Riley. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Fred Fair. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Chief Engineer, Frank W. Hodgdon. 

Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for Boston Harbor, John N. Ferguson. 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for harbors and waterways outside 
Boston Harbor, Francis L. Sellew. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Recording Secretary for the Division, Edna F. Townsend. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Cora I. Allen. 

Bridge Engineer for the Department, William F. Williams. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

Registrar, Frank A. Goodwin. 

Chief Clerk, Charles R. Gilley. 

Chief of Inspection Force, Albert S. Olsson. 

A detailed report is presented herewith, covering the activi- 
ties for the year of the Division of Highways and the Registry 
of Motor Vehicles. 

JOHN N. COLE, 

Commissioner. 



HIGHWAYS. 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS. 



x\PPROPRIATIONS. 

The appropriations for the construction and repair of State 
highways during the period 1903 to 1919, inclusive, were — 

1903 $2,250,000 00 1 

1907 2,500,000 00 * 

1912 5,000,000 00 1 

1919 4,000,000 00 2 



Total $13,750,000 00 

The total of such appropriations during the period 1894 to 
Nov. 30, 1919, inclusive, was $18,250,000. 

The appropriations for maintenance during the period 1914 
to 1919, inclusive, paid from the treasury of the Common- 
wealth, were — 

1914 $350,000 00 3 

1915 350,000 00 3 

1916 415,000 00 3 

1917 404,547 86 3 

1918 258,462 80 

1919 312,524 64 



Total $2,090,535 30 

The total of such appropriations during the period 1903 to 
Nov. 30, 1919, inclusive, was $3,604,701.96. 

The appropriations made in 1920 and relating to the Depart- 
ment of Public Works, Division of Highways, are included in 
various items in chapters 225 and 629, Acts of 1920, and also 
set forth in chapter 572, Acts of 1920, as follows: — 

1 To cover expense of construction for a period of five years. 

2 To cover expense of construction for a period of four years, 1920-23, inclusive. 

3 Includes appropriations for widening. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Chapter 225, Acts of 1020, making Appropriations for the 
Maintenance of Departments, Boards, Commissions, Insti- 
tutions and Certain Activities of the Commonwealth, for 
Interest, Sinking Fund, and Serial Bond Requirements, and 
for Certain Permanent Improvements. 

Service of the Department of Public Works. 
Item 

587 For the salaries of the commissioner and the four associate 

commissioners, a sum not exceeding .... $30,500 00 

587^ For personal services of clerks and assistants to the commis- 
sioner, a sum not exceeding ...... 9,000 00 

Division of Highways (the following appropriations for 
the operation and maintenance of this division are 
made from the receipts of the Motor Vehicle Fees 
Fund) : 

588 For the personal services of the chief engineer, engineers and 

office assistants, including certain clerks and stenographers, 

a sum not exceeding ....... 40,000 00 

589 For travelling expenses of the commissioners, when travelling 

in the discharge of their official duties, a sum not exceeding 3,500 00 

590 For services other than personal, including printing the annual 

report and necessary office supplies and equipment, a sum 

not exceeding 12,000 00 

591 For the care, repair and storage, replacement and purchase 

of road-building machinery and tools, a sum not exceeding 375,000 00 

592 For the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths on state 

highways, a sum not exceeding ..... 13,000 00 

593 For the maintenance of state highways and the improvement 

and construction of town ways and certain through routes, 
in accordance with the provisions of existing laws, and for 
the payment of any claims for damages occurring on state 
highways, with the approval of the attorney-general, a sum 
not exceeding two million five hundred fifty-seven thousand 
seven hundred sixty dollars and fifty-six cents from receipts 
in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund, and in addition thereto the 
sum of three hundred fifty-eight thousand eight hundred 
eighty-nine dollars and forty-four cents, representing the 
amount received in the treasury from assessments on cities 
and towns for the maintenance of state highways . . 2,916,650 00 

594 For the maintenance and operation of the Newburyport bridge 

and the Brightman street bridge in Fall River, in accordance 
with the provisions of existing laws, a sum not exceeding . 18,000 00 

597 For the purpose of enabling the department of public works to 
secure federal aid for the construction of highways, a sum 
not exceeding one million dollars in addition to any other 
funds which the department has available for the purpose; 
of the said sum two hundred thousand dollars shall be pay- 
able from receipts from counties for assessments on highways 
previously constructed, and the balance from the general 
fund 1,000,000 00 



HIGHWAYS. 9 



Chapter 629, Acts of 1920, in Addition to the General Appropri- 
ation Act making Appropriations to supplement Certain 
Items therein, and for Certain New Activities and Projects. 

Service of the Department of Public Works. 
Item 

587 For the salaries of the commissioner and the four associate com- 

missioners, a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, the 
same to be in addition to the appropriation heretofore made 
for the purpose ........ $500 00 

Division of Highways. 

588 For the personal services of the chief engineer, engineers and 

office assistants, a sum not exceeding .... 900 00 

594 For the maintenance and operation of the Newburyport 
bridge and the Brightman street bridge in Fall River, a 
sum not exceeding ....... 680 00 

Severally to be in addition to any appropriations heretofore 
made for the purpose, and to be paid from the receipts from 
motor vehicle fees. 
594 j For the care of snow on highways as provided by chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the present year, 
a sum not exceeding fifty thousand dollars, the same to be 
paid from the receipts from motor vehicle fees . . . 50,000 00 

594^ For the state's proportion of the expenses authorized for 
special highway improvement under the provisions of 
certain special acts of the present year, a sum not exceeding 
eighty-five thousand dollars, to be paid from the receipts 
from motor vehicle fees, provided that any contributions 
from counties, cities, towns and individuals required by the 
said special acts, shall be credited to the account, with 
the appropriation for the state's proportion when the said 
contributions are paid into the state treasury, and shall be 
used in accordance with the provisions of the said acts; 
and the highway division is hereby authorized to expend, 
without further appropriation, any money contributed by 
the counties, cities and towns of the commonwealth and to 
make expenditures in anticipation of assessments to be 
levied upon any counties, cities and towns, for the improve- 
ment of highways under chapters five hundred and nineteen, 
five hundred and twenty, five hundred and twenty-one, five 
hundred and twenty- two, five hundred and thirty-six, five 
hundred and sixty-six and five hundred and seventy-one of 
the acts of the present year. Any unexpended balance of 
these special funds may be used in the succeeding year for 
the same purpose . . . . . . . . 85,000 00 

Deficiencies. 
For deficiencies in certain appropriations of previous years in 
certain items as follows: 

Division of Public Works. 

For maintenance and operation of the Somerset and Newbury- 
port bridges, the sum of ...... 182 24 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Chapter 572, Acts of 1920, section 1, authorizes the Division 
to expend an additional sum of $1,000,000 before Nov. 30, 1924, 
for the purpose of completing the construction of certain high- 
ways in the five western counties of the State under the pro- 
visions of chapter 221, General Acts of 1915. 

Expenditures. 

Summary of expenditures by the Division during the fiscal 
year ending Nov. 30, 1920: — 



For construction of State highways, under chapter 344, 
General Acts of 1917, Part 1 

For maintenance of State highways, from Motor Vehicle 
Fees Fund, under chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, 
Part 1, and chapter 225, Acts of 1920, item 593 

For maintenance of State highways from revenue appro- 
priations, under chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, 
Part 1, and chapter 225, Acts of 1920, item 593 

For maintenance and improvement of town and county 
ways, under chapter 525, Acts of 1910 . 

For construction and repair of ways in certain towns, under 
chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 23 

For highways in the five western counties, under chapter 
221, General Acts of 1915, chapter 225, Acts of 1920, 
and chapter 572, Acts of 1920 

For repair and improvement of public ways, exclusive of 
State highways, in certain towns, under chapter 155, 
General Acts of 1918 

For the construction of a State highway in Hingham, under 
chapter 213, General Acts of 1916 .... 

For the improvement of Prospect Street in Leominster 
under chapter 236, General Acts of 1918 . 

For the improvement of Prospect Street in Leominster 
under chapter 231, Special Acts of 1919 . 

For the construction and improvement of a highway in 
Holland and Brimfield, under chapter 232, Special Acts 
of 1919 

For the improvement of a highway between Holden and 
the Wachusett Mountain State Reservation, under chap- 
ter 233, Special Acts of 1919 

For the improvement of a highway in Middlefield, lead- 
ing from Chester to Worthington, under chapter 240, 
Special Acts of 1919 

For the improvement of a highway between West- 
borough and Grafton, under chapter 335, General Acts 
of 1919 



$1,410,478 33 

1,621,332 10 

358,889 44 

518,396 47 

65,475 47 

212,443 77 

229,950 57 
4,919 86 
4,695 16 
5,778 55 

5,392 35 

25,852 57 

7,113 73 

4,000 00 



HIGHWAYS. 11 

For the construction of a highway in North Brookfield, 
leading to New Braintree, under chapter 336, General 
Acts of 1919 $16,531 10 

For the further improvement of a highway in Hubbardston 

and Rutland, under chapter 337, General Acts of 1919 27,954 64 

For the construction of a State highway in Holyoke, under 
chapter 338, General Acts of 1919 1,488 28 

For the improvement of a highway leading from Milford 
to Southborough through Hopkinton, under chapter 
339, General Acts of 1919 7,354 25 

For investigation relative to the construction of a State 
highway in Williamstown, under chapter 62, Resolves 
of 1919 82 70 

For the improvement of a highway in Clinton, under chap- 
ter 520, Acts of 1920, and chapter 629, Acts of 1920, sec- 
tion 2, item 594£ 127 75 

For the improvement of a highway in Holden, under chap- 
ter 521, Acts of 1920, and chapter 629, Acts of 1920, 
item 594^ 385 66 

For the improvement of a highway in Templeton, under 
chapter 522, Acts of 1920, and chapter 629, Acts of 1920, 
item 594^ 5,905 48 

For the construction of a highway in Chester, Middlefield, 
Peru and Hinsdale, under chapter 566, Acts of 1920, and 
chapter 629, Acts of 1920, item 594^ 318 94 

For the care of snow on highways, under chapter 488, Acts 
of 1920, and chapter 629, Acts of 1920, item 594| . . 18,923 00 

For the maintenance and operation of the bridge over 
Merrimack River between Newburyport and Salisbury, 
under chapter 716, Acts of 1912, and chapter 225, Acts 
of 1920, item 594 7,957 60 

For the maintenance and operation of the bridge over 
Taunton Great River at Brightman Street in Fall River, 
under chapter 717, Acts of 1912, and chapter 225, Acts 
of 1920, item 594, 8,068 19 

For the care, repair and storage, replacement and purchase 
of road-building machinery and tools, under chapter 
225, Acts of 1920, item 591 333,441 58 

For the suppression of gypsy and brown-tail moths on 
State highways, under chapter 225, Acts of 1920, item 
592 13,000 00 

General expenses, under chapter 225, Acts of 1920, items 
588, 589, 590 55,739 33 

Under highway trust fund, in town of Sandwich . . . 7,450 47 



Total, ...... $4,979,447 34 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Co-operative Work — Supervision of Expenditures. 
The Division has supervised the expenditure, during the year, 
by cities, towns and counties, under chapter 525, Acts of 1910, 
chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, and chapter 155, 
General Acts of 1918, of approximately $1,220,987.57 for co- 
operative work, in repairing, maintaining and improving cer- 
tain public ways, and for other road work for which the towns 
and cities made contributions. All such work was carried out 
in conformity with contracts, specifications and plans approved 
by the Division. 

Petitions, Meetings and Hearings. 

In addition to the regular weekly meetings of the Division 
throughout the year, numerous hearings and conferences have 
been held, including the annual meeting and hearing in the 
several counties in the Commonwealth, for the open discussion 
of questions relative to the public ways, as required by chapter 
344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 2; hearings on peti- 
tions for the relocation or extension of street railway tracks on 
State Highways in Boston, Blackstone, Easton, Lawrence, 
Methuen, Northbridge, Somerset and Shrewsbury; on appeals 
from action taken by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles on revo- 
cation of certain licenses to operate motor vehicles; on the 
subject of removal of snow from highways; on the matter of 
billboard advertising; and on appeal from action taken by the 
town of Avon changing the name of a certain street. 

Petitions were received and contracts signed during the year, 
as follows : — 





Petitions. Contracts. 


Work under chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 23 
Work under chapter 155, General Acts of 1918 .... 


13 

79 
27 
99 


29 

112 

27 

98 


Totals 


218 


266 



HIGHWAYS. 13 



GENERAL STATEMENT AS TO SURVEYS, PLANS, ESTIMATES 
AND OTHER WORK DURING THE YEAR. 

Preliminary surveys, plans and estimates were made on con- 
templated State highways in 34 towns, covering an aggregate 
distance of 61.03 miles. Lines and grade for construction work 
on State highways were made in 30 towns, covering an aggre- 
gate distance of 53.04 miles, and for resurfacing work in 7 
towns, covering an aggregate distance of 7.60 miles. 

Final surveys were made on completed State highways in 16 
towns, covering an aggregate distance of 17.74 miles, and on 
roads other than State highways in 24 towns, covering an aggre- 
gate distance of 22.84 miles. 

On "small town" and Motor Vehicle Fees Fund work, pre- 
liminary surveys, including plans and profiles, were made in 
34 towns, covering an aggregate distance of 24.54 miles. Lines 
and grade for construction have been made on these roads in 
47 towns, covering an aggregate distance of 37.20 miles. In 
addition to the above, surveys have been made in 5 towns, 
covering an aggregate distance of 3.16 miles, said roads to be 
constructed by the towns; and lines and grade for construction 
for this class have been made in 3 towns, covering an aggregate 
distance of .97 mile. 

In connection with work in the five western counties of the 
State surveys have been made in 1 town, covering an aggre- 
gate distance of .45 mile, and lines and grade for construction 
have been made in 4 towns, covering an aggregate distance of 
8.13 miles. 

Layout plans have been made in 24 towns, covering an aggre- 
gate distance of 42.17 miles. 

Plans to accompany decrees for street railway locations on 
State highways have been made in 7 towns. 

Special surveys, plans, etc., have been made in 15 towns, 
covering an aggregate distance of 17.37 miles; and lines and 
grade for construction have been made in 9 towns, covering an 
aggregate distance of 7.06 miles. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



State Highway Construction. 

Construction has been completed during the year ending 
Nov. 30, 1920, on about 22.4 miles of State highway, portions 
of which were laid out in 1919. Construction was commenced, 
but not completed, on over 22 miles of road in 11 cities and 
towns. Layouts were made of about 42.17 miles of State high- 
way in 24 cities and towns. The total length of State highways 
at the end of the year was 1,353.96 miles. 

Trees on State Highways. 

During the last sixteen years 44,720 trees have been planted 
on the borders of State highways, of which 590 were planted 
during the year covered by this report, the Division continuing 
the policy of planting quick-growing trees and hedges to re- 
place guard rails. 

Permits. 

There were 1,117 permits issued during the year for opening 
or occupying state highways. 

Highways. 

In addition to the 22.40 miles of State highway, construction 
was completed on 11.83 miles of highways under the provisions 
of the "small town" act (chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, 
Part 1, section 23); 52.09 miles of highways under chapter 525, 
Acts of 1910; and 34.92 miles of highways under other acts, 
making a total of 121.24 miles. 

Of the above highways, .77 of a mile was of water-bound 
macadam; 39.54 miles of gravel; 6.08 miles of sand bound with 
asphalt; 38.04 miles of bituminous macadam, that is, macadam 
with bituminous binder incorporated in the top course; 5.06 
miles of water-bound macadam with an oil or tar surface ap- 
plied; 5.93 miles of crushed gravel with the top surface bound 
with asphalt; 16.40 miles of cement concrete; 4.65 miles of 
gravel with an oil surface applied; and 4.76 miles were earth 
highways, that is, surfaced with the best available material. 



HIGHWAYS. 15 



Resurfacing and Widening. 

During the year 27.41 miles of State highway were resur- 
faced; 2.43 miles widened but not resurfaced; and 14.94 miles 
widened and resurfaced. The total mileage represents com- 
pleted work. 

Engineering Advice to Municipal Authorities. 

The Division furnished, without charge, engineering advice 
to 28 cities and towns in the Commonwealth, in accordance 
with the provisions of chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, 
Part 1, section 2. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



STATE HIGHWAYS. 

Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 5, provides 
that — 

If the county commissioners of a county, the mayor and aldermen of 
a city or the selectmen of a town adjudge that the public necessity and 
convenience require that the commonwealth lay out and take charge of 
a new or an existing way as a highway in whole or in part, in their county, 
city or town, they may apply by a petition in writing to the [Massachu- 
setts Highway] commission, requesting that said way be laid out and 
taken charge of by the commonwealth. 

Petitions under chapter 344 aforesaid have been received as 
follows: — 

Selectmen of Great Barrington. Section of road leading from 
Sheffield to Great Barrington, beginning at the boundary between 
Great Barrington and Sheffield, at the northerly end of the State high- 
way already constructed in Sheffield and extending northerly about 
two miles. Received Dec. 16, 1919. 

Selectmen of Norwell. Section of road beginning at the boundary 
between Hingham and Norwell at Queen Ann Corners, and extending 
southeasterly to the boundary between Norwell and Hanover at Assi- 
nippi Village at the northwesterly end of the State highway already 
constructed in Hingham. Received Dec. 23, 1919. 

Selectmen of Hingham. Section of road locally known as Whiting 
Street, extending from the boundary between Weymouth and Hing- 
ham, to the boundary between Hingham and Norwell. Received 
Dec. 23, 1919. 

Selectmen of Huntington. Road beginning at the Worthington line 
and extending along the River road to Huntington Village, thence 
southwesterly to the State highway leading from Chester to Russell. 
Received April 20, 1920. Layout was made May 11, 1920, and con- 
tract entered into. 

Selectmen of Winchendon. The main road leading northerly from 
Winchendon Village and extending to the New Hampshire line at a 
point westerly of the tracks of the Boston & Maine Railroad. Re- 
ceived Jan. 21, 1920. 

Selectmen of Natick. Worcester Street extending from the boundary 
between Natick and Wellesley to the boundary between Natick and 
Framingham, about four miles in length. Received Dec. 29, 1919. 

Mayor and Aldermen of Medford. Road leading from South Street 
to the Medford-Winchester line, and known as Winthrop Street. 
Received Jan. 9, 1920. 




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HIGHWAYS. 



17 



Selectmen of Lexington. Road beginning at Lowell Street, at its 
intersection with the present State highway, known as Summer Street 
Extension; thence northerly on Lowell Street to Maple Street; thence 
on Maple Street to Massachusetts Avenue; thence on Massachusetts 
Avenue to Middle Street, the present State highway. Received Jan. 
10, 1920. 

Selectmen of Acushnet. Road leading from Acushnet Village north 
to Long Plain Village in Acushnet. Received Feb. 4, 1920. 

Selectmen of Shrewsbury. Road leading from the junction of Maple 
Avenue and Boston Turnpike, said junction being about one mile 
easterly from the Worcester-Shrewsbury line; thence along said 
Turnpike to Shrewsbury-Northborough line. Received Feb. 4, 1920. 

Mayor and Aldermen of Lawrence. Road leading from the junction 
of Andover Street and the Salem Turnpike at Wilson's Corner; thence 
northwesterly along said turnpike in the town of North Andover to 
and along Winthrop Avenue to South Union Street. Received July 
13, 1920. 

County Commissioners of Barnstable County. Road leading from 
the existing State highway in Provincetown, in part over a new loca- 
tion to a point on Bradford Street about 200 feet easterly from the 
junction of Bradford and Allerton streets. Received Nov. 9, 1920. 
Layout was made Nov. 9, 1920. No contract has been entered into. 

County Commissioners of Worcester County. A road leading from 
the junction of the Brookfield road and Main Street in East Brook- 
field to the westerly end of the existing State highway, on the Spencer 
road, so called. Received Nov. 20, 1920. 

The expenditures during the year in various counties for the 
construction of State highways were : — 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Bristol 
Essex . 
Franklin . 
Hampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Worcester . 



$33,446 59 
169,268 42 

52,637 96 
268,684 21 
156,538 99 
28 67 
203,392 71 
268,029 94 

28,496 67 
102,878 97 
127,075 20 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 



Barnstable County. 

Barnstable $31,789 29 

Mashpee 196 72 

Provincetown 1,263 84 

Sandwich 196 74 

Berkshire County. 

Clarksburg 9 10 

Dalton 4,194 23 

Egremont 47,314 80 

Great Barrington 12,35911 

Lanesborough 37,944 16 

Pittsfield 4 55 

Sheffield . 11,714 68 

Stockbridge 4 55 

Windsor . 55,723 24 

Bristol County. 

Acushnet 88 73 

Fairhaven 98 64 

Freetown 9,700 54 

Taunton 42,750 05 

Essex County. 

Andover 5,697 28 

Danvers 57,714 51 

Lynnfield 18,199 31 

Peabody 77,321 93 

Saugus 109,751 18 

Franklin County. 

Greenfield 109,755 57 

Northfield 12,123 78 

Shelburne 34,659 64 

Hampden County. 

Blandford 28 67 

Hampshire County. 

Amherst 16,845 96 

Cummington 45,109 66 

Huntington 70,287 91 

Northampton . 124 44 

Ware 71,024 74 



HIGHWAYS. 



19 



Middlesex County. 

Ashby $6,361 82 

Billerica 117,846 63 

Groton 19,527 69 

Lexington 6,176 22 

Littleton 89,150 51 

Lowell 5 89 

Wayland 21,442 38 

Woburn 7,518 80 

Norfolk County. 

Braintree 28,496 67 

Plymouth County. 

Hingham 39,459 02 

Norwell 50,220 57 

Wareham 13,199 38 

Worcester County. 

Athol 7,750 18 

Barre 3,215 77 

Charlton 30,120 75 

Leicester 1Q,176 04 

Northbridge 38,900 38 

Oxford 4,678 02 

Petersham 29,898 61 

Rutland 58 12 

Uxbridge 13 30 

Warren 2,264 03 

Total $1,410,478 33 



Construction and Resurfacing of State Highways. 

(Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1.) 

The following contracts were entered into during the year 
for the construction and resurfacing of State highways in various 
municipalities : — 

Acton-Littleton. 

July 6, 1920, contract made with George E. Greenough of 
Acton for the construction of 2.18 miles of State highway, con- 
sisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $98,874. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 98 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $97,592.97. 

Andover. 

Aug. 31, 1920, contract 1 made with George T. Seabury, Inc., 
of Providence, R. I., for the construction of 869 feet of State 
highway, and 1,682 feet of town road, consisting of bituminous 
macadam 21 to 24 feet wide. The proposal amounted to 
$39,757. 

Work completed Nov. 16, 1920. 

Expenditure during 1920, $39,406.64. 

Attleboro. 

April 6, 1920, contract made with the Lane Construction 
Corporation of Meriden, Conn., for the surfacing of 7,382 feet 
of State highway, consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $28,178. 

Work completed July 20, 1920. 

Expenditure during 1920, $31,146.47. 

Barre. 

Oct. 26, 1920, contract made with G. Louis Burnham Com- 
pany of Bristol, Conn., for the construction of 1,239 feet of 
State highway, this contract providing only for grading and 
drainage. The proposal amounted to $4,461.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 55 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $2,826.65. 

Billerica. 

April 28, 1920, contract made with James H. Fannon of 
Somerville for the construction of 3,168 feet of State highway 
of concrete construction, and a reinforced concrete bridge across 
Concord River. The proposal amounted to $123,241.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 95 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $103,586.76. 

1 Subsequently assigned to the Lane Construction Corporation of Meriden, Conn. 



HIGHWAYS. 21 



Danvers-Peabody. 

April 6, 1920, contract made with Hamlin & Nelson of Salem 
for the construction of 3,070 feet of State highway on Andover 
Street in Danvers and 2,777 feet in Peabody, consisting of 
bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to 
$43,922.50. 

Work practically completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $38,278.73. 

Eastham-Wellfleet. 

May 11, 1920, contract made with Thomas & Murphy of 
Keene, N. H., for the surfacing of 10.69 miles of State high- 
way, consisting of bituminous concrete 18 feet wide. The pro- 
posal amounted to $166,047. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 90 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $147,365.69. 

Egremont. 

June 29, 1920, contract made with the Lanesborough Corpo- 
ration of Meriden, Conn., for the construction of 6,147 feet of 
State highway, consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. 
The proposal amounted to $39,783.50. 

Work completed Nov. 30, 1920. 

Expenditure during 1920, $41,589.54. 

Huntington. 

May 11, 1920, contract made with Cordner & Montague of 
Springfield for the construction of 16,300 feet of State highway, 
consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide, and a rein- 
forced concrete bridge across Westfield River. The proposal 
amounted to $182,232. 

Work completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $61,782.82. 

Leicester. 
April 13, 1920, contract made with McGuire & McGourty, 
Inc., of Worcester for surfacing 6,100 feet of State highway, 



22 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

consisting of cement concrete 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $44,601.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 90 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $30,972.86. 

Aug. 10, 1920, contract made with John MacDonald Con- 
struction Company of Boston for the construction of 3,300 
feet of State highway, consisting of cement concrete 24 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $51,731. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 40 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $8,944.70. 

Littleton. 

April 20, 1920, contract made with the Framingham Con- 
struction and Supply Company for the construction of 1,212 
feet of State highway, consisting of bituminous macadam 18 
feet wide. The proposal amounted to $8,630. 

Work completed July 6, 1920. 

Expended during 1920, $9,703.89. 

Littleton-Groton. 

Dec. 23, 1919, contract made with John W. Duff, Incorpo- 
rated, of Boston for the construction of 13,879 feet of State 
highway, consisting of cement concrete surface 18 feet wide in 
Littleton, and 20,389 feet in Groton. The proposal amounted 
to $246,131.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 35 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expended during 1920, $85,823.86. 

Oxford. 

Oct. 26, 1920, contract made with the Hassam Paving Com- 
pany of Worcester for the construction of 5,000 feet of State 
highway, consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $41,440. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 10 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expended during 1920, $4,111.96. 



HIGHWAYS. 23 



Saugus-Lynnfield-Peabody-Danvers (Newburyport Turnpike). 

May 24, 1920, contract made with the Hassam Paving 
Company of Worcester for the construction of 27,022 feet of 
State highway (Newburyport Turnpike), consisting of cement 
concrete 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $229,098.40. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 40 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $86,171.36. 

Shrewsbury. 

Oct. 13, 1920, contract made with Alexander Palladino of 
Newton for the surfacing of 700 feet of State highway, consist- 
ing of bituminous macadam, there being two roadways, each 
20 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $9,413.50. 

Work practically completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $7,026.45. 

Ware. 

April 28, 1920, contract made with Luigi C. Carchia of 
Boston for the construction of 13,864 feet of State highway, 
consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $102,486.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 65 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $62,430.49. 

Wayland. 

April 6, 1920, contract made with John H. McCusker of 
Waltham for the construction of 1,800 feet of State highway, 
consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $13,370. 

Work completed July 20, 1920. 

Expenditure during 1920, $18,847.77. 

Westfield. 
Aug. 24, 1920, contract made with the Standard Engineering 
Company of Toledo, Ohio, for the reconstruction of the wooden 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



floor of the bridge across Little River, Westfield. The proposal 
amounted to $9,271.96. 

Work practically completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $52.63. 

Wobarn. 

Sept. 28, 1920, contract made with the city of Woburn for 
the construction of 8,240 feet of State highway, consisting of 
bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted 
to $48,413.50. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, about 25 per cent of the work had been 
completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $6,609. 

Maintenance of State Highways (from Motor Vehicle 

Fees Fund). 

(Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1; chapter 225, Acts of 1920.) 

The expenditures during the year in various counties were : — 



County. 


Amount. 




$236,345 31 




250,189 53 




131,460 54 




12,548 66 




87,820 07 




123,926 62 




35,044 02 




29,367 49 




301,513 80 




829 22 




72,059 16 




71,712 88 


Suffolk 


3,629 14 




263,247 73 



HIGHWAYS. 



25 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 



Barnstable County. 

Barnstable $5,820 51 

Bourne 1,918 45 

Brewster 1,410 57 

Chatham 2,194 01 

Dennis 1,373 30 

Eastham 112,317 17 

Falmouth 3,390 70 

Harwich 755 41 

Mashpee 589 02 

Orleans 1,333 11 

Provincetown 889 63 

Sandwich 3,414 11 

Truro 36,337 79 

Wellfleet 58,959 16 

Yarmouth 5,642 37 

Berkshire County, 

Adams 1,326 75 

Becket 46,734 80 

Cheshire 5,527 57 

Clarksburg 2,824 93 

Dalton 1,899 08 

Egremont 1,075 20 

Florida 15,084 53 

Great Barrington 1,811 41 

Hancock 66,301 02 

Hinsdale 1,262 02 

Lanesborough 1,177 81 

Lee 3,508 50 

Lenox 4,263 51 

North Adams 11,976 93 

Pittsfield : - 72,254 57 

Richmond 5,326 01 

Savoy 2,583 19 

Sheffield 2,120 12 

Stockbridge 1,358 51 

Washington 159 25 

Williamstown 514 92 

Windsor 1,098 90 

Bristol County. 

Acushnet 2,168 98 

Attleboro 42,253 50 

Berkley 880 56 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Dartmouth $4,100 56 

Dighton 2,118 90 

Easton 110 48 

Fairhaven 676 21 

Fall River 128 77 

Freetown 779 06 

Mansfield 1,410 73 

North Attleborough 3,238 97 

Norton 3,464 46 

Raynham 3,119 78 

Rehoboth 3,495 16 

Seekonk 35,959 91 

Somerset 4,661 89 

Swansea 13,705 96 

Taunton 3,144 86 

Westport * 6,041 80 

Dukes County. 

Chilmark 3,925 90 

Edgartown 1,543 46 

Gay Head 4,143 91 

Oak Bluffs 1,432 05 

Tisbury 279 73 

West Tisbury 1,223 61 

Essex County. 

Amesbury . 2,232 75 

Andover 3,396 95 

Beverly 2,003 88 

Danvers 154 48 

Essex 686 41 

Gloucester 1,671 99 

Groveland 2,098 53 

Hamilton 2,898 23 

Haverhill 6,385 67 

Ipswich 1,679 58 

Lawrence 1,111 85 

Lynn 1,699 99 

Merrimac 2,432 69 

Methuen . 5,638 26 

Middleton 252 30 

Newbury 2,116 63 

Newburyport 375 69 

North Andover 4,376 88 

Rockport 543 06 



HIGHWAYS. 



27 



Rowley $1,589 12 

Salem 809 97 

Salisbury 2,655 05 

Saugus 1,037 55 

Swampscott 532 00 

Wenham 34,452 57 

West Newbury 4,987 99 

Franklin County. 

Ashfield 1,698 88 

Bernardston 36,970 57 

Buckland 3,466 23 

Charlemont 13,015 37 

Colrain 2,602 70 

Conway 2,985 88 

Deerfield 5,540 37 

Erving 4,041 49 

Gill 108 29 

Greenfield 33,320 04 

Montague 3,082 03 

Northfield 6,214 22 

Orange 1,693 63 

Shelburne 7,474 58 

Sunderland 778 96 

Whately 933 38 

Hampden County. 

Agawam 340 64 

Blandford . 2,650 77 

Brimfield . 2,384 57 

Chester 3,841 35 

Chicopee 2,535 23 

East Longmeadow 1,105 83 

Holyoke 1,201 26 

Monson 508 58 

Palmer 6,764 02 

Russell 6,777 47 

Wales 1,594 63 

West Springfield 694 33 

Westfield 3,186 67 

Wilbraham 1,458 67 

Hampshire County. 

Amherst 2,901 91 

Belchertown 1,664 09 



28 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Cummington $466 23 

Easthampton 827 65 

Goshen 1,226 07 

Granby 3,952 22 

Hadley 2,152 74 

Hatfield 266 52 

Huntington 3,325 64 

Northampton 1,306 24 

South Hadley 4,010 80 

Southampton 527 68 

Ware 3,998 04 

Williamsburg 2,741 66 

Middlesex County. 

Acton 106,197 29 

Arlington 401 41 

Ashby 7,899 66 

Ashland 835 61 

Ayer 566 11 

Bedford 149 23 

Billerica 1,145 27 

Boxborough 1,809 76 

Burlington 3,121 95 

Chelmsford 8,838 21 

Concord 1,178 29 

Dracut 3,011 75 

Framingham 1,771 18 

Groton 250 66 

Holliston 1,586 21 

Hudson 435 66 

Lexington 1,543 66 

Lincoln 865 60 

Littleton 29,604 32 

Lowell 2,734 53 

Maiden 12 30 

Marlborough . 3,427 44 

Medford 309 67 

Melrose 354 04 

Natick 1,379 34 

Newton 351 30 

North Reading 1,502 14 

Pepperell 1,849 50 

Reading 2,265 40 

Shirley 244 03 

Somerville 325 76 



HIGHWAYS. 



29* 



Stoneham $31,950 30 

Sudbury 1,907 75 

Tewksbury 4,259 99 

Townsend 5,231 48 

Tyngsborough 3,465 53 

Watertown 542 79 

Wayland 1,962 69 

Westford 6,399 54 

Weston 1,1*8 22 

Wilmington 55,008 01 

Winchester 1,769 02 

Woburn 1,901 20 

Nantucket County. 

Nantucket 829 22 

Norfolk County. 

Avon 357 31 

Bellingham 892 80 

Braintree 1,196 15 

Canton 2,733 82 

Cohasset 3,338 04 

Dedham 1,466 46 

Dover 950 66 

Foxborough 1,357 54 

Franklin 954 80 

Holbrook 1,062 52 

Milton 576 58 

Needham 1,247 66 

Norfolk 1,734 09 

Norwood . -. 2,454 12 

Plainville 2,474 50 

Quincy 10,395 94 

Randolph 6,179 91 

Sharon 622 29 

Stoughton 9,261 68 

Walpole 5,029 11 

Wellesley 117 98 

Westwood 268 23 

Weymouth 11,652 73 

Wrentham 5,734 24 

Plymouth County. 

Abington 1,921 96* 

Bridgewater 3,753 lfr 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Brockton $548 08 

Duxbury 1,414 38 

EastBridgewater 5,113 39 

Hanover 1,205 75 

Hingham 2,930 39 

Kingston 548 94 

Lakeville 5,361 79 

Marion . 1,856 53 

Marshfield 10,471 02 

Mattapoisett 5,811 37 

Middleborough 13,803 06 

Pembroke 893 45 

Plymouth 1,113 17 

Rochester 2,160 43 

Rockland 1,430 69 

Scituate 1,305 21 

Wareham 5,636 64 

West Bridgewater 2,144 24 

Whitman 2,289 23 

Suffolk County. 

Boston 1,403 43 

Chelsea 274 99 

Revere 1,950 72 

Worcester County. 

Ashburnham 20,171 02 

Athol 1,813 85 

Auburn 2,928 57 

Barre 5,555 09 

Blackstone 1,888 21 

Brookfield 2,223 03 

Charlton 4,995 43 

Douglas 1,466 27 

Dudley 2,328 51 

Fitchburg 807 93 

Gardner ........... 2,322 82 

Grafton 3,883 00 

Hardwick 913 06 

Harvard 1,353 95 

Holden 2,864 15 

Hopedale 203 51 

Lancaster 1,052 03 

Leicester 38,817 24 

Leominster . 1,811 10 

Lunenburg 86,578 10 



HIGHWAYS. 31 

Mendon $482 42 

Milford 1,216 00 

Millbury 1,608 86 

MillviUe 1,301 62 

New Braintree 134 11 

North Brookfield 793 70 

Northborough 1,781 07 

Northbridge 753 09 

Oakham . 1,924 40 

Oxford 2,124 68 

Paxton 4,071 69 

Petersham 3,483 65 

Phillipston 517 63 

Princeton 1,126 66 

Rutland 3,366 62 

Shrewsbury 9,424 42 

Southborough 1,619 31 

Southbridge 216 78 

Spencer 883 76 

Sterling 2,726 42 

Sturbridge 1,234 78 

Sutton 3,302 82 

Templeton 5,567 62 

Upton 1,639 84 r 

Uxbridge 2,429 53 

Warren 763 63 

Webster 807 18 

West Boylston 765 29 

West Brookfield 1,603 50 

Westborough 2,433 65 

Westminster 5,765 14 

Winchendon 11,466 45 

Worcester 1,934 54 

Total, l $1,619,694 17 

1 To this amount should be added items totalling $1,637.93 for marking routes, and for tar 
and oil analysis, etc. 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Maintenance of State Highways (from Revenue 
Appropriations) . 

(Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1; chapter 225, Acts of 1920.) 

The expenditures during the year in various counties were : 



County. 

Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Suffolk 

Worcester 



Amount. 



$28,010 24 
32,322 68 
32,809 71 

4,662 97 
50,495 54 
16,125 00 
16,009 76 
11,070 18 
54,756 05 

4,130 91 
23,395 22 
16,438 18 

3,445 53 
65,217 47 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow : — 

Barnstable County. 

Barnstable $3,704 87 

Bourne 2,171 39 

Brewster 1,319 08 

Chatham 2,178 42 

Dennis 1,694 68 

Eastham 1,312 10 

Falmouth 3,709 63 

Harwich 1,055 36 

Mashpee 591 36 

Orleans 1,053 75 

Provincetown 1,526 39 

Sandwich 1,749 10 

Truro 2,182 54 

WeUfleet 1,886 19 

Yarmouth, North 1 i «7^ 38 
Yarmouth, South/ 



HIGHWAYS. 



33 



Berkshire County. 



Adams . 

Becket . 

Cheshire 

Clarksburg . 

Dalton . 

Egremont 

Florida . 

Great Barrington 

Hancock 

Hinsdale 

Lanesborough 

Lee . 

Lenox 

New Marlborough 

North Adams 

Pittsfield 

Richmond 

Savoy 

Sheffield . 

Stockbridge 

Williamstown 

Windsor . 



Acushnet 

Attleboro 

Berkley . 

Dartmouth 

Dighton . 

Easton . 

Fairhaven 

Fall River 

Freetown 

Mansfield 

North Attleborough 

Norton . 

Raynham 

Rehoboth 

Seekonk . 

Somerset 

Swansea . 

Taunton 

Westport 



Bristol County. 



$311 41 


1,664 86 


1,222 21 


569 84 


720 41 


1,383 66 


7,223 95 


2,296 99 


179 54 


429 18 


365 74 


2,800 98 


1,68'8 63 


59 30 


4,831 14 


1.395 53 


783 50 


511 38 


1,592 85 


1,853 09 


288 49 


150 00 


998 04 


1,462 00 


427 81 


2,903 09 


1,134 90 


184 11 


489 55 


272 22 


159 41 


2,831 92 


1,749 98 


1,408 79 


1,677 76 


1,563 78 


4,087 38 


7,815 23 


1,554 89 


2,088 85 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Dukes Countv. 



Chilmark 
Edgartown 
Gay Head 
Oak Bluffs 
Tisbury . 
West Tisburv 



11,187 55 
922 10 
723 75 

1,181 99 

13 80 
633 78 



Essex Countv. 



Amesbury 

Andover 

Beverly . 

Dan vers . 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Groveland 

Hamilton 

Haverhill 

Ipswich . 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Merrimac 

Methuen 

Middleton 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

North Andover 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Salem 

Salisbmy 

Saugus . 

Swampscott 

Wenham 

West Newburv 



Ashfield . 
Bernardston 
Buckland 
Charlemont 
Colrain . 
Conway . 
Deerfield 
Erving . 



Franklin County. 



4,205 10 
2,084 80 
2,387 30 

109 49 

581 53 
2,898 23 
1,954 77 

478 09 
6,555 52 
3,330 98 

762 76 
1,147 19 
2,445 82 
2,825 60 
48 37 
3,130 91 
1,541 60 
3,606 33 
1,365 55 
1,569 99 

607 83 
1,720 71 
2,023 62 

454 86 

695 12 
1,963 47 



78 79 

734 10 

716 81 

4,818 30 

221 85 

783 16 

1,632 39 

1,186 32 



HIGHWAYS. 



35 



Greenfield 

Montague 

Northfield 

Orange . 

Shelburne 

Sunderland 

Whately 



Agawam 

Blandford 

Brimfield 

Chester . 

Chicopee 

Past Longmeadow 

Holyoke 

Monson 

Palmer 

Russell 

Wales 

West Springfield 

Westfield 

Wilbraham 



Amherst 
Belchertown . 
Easthampton 
Goshen . 
Granby . 
Hadley . 
Hatfield . 
Huntington 
Northampton 
South Hadley 
Southampton 
Ware ] 
Williamsburg 



Acton 
Arlington 
Ashby . 
Ashland . 
Aver 
Bedford . 



Hampden County 



Hampshire County 



Middlesex County 



$171 10 


872 81 


1,661 83 


1,119 74 


1,453 11 


228 42 


446 27 


1,711 72 


629 63 


337 67 


651 00 


2,081 73 


706 20 


683 10 


149 10 


3,435 60 


2,320 38 


133 66 


74 90 


2,365 03 


730 04 


1,051 31 


649 47 


271 07 


208 12 


1,274 39 


1,209 13 


49 85 


1,503 70 


500 93 


2,253 99 


204 05 


1,062 01 


832 16 


2,539 67 


197 12 


1,275 59 


1,101 91 


534 13 


1,036 84 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Billerica . 

Boxborough 

Burlington 

Chelmsford 

Concord . 

Dracut . 

Framingham 

Groton . 

Holliston 

Hudson . 

Lexington 

Lincoln . 

Littleton 

Lowell . 

Maiden . 

Marlborough 

Medford 

Melrose . 

Natick . 

Newton . 

North Readin 

Pepperell 

Reading . 

Shirley . 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Sudbury 

Tewksbury 

Townsend 

Tyngsborougl 

Watertown 

Wayland 

Westford 

Weston . 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Woburn . 



Nantucket 



Avon 

Bellingham 
Braintree 
Canton . 
Cohasset 



Nantucket County 
Norfolk County. 



£1,150 97 

1,109 28 

1,639 66 

5,686 01 

613 74 

1,438 25 

2,583 20 

210 49 

846 83 

714 09 

1,158 58 

168 14 

2,569 70 

2,575 96 

144 37 

2,324 60 

60 56 

1,155 33 

766 15 

284 50 

1,060 44 

925 18 

992 51 

306 84 

280 10 

1,604 54 

295 19 

172 61 

1,740 53 

4,427 80 

698 41 

355 52 

2,164 85 

736 40 

749 14 

1,470 74 

2,889 58 



4,130 91 



114 42 

995 28 

1,001 14 

1,690 36 

322 64 



HIGHWAYS. 



37 



Dedham 

Dover 

Foxborough 

Franklin 

Holbrook 

Milton . 

Needham 

Norfolk . 

Norwood 

Plainville 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Stoughton 

Walpole . 

Wellesley 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Wrentham 



$908 54 

965 68 

760 57 

1,360 46 

422 08 

269 98 

743 39 

485 74 

1,384 83 

2,513 62 

569 98 

451 29 

1,479 17 

1,933 71 

353 47 

92 20 

2,455 09 

2,121 58 



Plymouth County. 



Aldington 

Bridgewater . 

Brockton 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewater 

Hanover 

Hingham 

Kingston 

Lakeville 

Marion . 

Marshfield 

Mattapoisett 

Middleborough 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Scituate . 

Wareham 

West Bridgewater 

Whitman 



892 42 
869 73 
424 20 
854 81 
200 99 
571 91 
727 21 
157 18 
2,429 01 
975 63 
443 49 
224 46 
952 86 
627 74 
600 41 
945 56 

1.007 93 
564 87 

2.008 61 
460 01 
499 15 



Suffolk County. 

Boston 740 62 

Chelsea 674 00 

Revere 2,030 91 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Worcester County. 



Ashburnham 

Athol . 

Auburn . 

Barre 

Blackstone 

Brookfield 

Charlton 

Douglas . 

Dudley . 

Fitchburg 

Gardner . 

Grafton . 

Hardwick 

Harvard 

Holden . 

Hopedale 

Lancaster 

Leicester 

Leominster 

Lunenburg 

Mendon . 

Milford . 

Millbury 

Millville . 

New Braintree 

North Brookfield 

Northborough 

Northbridge 

Oakham . 

Oxford . 

Paxton . 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Princeton 

Rutland . 

Shrewsbury 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Spencer . 

Sterling . 

Sturbridge 

Sutton . 

Templeton 

Upton 



$3,252 37 

1,960 35 

2,162 46 

1,706 81 

2,157 39 

1,098 65 

2,293 12 

394 00 

1,684 39 

464 92 

726 31 

3,285 28 

233 07 

828 90 

2,840 95 

236 42 

915 25 

2,378 81 

1,412 25 

1,402 62 

316 58 

715 30 

1,092 24 

1,598 96 

9 48 

128 19 

596 36 

168 90 

558 09 

1,140 05 

323 39 

1,402 64 

523 43 

9 69 

1,953 76 

1,552 28 

945 66 

124 86 

442 75 

2,521 96 

471 97 

1,130 45 

1,331 96 

1,380 51 



HIGHWAYS. 



39 



Uxbridge 
Warren . 

Webster . 
West Boy 1st on 
West Brookfield 
West borough 
Westminster . 
Winchendon . 
Worcester 



Total 



$2,765 77 


395 10 


817 71 


512 44 


672 36 


869 27 


2,555 34 


3,474 63 


1,281 07 


$358,889 44 



The amounts expended for maintenance of State highways, 
the average expenditure per mile in 1920 for maintenance, the 
average cost per mile per year for each municipality, the num- 
ber of miles under maintenance, and the amounts to be as- 
sessed upon municipalities for maintenance under 1920 expendi- 
tures, by authority of chapter 344, Part 1, General Acts of 
1917, are shown in the following table: — 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 













Amounts 


EXPENDED. 






Town or City. 


REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 
















Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Abington 


$8,868 14 


$892 42 


$9,760 56 


$32,522 22 


$1,921 96 


$34,444 18 


Acton 






21,384 64 


2,539 67 


23,924 31 


103,059 12 


106,197 29 


209,256 41 


Acushnet 






12,673 89 


998 04 


13,671 93 


38,483 27 


2,168 98 


40,652 25 


Adams . 






8,280 57 


311 41 


8,591 98 


6,019 36 


1,326 75 


7,346 11 


Agawam 






17,759 56 


1,711 72 


19,471 28 


19,549 97 


340 64 


19,890 61 


Amesbury 






10,329 71 


4,205 10 


14,534 81 


6,538 93 


2,232 75 


8,771 68 


Amherst 






6,743 91 


1,051 31 


7,795 22 


9,755 30 


2,901 91 


12,657 21 


Andover 






26,038 87 


2,084 80 


28,123 67 


88,000 57 


3,396 95 


91,397 52 


Arlington 






340 80 


197 12 


537 92 


207 34 


401 41 


608 75 


Ashburnham 




' 


13,376 17 


3,252 37 


16,628 54 


24,369 89 


20,171 02 


44,540 91 


Ash by 






1,275 59 


16,542 37 


43,323 70 


7,899 66 


51,223 36 


Ashfield . 






4,816 56 


78 79 


4,895 35 


7,185 70 


1,698 88 


8,884 58 


Ashland . 






6,720 66 


1,101 91 


7,822 57 


5,692 04 


835 61 


6,527 65 


Athol 






15,714 41 


1,960 35 


17,674 76 


43,436 44 


1,813 85 


45,250 29 


Attleboro 






13,790 53 


1,462 00 


15,252 53 


44,362 59 


42,253 50 


86,616 09 


Auburn . 






42,520 36 


2,162 46 


44,682 82 


71,205 21 


2,928 57 


74,133 78 


Avon 






602 17 


114 42 


716 59 


1,972 74 


357 31 


2,330 05 


Ayer 






2,904 55 


534 13 


3,438 68 


4,261 83 


566 11 


4,827 94 


Barnstable 






27,977 35 


3,704 87 


31,682 22 


36,491 32 


5,820 51 


42,311 83 


Barre 






16,011 70 


1,706 81 


17,718 51 


23,960 48 


5,555 09 


29,515 57 


Becket . 






40,121 92 


1,664 86 


41,786 78 


196,074 01 


46,734 80 


242,808 81 


Bedford . 






4,992 89 


1,036 84 


6,029 73 


7,868 95 


149 23 


8,018 18 


Belchertown 






5,118 06 


649 47 


5,767 53 


5,131 32 


1,664 09 


6,795 41 


Bellingham 






5,325 05 


995 28 


6,320 33 


7,789 96 


892 80 


8,682 76 


Berkley . 






2,343 61 


427 81 


2,771 42 


1,722 55 


880 56 


2,603 11 


Bernardston 






9,147 25 


734 10 


9,881 35 


13,207 85 


36,970 57 


50,178 42 


Beverly . 






56,668 95 


2,387 30 


59,056 25 


159,315 45 


2,003 88 


161,319 33 


Billerica . 






3,847 80 


1,150 97 


4,998 77 


4,615 35 


1,145 27 


5,760 62 


Blackstone 






12,335 50 


2,157 39 


14,492 89 


11,682 49 


1,888 21 


13,570 70 


Blandford 






1,449 43 


629 63 


2,079 06 


7,212 38 


2,650 77 


9,863 15 


Boston . 






12,161 19 


740 62 


12,901 81 


73,852 72 


1,403 43 


75,256 15 


Bourne . 






16,758 70 


2,171 39 


18,930 09 


46,879 99 


1,918 45 


48,798 44 


Boxborough 






8,745 06 


1,109 28 


9,854 34 


10,262 77 


1,809 76 


12,072 53 


Braintree 






4,070 17 


1,001 14 


5,071 31 


13,030 12 


1,196 15 


14,226 27 


Brewster 






17,676 64 


1,319 08 


18,995 72 


42,813 61 


1,410 57 


44,224 18 


Bridgewater 






8,580 52 


869 73 


9,450 25 


28,175 54 


3,753 16 


31,928 70 


Brimfield 






7,166 05 


337 67 


7,503 72 


15,264 39 


2,384 57 


17,648 96 


Brockton 






16,485 53 


424 20 


16,909 73 


30,833 35 


548 08 


31,381 43 


Brookfield 






19,907 27 


1,098 65 


21,005 92 


42,881 86 


2,223 03 


45,104 89 


Buckland 






18,149 66 


716 81 


18,866 47 


43,776 17 


3,466 23 


47,242 40 


Burlington 






12,620 33 


1,639 66 


14,259 99 


10,863 43 


3,121 95 


13,985 38 


Canton . 






13,784 49 


1,690 36 


15,474 85 


54,076 87 


2,733 82 


56,810 69 


Charlemont 






15,885 77 


4,818 30 


20,704 07 


26,078 68 


13,015 37 


39,094 05 


Charlton 






21,350 68 


2,293 12 


23,643 80 


25,339 68 


4,995 43 


30,335 11 


Chatham 






13,518 42 


2,178 42 


15,696 84 


33,277 97 


2,194 01 


35,471 98 


Chelmsford 






20,948 12 


5,686 01 


26,634 13 


25,265 55 


8,838 21 


34,103 76 


Chelsea . 






8,950 06 


674 00 


9,624 06 


20,160 08 


274 99 


20,435 07 


Cheshire 






17,389 03 


1,222 21 


18,611 24 


15,165 07 


5,525 57 


20,692 64 


Chester . 






20,691 56 


651 00 


21,342 56 


28,842 15 


3,841 35 


32,683 50 


Chicopee 






28,272 10 


2,081 73 


30,353 83 


51,614 76 


2,535 23 


54,149 99 


Chilmark 






9,160 31 


1,187 55 


10,347 86 


16,473 27 


3,925 90 


20,399 17 


Clarksburg 






6,309 10 


569 84 


6,878 94 


6,804 59 


2,824 93 


9,629 52 


Cohasset 






8,401 44 


322 64 


8,724 08 


43,188 43 


3,338 04 


46,526 47 


Colrain . 






4,779 57 


221 85 


5,001 42 


3,908 16 


2,602 70 


6,510 86 


Concord 






22,538 50 


613 74 


23,152 24 


115,412 54 


1,178 29 


116,590 83 


Conway . 






881 02 


783 16 


1,664 18 


1,364 84 


2,985 88 


4,350 72 


Cummington 






- 


- 


- 


- 


466 23 


466 23 


Dalton . 






12,005 72 


720 41 


12,726 13 


10,043 50 


1,899 08 


11,942 58 


Dan vers . 






290 42 


109 49 


399 91 


168 58 


154 48 


323 06 


Dartmouth 






16,430 20 


2,903 09 


19,333 29 


91,479 53 


4,100 56 


95,580 09 


Dedham 






3,052 88 


908 54 


3,961 42 


5,525 73 


1,466 46 


6,992 19 


Deerfield 






32,899 66 


1,632 39 


34,532 05 


69,085 71 


5,540 37 


74,626 08 


Dennis . 






25,931 55 


1,694 68 


27,626 23 


39,068 53 


1,373 30 


40,441 83 


Dighton . 






7,314 49 


1,134 90 


8,449 39 


47,216 27 


2,118 90 


49,335 17 


Douglas . 






6,430 35 


394 00 


6,824 35 


11,381 25 


1,466 27 


12,847 52 


Dover 






7,504 75 


965 68 


8,470 43 


6,002 21 


950 66 


6,952 87 


Dracut . 






6,365 12 


1,438 25 


7,803 37 


7,835 95 


3,011 75 


10,847 70 


Dudley . 






10,181 04 


1,684 39 


11,865 43 


14,633 70 


2,328 51 


16,962 21 


Duxbury 






13,100 15 


854 81 


13,954 96 


50,448 17 


1,414 38 


51,862 55 


East Bridgewater . 




579 18 


200 99 


780 17 


22,161 42 


5,113 39 


27,274 81 


East Longmeadow 


6,573 50 


706 20 


7,279 70 


8,100 55 


1,105 83 


9,206 38 



HIGHWAYS. 



41 







Average Expenditure per 












Mile ix 1920 


. 


Average 


Length 

under 

Mainte- 


Amount to 










be assessed on 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 




Cost per 
Mile 


Cities and 
Towns under 




Vehicle 


Total. 


per Year. 


nance 

(Miles). 


1920 Ex- 




Fees Fund. 






penditures. 


$44,204 74 


$150 21 


$323 51 


$473 72 


$600 20 


5.941 


$1,188 20 


233,180 72 


322 82 


13,499 08 


13,821 90 


1,985 80 


7.867 


1,573 40 


54,324 18 


216 87 


471 31 


688 18 


791 07 


4.602 


460 20 


15,938 09 


153 56 


654 22 


807 78 


517 40 


2.028 


819 08 


39,361 89 


428 68 


85 31 


513 99 


756 31 


3.993 


798 60 


23,306 49 


1,276 21 


677 62 


1,953 83 


443 74 


3.295 


3,218 92 


20,452 43 


148 97 


411 21 


560 18 


567 67 


7.057 


1,976 61 


119,521 19 


478 49 


779 65 


1,258 14 


1,366 88 


4.357 


2,740 88 


1,146 67 


151 98 


309 49 


461 47 


884 09 


1.297 


299 26 


61,169 45 


529 01 


3,280 91 


3,809 92 


2,484 14 


6.148 


614 80 


67,765 73 


184 33 


1,141 57 


1,325 90 


689 38 


6.920 


346 00 


1:3,779 93 


49 00 


1,056 52 


1,105 52 


387 48 


1.608 


160 80 


14,350 22 


344 67 


261 37 


606 04 


344 62 


3.197 


319 70 


62,925 05 


351 32 


325 06 


676 38 


982 50 


5.580 


1,887 10 


101,868 62 


431 40 


12,467 84 


12,899 24 


1,744 89 


3.389 


5,840 60 


118,816 60 


408 09 


552 66 


960 75 


1,111 01 


5.299 


1,059 80 


3,046 64 


69 90 


218 27 


288 17 


422 91 


1.637 


163 70 


8,266 62 


153 57 


162 77 


316 34 


518 80 


3.478 


550 12 


73.994 05 


186 77 


293 42 


480 19 


408 63 


19.837 


4,762 69 


47.234 08 


281 61 


916 53 


1,198 14 


752 62 


6.061 


1,212 20 


284,595 59 


93 96 


2,637 70 


2,731 66 


2,298 31 


17.718 


885 80 


14,047 91 


629 53 


90 60 


720 13 


472 17 


1.647 


329 40 


12,562 94 


201 20 


515 51 


716 71 


286 47 


3.228 


322 80 


15,003 09 


312 98 


280 75 


593 73 


315 06 


3.180 


318 00 


5.374 53 


340 07 


699 97 


1,040 04 


379 45 


1.258 


62 90 


60,059 77 


83 64 


4,212 21 


4,295 85 


1,287 32 


8.777 


438 85 


220,375 58 


420 30 


352 80 


773 10 


2,143 46 


5.680 


2,195 59 


10,759 39 


214 89 


213 83 


428 72 


595 56 


5.356 


1,148 12 


28,063 59 


1,041 21 


911 30 


1,952 51 


994 35 


2.072 


414 40 


11,942 21 


152 34 


641 37 


793 71 


1,083 58 


4.133 


206 65 


88,157 96 


530 53 


1,005 32 


1,535 85 


5,554 65 


1.396 


1,072 02 


67,728 53 


168 80 


149 13 


317 93 


491 11 


12.864 


2,044 92 


21,926 87 


335 03 


546 59 


881 62 


386 04 


3.311 


165 55 


19,297 58 


167 75 


200 43 


368 18 


657 18 


5.968 


1,098 64 


63,219 90 


168 66 


180 36 


349 02 


390 79 


7.821 


391 05 


41,378 95 


191 49 


826 32 


1,017 81 


746 00 


4.542 


2,311 45 


25,152 68 


85 12 


601 10 


686 22 


313 07 


3.967 


198 35 


48,291 16 


111 93 


144 61 


256 54 


710 37 


3.790 


486 14 


66,110 81 


618 96 


1,252 41 


1,871 37 


904 12 


1.775 


177 50 


66,108 87 


166 70 


806 10 


972 80 


741 33 


4.300 


860 00 


28,245 37 


431 60 


821 71 


1,253 31 


476 43 


3.799 


379 90 


72,285 54 


523 01 


845 86 


1,368 87 


1,658 76 


3.232 


2,212 09 


59,798 12 


404 15 


1,091 71 


1,495 86 


970 02 


11.922 


596 10 


53,978 91 


221 00 


481 44 


702 44 


504 32 


10.376 


1,037 60 


51,168 82 


303 99 


306 17 


610 16 


473 77 


7.166 


1,433 20 


60,737 89 


791 04 


1,229 58 


2,020 62 


664 09 


7.188 


5,224 97 


30,059 13 


702 81 


286 75 


989 56 


1,199 58 


.959 


474 50 


39,303 88 


183 24 


828 72 


1,011 96 


482 20 


6.670 


333 50 


54.026 06 


98 40 


580 62 


679 02 


599 30 


6.616 


661 60 


84,503 82 


526 49 


641 18 


1,167 67 


1,343 16 


3.954 


2,308 48 


30,747 03 


152 47 


504 03 


656 50 


363 28 


7.789 


389 45 


16,508 46 


198 14 


982 24 


1,180 38 


845 59 


2.876 


143 80 


55,250 55 


141 45 


1,463 41 


1,604 86 


1,204 47 


2.281 


1,830 34 


11,512 28 


104 01 


1,220 21 


1,324 22 


278 34 


2.133 


213 30 


139,743 07 


146 48 


281 21 


427 69 


1,996 01 


4.190 


896 02 


6,014 90 


254 77 


971 33 


1,226 10 


903 13 


3.074 


153 70 


466 23 


- 


326 03 


326 03 


977 42 


1.430 


71 50 


24,668 71 


250 92 


661 47 


912 39 


453 97 


2.871 


574 20 


722 97 


37 35 


52 71 


90 06 


327 13 


2.931 


131 99 


114,913 38 


625 40 


883 36 


1,508 76 


1,378 10 


4.642 


3,501 83 


10,953 61 


385 79 


622 70 


1,008 49 


395 40 


2.355 


1,187 50 


109,158 13 


134 15 


455 32 


589 47 


832 29 


12.168 


2,433 60 


68,068 06 


226 02 


183 16 


409 18 


437 79 


7."498 


749 80 


57,784 56 


186 17 


347 59 


533 76 


829 34 


6.096 


1,219 20 


19,671 87 


185 41 


690 01 


875 42 


570 39 


2.125 


425 00 


15,423 30 


442 77 


435 88 


878 65 


531 51 


2.181 


436 20 


18,651 07 


252 19 


528 10 


780 29 


383 30 


5.703 


1,140 60 


28,827 64 


528 69 


730 86 


1,259 55 


772 40 


3.186 


637 20 


65,817 51 


95 86 


158 62 


254 48 


594 16 


8.917 


1,134 59 


28,054 98 


53 37 


1,357 78 


1,411 15 


3,989 61 


3.766 


753 20 


16,486 08 


392 55 


614 69 


1,007 24 


687 20 


1.799 


179 90 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 









Amounts 


EXPENDED. 








REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 


Town or City. 




























Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Eastham 


$10,561 22 


$1,312 10 


$11,873 32 


$18,837 67 


$112,317 17 


$131,154 84 


Easthampton 


8,205 81 


271 07 


8,476 88 


26,555 67 


827 65 


27,383 32 


Easton . 


4,971 90 


184 11 


5,156 01 


22,221 55 


110 48 


22.332 03 


Edgartown 


6,498 76 


922 10 


7,420 86 


1,915 99 


1,543 46 


3,459 45 


Egremont 


1,221 57 


1,383 66 


2,605 23 


10,153 73 


1,075 20 


11,228 93 


Erving . 


17,484 36 


1,186 32 


18,670 68 


52,599 21 


4,041 49 


56,640 70 


Essex 


6,224 85 


581 53 


6,806 38 


5,161 43 


686 41 


5,847 84 


Fairhaven 


2,868 50 


489 55 


3,358 05 


21,506 45 


676 21 


22,182 66 


Fall River 


66 30 


- 


66 30 


50 81 


128 77 


179 58 


Falmouth 


37,928 06 


3,709 63 


41,637 69 


85,193 32 


3,390 70 


88,584 02 


Fitchburg 


15,821 83 


464 92 


16,286 75 


85,695 74 


807 93 


86,503 67 


Florida . 


17,362 15 


7,223 95 


24,586 10 


34,484 76 


15,084 53 


49,569 29 


Foxborough . 


7,434 47 


760 57 


8,195 04 


24,863 59 


1,357 54 


26,221 13 


Framingham . 


13,563 26 


2,583 20 


16,146 46 


12,025 09 


1,771 18 


13,796 27 


Franklin 


8,900 89 


1,360 46 


10,261 35 


9,633 34 


954 80 


10,588 14 


Freetown 


8,227 57 


272 22 


8,499 79 


49,385 77 


779 06 


50,164 83 


Gardner . 


10,132 47 


726 31 


10,858 78 


43,310 86 


2,322 82 


45,633 68 


Gay Head 


3,420 04 


723 75 


4,143 79 


2,768 50 


4,143 91 


6,912 41 


Gill 


71 50 


- 


71 50 


1 12 


108 29 


109 41 


Gloucester 


53,218 81 


2,898 23 


56,117 04 


41,490 39 


1,671 99 


43,162 38 


Goshen . 


9,222 49 


208 12 


9,430 61 


18,557 65 


1,226 07 


19,783 72 


Grafton . 


17,948 88 


3,285 28 


21,234 16 


20,173 36 


3,883 00 


24,056 36 


Granby . 


14,115 84 


1,274 39 


15,390 23 


11,495 73 


3,952 22 


15,447 95 


Great Barrington . 


18,693 62 


2,296 99 


20,990 61 


41,262 97 


1,811 41 


43,074 38 


Greenfield 


9,013 83 


171 10 


9,184 93 


38,619 65 


33,320 04 


71,939 69 


Groton . 


3,657 03 


210 49 


3,867 52 


5,533 38 


250 66 


5,784 04 


Groveland 


6,232 27 


1,954 77 


8,187 04 


7,219 95 


2,098 53 


9,318 4S 


Hadley . 


20,629 45 


1,209 13 


21,838 58 


47,874 57 


2,152 74 


50,027 31 


Hamilton 


13,803 60 


478 09 


14,281 69 


55,263 81 


2,898 23 


58,162 04 


Hancock 


48,866 36 


179 54 


49,045 90 


107,023 32 


66,301 02 


173,324 34 


Hanover 


4,394 56 


571 91 


4,966 47 


12,853 18 


1,205 75 


14,058 93 


Hard wick 


3,213 40 


233 07 


3,446 47 


2,708 80 


913 06 


3,621 86 


Harvard 


5,242 95 


828 90 


6,071 85 


6,950 46 


1,353 95 


8,304 41 


Harwich 


13,736 98 


1,055 36 


14,792 34 


39,046 23 


755 41 


39,801 64 


Hatfield . 


8,134 01 


49 85 


8,183 86 


70,079 24 


266 52 


70,345 76 


Haverhill 


27,418 76 


6,555 52 


33,974 28 


15,694 46 


6,385 67 


22,080 13 


Hingham 


9,897 66 


727 21 


10,624 87 


47,564 05 


2,930 39 


50,494 44 


Hinsdale 


2,295 80 


429 18 


2,724 98 


2,381 67 


1,262 02 


3,643 69 


Hoi brook 


4,364 40 


422 08 


4,786 48 


6,608 22 


1,062 52 


7,670 74 


Holden . 


22,564 68 


2,840 95 


25,405 63 


24,852 75 


2,864 15 


27,716 90 


Holliston 


7,638 75 


846 83 


8,485 58 


8,290 53 


1,586 21 


9,876 74 


Hoi yoke . 


9,017 15 


683 10 


9,700 25 


44,745 16 


1,201 26 


45,946 42 


Hopedale 


55 48 


236 42 


291 90 


378 71 


203 51 


582 22 


Hudson 


3,389 63 


714 09 


4,103 72 


2,801 95 


435 66 


3,237 61 


Huntington . 


15,479 70 


1,503 70 


16,983 40 


13,980 82 


3,325 64 


17,306 46 


Ipswich . 


19,000 99 


3,330 98 


22,331 97 


74,271 58 


1,679 58 


75,951 16 


Kingston 


2,752 17 


157 18 


2,909 35 


5,720 86 


548 94 


6,269 80 


Lakeville 


8,978 10 


2,429 01 


11,407 11 


48,641 10 


5,361 79 


54,002 89 


Lancaster 


4,936 00 


915 25 


5,851 25 


4,444 08 


1,052 03 


5,496 11 


Lanes borough 


5,400 27 


365 74 


5,766 01 


4,780 77 


1,177 81 


5,958 58 


Lawrence 


6,312 53 


762 76 


7,075 29 


21,081 10 


1,111 85 


22,192 95 


Lee .... 


35,427 30 


2,800 98 


39,228 28 


29,618 32 


3,508 50 


33,126 82 


Leicester 


45,836 09 


2,378 81 


48,214 90 


68,639 65 


38,817 24 


107,456 89 


Lenox 


55,417 03 


1,688 63 


57,105 66 


53,270 93 


4,263 51 


57,534 44 


Leominster 


8,857 76 


1,412 25 


10,270 01 


6,979 88 


1,811 10 


8,790 98 


Lexington 


24,774 57 


1,158 58 


25,933 15 


112,858 41 


1,543 66 


114,402 07 


Lincoln . 


11,820 27 


168 14 


11,988 41 


68,317 58 


865 60 


69,183 18 


Littleton 


14,072 18 


2,569 70 


16,641 88 


54,600 33 


29,604 32 


84,204 65 


Lowell (east) . 








f 379 07 
\ 19,031 95 


1 


f 379 07 


Lowell (south) > 


26,319 43 


2,575 96 


28,895 39 


2,734 53 


21,766 48 
( 3,018 16 


Lowell (north) J 








( 3,018 16 


Lunenburg 


21,289 26 


1,402 62 


22,691 88 


54,166 56 


86,578 10 


140,744 66 


Lynn 


14,569 52 


1,147 19 


15,716 71 


13,364 54 


1,699 99 


15.064 53 


Maiden . 


94 75 


144 37 


239 12 


475 36 


12 30 


487 66 


Mansfield 


2,604 37 


159 41 


2,763 78 


10,156 96 


1,410 73 


11,567 69 


Marion . 


18,136 62 


975 63 


19,112 25 


62,483 16 


1,856 53 


64,339 69 


Marlborough . 


39,981 99 


2,324 60 


42,306 59 


165,084 90 


3,427 44 


168,512 34 


Marshfield 


16,395 24 


443 49 


16,838 73 


85,805 30 


10,471 02 


96,276 32 


Mashpee 


2,417 16 


591 36 


3,008 52 


4,337 33 


589 02 


4,926 35 


Mattapoisett . 


9,922 24 


224 46 


10,146 70 


63,100 32 


5,811 37 


68,911 69 


Medford . 


3,368 96 


60 56 


3,429 52 


19,743 57 


309 67 


20,053 24 


Melrose . 


1,857 67 


1,155 33 


3,013 00 


2,065 55 


354 04 


2,419 59 



HIGHWAYS. 



43 





Average Expenditure per 












Mile in 1920 




Average 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 


Amount to 










be assessed on 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


Cities and 
Towns under 

1920 Ex- 
penditures. 


$143,028 16 


$203 11 


$17,386 56 


$17,589 67 


$1,834 21 


6.460 


$323 00 


35,860 20 


99 00 


302 28 


401 28 


639 40 


2.738 


549 36 


27,488 04 


229 85 


137 93 


367 78 


1,721 23 


.801 


147 30 


10,880 31 


375 14 


627 93 


1,003 07 


194 97 


2.458 


245 80 


13,834 16 


253 32 


196 85 


450 17 


1,037 58 


5.462 


273 10 


75,311 38 


146 04 


497 54 


643 58 


792 23 


8.123 


812 30 


12,654 22 


399 13 


471 11 


870 24 


902 06 


1.457 


145 70 


25,540 71 


131 35 


181 44 


312 79 


588 15 


3.727 


582 88 


245 88 


- 


4,024 06 


4,024 06 


1,287 33 


.032 


64 00 


130,221 71 


238 91 


218 37 


457 28 


564 45 


15.527 


3,550 16 


102,790 42 


112 93 


196 24 


309 17 


1,242 21 


4.117 


636 42 


74,155 39 


1,004 44 


2,097 40 


3,101 84 


1,687 92 


7.192 


719 20 


34,416 17 


216 44 


386 32 


602 76 


615 43 


3.514 


702 80 


29,942 73 


805 74 


552 46 


1,358 20 


682 56 


3.206 


2,177 19 


20,849 49 


361 54 


253 73 


615 27 


521 14 


3.763 


1,157 63 


58,664 62 


70 36 


201 35 


271 71 


926 81 


3.869 


386 90 


56,492 46 


216 42 


692 14 


908 56 


785 10 


3.356 


1,524 56 


11,056 20 


230 93 


1,322 24 


1,553 17 


600 88 


3.134 


■ 156 70 


180 91 


- 


381 30 


381 30 


86 60 


.284 


14 20 


99,279 42 


429 62 


247 85 


677 47 


1,104 56 


6.746 


2,285 11 


29,214 33 


84 67 


498 81 


583 48 


540 54 


2.458 


122 90 


45,290 52 


343 00 


405 41 


748 41 


586 36 


9.578 


1,915 60 


30,838 18 


165 81 


514 21 


680 02 


386 35 


7.686 


384 30 


64,064 99 


263 96 


208 16 


472 12 


746 35 


8.702 


2,054 20 


81,124 62 


31 38 


6,112 65 


6,144 03 


1,070 77 


5.451 


4,979 07 


9,651 56 


138 94 


165 45 


304 39 


375 36 


1.515 


230 57 


17,505 52 


1,134 52 


1,217 95 


2,352 47 


578 48 


1.723 


172 30 


71,865 89 


257 70 


458 81 


716 51 


783 22 


4.692 


938 40 


72,443 73 


154 17 


934 61 


1,088 78 


1,638 77 


3.101 


620 20 


222,370 24 


55 52 


20,501 24 


20,556 76 


3,067 20 


3.234 


161 70 


19,025 40 


100 39 


211 65 


312 04 


579 33 


5.697 


888 83 


7,068 33 


284 58 


1,114 85 


1,399 43 


414 30 


.819 


163 80 


14,376 26 


357 90 


584 61 


942 51 


423 70 


2.316 


463 20 


54,593 98 


162 94 


116 63 


279 57 


480 15 


6.477 


647 70 


78,529 62 


14 08 


75 29 


89 37 


1,988 29 


3.540 


158 19 


56,054 41 


1,146 87 


1,117 15 


2,264 02 


629 78 


5.716 


6,470 59 


61,119 31 


185 75 


748 50 


934 25 


910 76 


3.915 


1,828 80 


6,368 67 


121 75 


358 02 


479 77 


307 08 


3.525 


176 25 


12,457 22 


164 75 


414 72 


579 47 


304 36 


2.562 


512 40 


53,122 53 


408 89 


412 23 


821 12 


469 82 


6.948 


1,389 60 


18,362 32 


171 98 


322 14 


494 12 


194 73 


4.924 


984 80 


55,646 67 


163 93 


288 28 


452 21 


1,286 24 


4.167 


942 18 


874 12 


748 16 


643 02 


1,391 18 


1,106 48 


.316 


219 97 


7,341 33 


625 30 


381 49 


1,006 79 


469 00 


1.142 


574 88 


34,289 86 


187 70 


415 13 


602 83 


616 75 


8.011 


400 55 


98,283 13 


753 27 


379 82 


1,133 09 


1,997 95 


4.422 


2,505 28 


9,179 15 


61 88 


216 11 


277 99 


353 28 


2.540 


254 00 


65,410 00 


290 59 


641 44 


932 03 


613 37 


8.359 


835 90 


11,347 36 


732 78 


842 30 


1,575 08 


499 77 


1.249 


249 80 


11,724 59 


111 51 


359 09 


470 60 


560 18 


3.280 


164 00 


29,268 24 


942 84 


1,374 36 


2,317 20 


3,220 18 


.809 


937 31 


72,355 10 


261 65 


327 74 


589 39 


555 57 


10.705 


2,141 00 


155,671 79 


450 88 


8,010 16 


8,501 04 


1,405 66 


4.846 


969 20 


114,640 10 


220 36 


556 38 


776 74 


954 77 


7.663 


2,976 07 


19,060 99 


554 04 


710 51 


1,264 55 


457 50 


2.549 


1,611 68 


140,335 22 


231 39 


308 30 


539 69 


1,438 09 


5.007 


1,351 12 


81,171 59 


81 58 


419 99 


498 57 


1,649 79 


2.061 


206 10 


100,846 53 
379 07 


414 53 

1 


4,775 66 


5,190 19 


1,602 21 


6.199 


619 90 


50,661 87 

3,018 16 

163,436 54 


f 970 60 
238 30 


1,030 34 


2,000 94 


973 11 


2.654 


2,655 25 


14,709 15 


14,947 45 


2,083 10 


5.886 


588 60 


30,781 24 


313 27 


464 22 


777 49 


1,087 17 


3.662 


1,423 59 


726 78 


956 09 


81 46 


1,037 55 


1,991 17 


.151 


78 34 


14,331 47 


131 42 


1,163 01 


1,294 43 


719 43 


1.213 


785 07 


83,451 94 


147 58 


280 82 


428 40 


693 28 


6.611 


1,322 20 


210,818 93 


332 85 


490 76 


823 61 


1,824 10 


6.984 


2,876 02 


113,115 05 


53 57 


1,264 77 


1,318 34 


900 38 


8.279 


1,655 80 


7,934 87 


75 70 


75 40 


151 10 


166 30 


7.812 


390 60 


79,058 39 


70 01 


1,812 65 


1,882 66 


1,168 88 


3.206 


320 60 


23,482 76 


70 26 


359 24 


429 50 


2,197 93 


.862 


185 11 


5,432 59 


2,037 61 


624 40 


2,662 01 


900 18 


.567 


754 68 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Town or City. 



Mendon . 

Merrimac 

Methuen 

Middleborough 

Middleton 

Milford . 

Millbury 

Millville . 

Milton . 

Monson . 

Montague 

Nantucket 

Natick . 

Needham 

Nev/ Braintree 

Newbury 

Nevvburyport 

New Marlborough 

Newton 

Norfolk . 

North Adams 

Northampton 

North Andover 

North Attleborough 

Northborough 

North bridge . 

North Brookfield 

Northfield 

North Reading 

Norton . 

Norwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Oakham 

Orange 

Orleans 

Oxford 

Palmer 

Paxton 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Pittsfield 

Plainville 

Plymouth 

Princeton 

Provincetown 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Ray n ham 

Reading . 

Rehoboth 

Revere (east) . 

Revere (west) 

Revere (north) 

Richmond 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Russell . 

Rutland . 

Salem 

Salisbury 

Sandwich 

Saugus 

Savoy 

Scituate 

Seekonk 

Sharon 

Sheffield 

Shelburne 



Amounts expended. 



REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 



Totals 
to 1920. 



$202 43 

7,752 91 

12,342 44 

27,692 42 

15,897 80 

6,531 62 

19,290 06 

2,382 94 

8,047 27 

5,028 67 

12,883 23 

20,755 30 

15,223 34 

6,349 03 

537 38 

19,120 37 

12,715 50 

209 76 

3,990 07 

6,163 90 

59,698 61 

11,787 31 

19,157 96 

11,330 82 

19,787 59 

1,073 19 

4,204 23 

6,728 63 

20,682 51 

11,244 15 

13,274 48 

10,179 57 

905 38 

20,418 81 

9,692 04 

7,560 29 

45,962 31 

26,523 36 

3,628 11 

3,718 68 

248 40 

25,029 07 

60,586 13 

4,540 79 

20,299 89 

4,592 61 

4,208 00 

10,067 57 

3,819 28 

4,780 79 

40,362 36 

15,546 08 

17,155 85 

8,790 37 
10,749 25 

7,453 97 

9,370 76 
12,634 78 
38,897 63 

4,019 66 
19,907 32 
11,174 30 
12,539 77 
17,433 65 

4,123 88 
13,664 49 
11,939 27 

1,051 56 

7,370 13 
13,627 54 



During 
1920. 



$316 58 

2,445 82 

2,825 60 

952 86 

48 37 

715 30 

1,092 24 

1,598 96 

269 98 

149 10 

872 81 

4,130 91 

766 15 

743 39 

9 48 

3,130 91 

1,541 60 

59 30 

284 50 

485 74 

4,831 14 

500 93 

3,606 33 

2,831 92 

596 36 

168 90 

128 19 

1,661 83 

1,060 44 

1,749 98 

1,384 83 

1,181 99 

558 09 

1,119 74 

1,053 75 

1,140 05 

3,435 60 

323 39 

627 74 

925 18 

1,402 64 

523 43 

1,395 53 

2,513 62 

600 41 

9 69 

1,526 39 

569 98 

451 29 

1,408 79 

992 51 

1,677 76 

2,030 91 

783 50 

945 56 

1,007 93 

1,365 55 

1,569 99 

2,320 38 

1,953 76 

607 83 

1,720 71 

1,749 10 

2,023 62 

511 38 

564 87 

1,563 78 

1,592 85 
1,453 11 



Total. 



$519 01 
10,198 73 
15,168 04 
28,645 28 
15,946 17 
7,246 92 

20.382 30 
3,981 90 
8,317 25 
5,177 77 

13,756 04 

24,886 21 

15,989 49 

7,092 42 

546 86 

22,251 28 

14,257 10 

269 06 

4,274 57 

6,649 64 

64,529 75 

12,288 24 

22,764 29 

14,162 74 

20.383 95 
1,242 09 
4,332 42 
8,390 46 

21,742 95 

12,994 13 

14,659 31 

11,361 56 

1,463 47 

21,538 55 

10,745 79 

8,700 34 

49,397 91 

26,846 75 

4,255 85 

4,643 86 

1,651 04 

25,552 50 

61,981 66 

7,054 41 

20,900 30 

4,602 30 

5,734 39 

10,637 55 

4,270 57 

6,189 58 

41,354 87 

17,223 84 

19,186 76 

9,573 87 
11,694 81 

8,461 90 
10,736 31 
14,204 77 
41,218 01 

5,973 42 
20,515 15 
12,895 01 
14,288 87 
19,457 27 

4,635 26 
14,229 36 
13,503 05 

1,051 56 

8,962 98 
15,080 65 



MOTOR VEHICLE FEES FUND. 



Totals 
to 1920. 



$2,596 44 

5,980 69 

78,008 42 

105,923 74 

3,047 40 
10,159 75 

52,848 59 

3,647 72 
14,270 93 

2,067 72 

44,282 29 
13,200 89 

80,364 12 

5,545 07 

311 31 

16,859 74 

9,843 68 

192 06 

18,080 77 

14,350 51 

104,614 88 

45,906 19 

14,720 33 

52,360 97 

74,980 23 

2,253 86 

4,307 44 

19,644 23 

66,266 15 

14,125 03 

26,386 79 

5,673 62 

4,244 54 

62,785 64 

16,633 25 

8,113 66 

139,891 99 

21,888 90 

4,494 93 

8,199 62 

3,265 81 

29,723 18 

78,038 84 

26,170 26 

79,761 02 

6,737 52 

15,162 34 

52,079 61 

46,031 31 

12,015 73 

54,466 38 

59,972 46 

1,166 67 
36,317 12 

3,526 10 

26,588 44 

30,325 36 

13,448 87 

4,116 92 

98,832 12 

45,870 18 

9,710 61 

12,189 87 

54,509 42 

28,523 17 

70,226 45 

7,264 09 

47,640 11 

54,917 26 

1,128 20 

13,321 93 
22,796 18 



During 
1920. 



$482 42 

2,432 69 

5,638 26 

13,803 06 

252 30 
1,216 00 
1,608 86 
1,301 62 

576 58 

508 58 
3,082 03 

829 22 
1,379 34 
1,247 66 

134 11 
2,116 63 

375 69 

351 30 
1,734 09 
11,976 93 
1,306 24 
4,376 88 
3,238 97 
1,781 07 

753 09 

793 70 
6,214 22 
1,502 14 
3,464 46 
2,454 12 
1,432 05 
1,924 40 
1,693 63 
1,333 11 
2,124 68 
6,764 02 
4,071 69 

893 45 
1,849 50 
3,483 65 

517 63 

72,254 57 

2,474 50 

1,113 17 

1,126 66 

889 63 

10,395 94 

6,179 91 

3.119 78 
2,265 40 
3,495 16 

1,950 72 

5,326 01 
2,160 43 
1,430 69 

543 06 
1,589 12 
6,777 47 
3,366 62 

809 97 
2,655 05 
3,414 11 
1,037 55 
2,583 19 
1,305 21 
35,959 91 

622 29 

2.120 12 
7,474 58 



Total. 



$3,078 86 
8,413 38 

83.646 68 
119,726 80 

3,299 70 
11,375 75 
54,457 45 

4,949 34 
14,847 51 

2,576 30 
47,364 32 
14,030 11 
81,743 46 

6,792 73 

445 42 

18,976 37 

10,219 37 

192 06 

18,432 07 

16,084 60 

116,591 81 

47,212 43 

19,097 21 

55,599 94 

76,761 30 

3,006 95 

5,101 14 
25,858 45 
67,768 29 
17,589 49 
28,840 91 

7,105 67 

6,168 94 
64,479 27 
17,966 36 
10,238 34 
146,656 01 
25,960 59 

5,388 38 
10,049 12 

6.749 46 
30,240 81 

150,293 41 

28,644 76 

80,874 19 

7,864 18 

16,051 97 

62,475 55 

52,211 22 

15,135 51 

56,731 78 

63,467 62 

1,166 67 

38,267 84 

3,526 10 

31,914 45 

32,485 79 

14,879 56 

4,659 98 

100,421 24 

52.647 65 
13,077 23 
12,999 84 
57,164 47 
31,937 28 
71,264 00 

9,847 28 
48,945 32 
90,877 17 

1.750 49 
15,442 05 
30,270 76 



HIGHWAYS. 



45 





Average Expenditure per 












Mile in 1920 




Average 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 


Amount to 










be assessed on 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


Cities and 
Towns under 

1920 Ex- 
penditures. 


$3,597 87 


$341 14 


$519 85 


$860 99 


$553 86 


.928 


$46 40 


18,612 11 


1,096 77 


1,090 89 


2,187 66 


422 90 


2.230 


223 00 


113,318 72 


362 44 


723 22 


1,085 66 


1,282 62 


7.796 


4,231 93 


148,372 08 


76 57 


1,109 12 


1,185 69 


682 44 


12.445 


5,404 69 


4,741 87 


18 22 


95 03 


113 25 


286 17 


2.655 


150 33 


18,622 67 


201 66 


342 82 


544 48 


419 40 


3.547 


965 65 


74,839 75 


366 27 


539 52 


905 79 


1,496 79 


2.982 


596 40 


8,931 24 


964 98 


785 53 


1,750 51 


407 50 


1.657 


165 70 


23,164 76 


255 43 


545 48 


800 91 


1,303 73 


1.057 


423 28 


7,754 07 


92 32 


314 91 


407 23 


234 79 


1.615 


323 00 


61,120 36 


152 32 


537 87 


690 19 


706 43 


5.730 


1,977 42 


38,916 32 


638 96 


128 26 


767 22 


269 49 


6.465 


2,480 06 


97,732 95 


239 12 


430 51 


669 00 


1,771 58 


3.204 


1,072 74 


13,885 15 


365 48 


613 40 


978 88 


422 04 


2.034 


995 52 


992 28 


23 88 


337 81 


361 69 


130 94 


.397 


19 85 


41,227 65 


739 99 


500 26 


1,240 25 


550 80 


4.231 


846 20 


24,476 47 


694 41 


169 23 


863 64 


609 74 


2.220 


958 64 


461 12 


257 82 


- 


257 82 


1,002 43 


.230 


23 00 


22,706 64 


275 68 


340 49 


616 17 


1,109 69 


1.032 


317 90 


22,734 24 


335 92 


1,199 23 


1,535 15 


527 22 


1.446 


144 60 


181,121 56 


593 80 


1,472 07 


2,065 87 


1,652 34 


8.136 


8,404 03 


59,500 67 


71 53 


186 58 


258 11 


891 14 


7.001 


903 58 


41,861 50 


340 05 


412 72 


752 77 


423 73 


10.605 


3,991 60 


69,762 68 


787 30 


900 46 


1,687 76 


814 56 


3.597 


3,035 44 


97,145 25 


111 20 


332 10 


443 30 


1,162 05 


5.363 


1,072 60 


4,249 04 


37 54 


167 39 


204 93 


279 80 


4.499 


461 00 


9,433 56 


56 92 


352 44 


409 36 


314 49 


2.252 


450 40 


34,248 91 


344 21 


1,287 12 


1,631 33 


951 46 


4.828 


482 80 


89,511 24 


417 83 


591 86 


1,009 69 


1,869 45 


2.538 


253 80 


30,583 62 


229 63 


454 60 


684 23 


573 53 


7.621 


762 10 


43,500 22 


652 30 


1,155 97 


1,808 27 


913 23 


2.123 


1,919 47 


18,467 23 


495 18 


599 94 


1,095 12 


316 35 


2.387 


477 40 


7,632 41 


199 89 


689 26 


889 15 


683 54 


2.792 


139 60 


86,017 82 


233 47 


353 13 


586 60 


882 68 


4.796 


959 20 


28,712 15 


224 25 


283 70 


507 95 


372 05 


4.699 


939 80 


18,938 68 


254 87 


475 00 


729 87 


481 66 


4.473 


894 60 


196,053 92 


239 16 


470 87 


710 03 


1,254 64 


14.365 


5,099 81 


52,807 34 


89 93 


113 23 


203 16 


620 87 


3.596 


179 80 


9,644 23 


144 51 


205 67 


350 18 


383 83 


4.344 


434 40 


14,692 98 


258 72 


517 20 


775 92 


537 02 


3.576 


715 20 


8,400 50 


171 35 


425 56 


596 91 


696 26 


8.186 


818 60 


55,793 31 


187 95 


185 86 


373 81 


1,227 11 


2.785 


139 25 


212,275 07 


154 15 


7,981 28 


8,135 43 


1,675 35 


9.053 


5,469 77 


35,699 17 


1,096 21 


1,079 15 


2,175 36 


1,069 15 


2.293 


229 30 


101,774 49 


41 98 


77 83 


119 81 


544 36 


14.302 


856 79 


12,466 48 


4 34 


505 23 


509 57 


298 09 


2.230 


223 00 


21,786 36 


420 49 


245 08 


665 57 


808 69 


3.630 


726 00 


73,113 10 


213 08 


3,886 33 


4,099 41 


1,695 14 


2.675 


5,350 00 


56,481 79 


121 64 


1,665 74 


1,787 38 


1,467 82 


3.710 


742 00 


21,325 09 


249 21 


551 88 


801 09 


421 82 


5.653 


565 30 


98,086 65 


253 00 


577 47 


830 47 


1,457 80 


3.923 


1,628 96 


80,691 46 


256 34 


534 02 


790 36 


764 15 


6.545 


654 50 


1,166 67 


) 












57,454 60 


\ 404 48 


388 51 


792 99 


2,462 55 


5.021 


1,990 82 


3,526 10 


J 












41,488 32 


195 05 


1,325 87 


1,520 92 


581 22 


4.017 


200 85 


44,180 60 


153 22 


350 09 


503 31 


448 75 


6.171 


617 10 


23,341 46 


428 17 


607 77 


1,035 94 


630 34 


2.354 


1,219 31 


15,396 29 


853 47 


339 41 


1,192 88 


747 39 


1.600 


320 00 


114,626 01 


431 91 


437 17 


869 08 


2,746 38 


3.635 


363 50 


93,865 66 


238 72 


697 27 


935 99 


573 83 


9.720 


1,944 00 


19,050 65 


352 09 


606 71 


958 80 


678 27 


5.549 


554 90 


33,514 99 


183 58 


244 63 


428 21 


1,248 55 


3.311 


708 90 


70,059 48 


173 77 


268 13 


441 90 


845 47 


9.902 


990 20 


46,226 15 


183 71 


358 59 


542 30 


467 19 


9.521 


952 10 


90,721 27 


603 16 


309 25 


912 41 


2,171 77 


3.355 


1,530 59 


14,482 54 


282 53 


1,427 18 


1,709 71 


1,318 99 


1.810 


90 50 


63,174 68 


105 13 


242 92 


348 05 


730 76 


5.373 


935 04 


104,380 22 


259 38 


5,964 49 


6,223 87 


1,373 38 


6.029 


1,205 80 


2,802 05 


- 


975 38 


975 38 


362 63 


.638 


127 60 


24,405 03 


138 48 


184 33 


322 81 


505 87 


11.502 


1,150 20 


45,351 41 


220 77 


1,135 61 


1,356 38 


798 03 


6.582 


1,316 40 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 









Amounts 


EXPENDED. 






Town or City. 


REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 
















Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Totals 
to 1920. 


During 
1920. 


Total. 


Shirley . 


$2,196 60 


$306 84 


$2,503 44 


$2,696 92 


$244 03 


$2,940 95 


Shrewsbury . 


50,022 97 


1,552 28 


51,575 25 


97,507 34 


9,424 42 


106,931 76 


Somerset 


21,960 26 


4,087 38 


26,047 64 


120,082 94 


4,661 89 


124,744 83 


Somerville 


7,411 64 


280 10 


7,691 74 


43,734 36 


325 76 


44,060 12 


Southampton 


1,312 65 


204 05 


1,516 70 


1,155 39 


527 68 


1,683 07 


Southborough 


9,110 06 


945 66 


10,055 72 


9,006 46 


1,619 31 


10,625 77 


Southbridge . 


4,265 67 


124 86 


4,390 53 


7,852 25 


216 78 


8,069 03 


South Hadley 


53,084 69 


2,253 99 


55,338 68 


51,007 38 


4,010 80 


55,018 18 


Spencer . 


23,624 78 


442 75 


24,067 53 


21,786 34 


883 76 


22,670 10 


Sterling . 


15,189 29 


2,521 96 


17,711 25 


12,083 30 


2,726 42 


14,809 72 


Stockbridge . 


12,594 61 


1,853 09 


14,447 70 


26,838 07 


1,358 51 


28,196 58 


Stoneham 


11,871 15 


1,604 54 


13,475 69 


29,019 31 


31,950 30 


60,969 61 


Stoughton 


9,352 78 


1,479 17 


10,831 95 


38,878 88 


9,261 68 


48,140 56 


Sturbridge 


6,684 01 


471 97 


7,155 98 


10,310 12 


1,234 78 


11,544 90 


Sudbury 


35,619 09 


295 19 


35,914 28 


156,066 98 


1,907 75 


157,974 73 


Sunderland 


5,402 88 


228 42 


5,631 30 


24,913 93 


778 96 


25,692 89 


Sutton . 


8,861 58 


1,130 45 


9,992 03 


13,740 20 


3,302 82 


17,043 02 


Swampscott . 


22,810 68 


454 86 


23,265 54 


21,183 64 


532 00 


21,715 64 


Swansea . 


15,582 55 


7,815 23 


23,397 78 


62,686 68 


13,705 96 


76,392 64 


Taunton 


19,497 80 


1,554 89 


21,052 69 


67,488 90 


3,144 86 


70,633 76 


Templeton 


14,793 69 


1,331 96 


16,125 65 


42,862 67 


5,567 62 


48,430 29 


Tewksbury 


18,317 73 


172 61 


18,490 34 


155,147 45 


4,259 99 


159,407 44 


Tisbury . 


5,975 48 


13 80 


5,989 28 


23,669 19 


279 73 


23,948 92 


Townsend 


12,209 71 


1,740 53 


13,950 24 


27,032 89 


5,231 48 


32,264 37 


Truro 


11,410 04 


2,182 54 


13,592 58 


12,710 72 


36,337 79 


49,048 51 


Tyngsborough 


20,690 11 


4,427 80 


25,117 91 


26,134 71 


3,465 53 


29,600 24 


Upton 


590 25 


1,380 51 


1,970 76 


407 18 


1,639 84 


2,047 02 


Uxbridge 


9,008 19 


2,765 77 


11,773 96 


13,644 16 


2,429 53 


16,073 69 


Wales 


2,175 98 


133 66 


2,309 64 


720 67 


1,594 63 


2,315 30 


Walpole . 


20,198 87 


1,933 71 


22,132 58 


57,040 41 


5,029 11 


62,069 52 


Ware 


12,223 35 


1,062 01 


13,285 36 


8,709 39 


3,998 04 


12,707 43 


Ware ham 


24,488 49 


2,008 61 


26,497 10 


88,832 19 


5,636 64 


94,468 83 


Warren . 


22,125 99 


395 10 


22,521 09 


119,005 09 


763 63 


119,768 72 


Washington 


- 


- 


- 


- 


159 25 


159 25 


Watertown 


8,348 96 


698 41 


9,047 37 


11,642 92 


542 79 


12,185 71 


Wayland 


42,586 33 


355 52 


42,941 85 


38,988 81 


1,962 69 


40,951 50 


Webster 


4,407 98 


817 71 


5,225 69 


12,621 67 


807 18 


13,428 85 


Wellesley 


5,857 18 


353 47 


6,210 65 


18,337 97 


117 98 


18,455 95 


Well fleet . 


11,640 61 


1,886 19 


13,526 80 


10,615 77 


58,959 16 


69,574 93 


Wenham 


13,349 88 


695 12 


14,045 00 


20,217 18 


34,452 57 


54,669 75 


West borough . 


6,667 43 


869 27 


7,536 70 


6,808 25 


2,433 65 


9,241 90 


West Boy 1st on 


10,711 94 


512 44 


11,224 38 


43,229 91 


765 29 


43,995 20 


West Bridgewater . 


22,278 34 


460 01 


22,738 35 


8,715 85 


2,144 24 


10,860 09 


West Brookfield 


18,113 24 


672 36 


18,785 60 


44,918 64 


1,603 50 


46,522 14 


Westfield 


35,918 71 


2,365 03 


38,283 74 


45,888 89 


3,186 67 


49,075 56 


Westford 


13,698 53 


2,164 85 


15,863 38 


12,971 08 


6,399 54 


19,370 62 


Westminster . 


29,735 16 


2,555 34 


32,290 50 


76,097 16 


5,765 14 


81,862 30 


West Newbury 


23,019 56 


1,963 47 


24,983 03 


16,366 97 


4,987 99 


21,354 96 


Weston . 


24,876 62 


736 40 


25,613 02 


42,141 46 


1,148 22 


43,289 68 


Westport 


37,604 25 


2,088 85 


39,693 10 


55,128 63 


6,041 80 


61,170 43 


West Springfield 


11,510 28 


74 90 


11,585 18 


50,354 26 


694 33 


51,048 59 


West Tisbury 


5,755 47 


633 78 


6,389 25 


19,030 35 


1,223 61 


20,253 96 


Westwood 


12,888 39 


92 20 


12,980 59 


14,576 75 


268 23 


14,844 98 


Weymouth 


32,413 77 


2,455 09 


34,868 86 


89,359 64 


11,652 73 


101,012 37 


Whately . 


15,841 61 


446 27 


16,287 88 


47,590 14 


933 38 


48,523 52 


Whitman 


6,549 34 


499 15 


7,048 49 


17,453 27 


2,289 23 


19,742 50 


Wilbraham 


26,769 11 


730 04 


27,499 15 


99,450 99 


1,458 67 


100,909 66 


Williamsburg . 


8,634 98 


832 16 


9,467 14 


32,464 74 


2,741 66 


35,206 40 


Williamstown 


14,711 21 


288 49 


14,999 70 


43,862 06 


514 92 


44,376 98 


Wilmington 


5,391 96 


749 14 


6,141 10 


20,521 09 


55,008 01 


75,529 10 


Winchendon . 


12,574 96 


3,474 63 


16,049 59 


29,376 65 


11,466 45 


40,843 10 


Winchester 


11,425 88 


1,470 74 


12,896 62 


15,099 56 


1,769 02 


16,868 58 


Windsor . 


2,560 73 


150 00 


2,710 73 


4,909 56 


1,098 90 


6,008 46 


Woburn . 


11,965 37 


2,889 58 


14,854 95 


11,511 02 


1,901 20 


13,412 22 


Worcester 


32,887 65 


1,281 07 


34,168 72 


73,893 13 


1,934 54 


75,827 67 


Wrentham 


17,723 24 


2,121 58 


19,844 82 


63,587 08 


5,734 24 


69,321 32 


Yarmouth, North 1 
Yarmouth, South / 


22,393 67 


1,875 38 


24,269 05 


51,159 33 


5,642 37 


56,801 70 


Totals 


$3,850,201 74 


$358,889 44 


$4,209,091 18 


$9,257,793 46 


$1,619,694 17 


$10,877,487 63 



HIGHWAYS. 



47 





Average Expenditure per 










Mile in 1920. 




Average 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 


Amount to 










be assessed on 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


Cities and 
Towns under 

1920 Ex- 
penditures. 


$5,444 39 


$84 81 


$67 45 


$152 26 


$275 24 


3.618 


$275 44 


158,507 01 


319 60 


1,940 38 


2,259 98 


1,538 93 


4.857 


971 40 


150,792 47 


412 12 


470 04 


882 16 


961 03 


9.918 


1,983 60 


51,751 86 


176 94 


205 79 


382 73 


3,206 83 


1.583 


302 93 


3,199 77 


288 21 


745 38 


1,033 59 


305 37 


.708 


35 40 


20,681 49 


256 20 


438 72 


694 92 


428 66 


3.691 


738 20 


12,459 56 


92 01 


159 75 


251 76 


549 48 


1.357 


170 82 


110,356 86 


305 79 


544 13 


849 92 


918 09 


7.371 


3,132 40 


. 46,737 63 


144 69 


288 81 


433 50 


947 08 


3.060 


612 00 


35,520 97 


309 10 


334 16 


643 26 


369 04 


8.159 


815 90 


42,644 28 


435 71 


319 42 


755 13 


972 39 


4.253 


850 60 


74,445 30 


1,014 24 


20,196 14 


21,210 38 


2,283 03 


1.582 


3,164 00 


58,972 51 


265 99 


1,665 47 


1,931 46 


903 50 


5.561 


5,370 42 


18,700 88 


200 58 


524 77 


725 35 ! 


516 38 


2.353 


235 30 


193.889 01 


57 72 


373 04 


430 76 


1,967 22 


5.114 


511 40 


31,324 19 


57 52 


196 16 


253 68 


766 07 


3.971 


198 55 


27,035 05 


163 88 


478 81 


642 69 


593 91 


6.898 


689 80 


44,981 18 


305 07 


356 81 


661 88 


1,419 36 


1.491 


493 43 


99.790 42 


826 13 


1,448 83 


2,274 96 


1,081 81 


9.460 


1,892 00 


91,686 45 


169 93 


343 70 


513 63 


796 54 


9.150 


2,349 87 


64,555 94 


234 17 


978 84 


1,213 01 


780 01 


5.688 


1,137 60 


177,897 78 


27 90 


688 65 


716 55 


1,695 13 


6.186 


1,237 20 


29,938 20 


7 16 


145 24 


152 40 


612 45 


1.926 


146 76 


46,214 61 


288 45 


867 00 


1,155 45 


425 95 


6.034 


603 40 


62,641 09 


216 20 


3,599 58 


3,815 78 


800 01 


10.095 


504 75 


54,718 15 


638 01 


499 36 


1,137 37 


503 22 


6.940 


347 00 


4.017 78 


395 22 


469 46 


864 68 1 


775 03 


3.493 


349 30 


27,847 65 


574 41 


504 58 


1,078 99 


444 92 


4.815 


2,597 65 


4,624 94 


26 21 


312 67 


338 88 


226 86 


5.100 


255 00 


84,202 10 


366 58 


953 38 


1,319 96 . 


778 76 


5.275 


3,481 41 


25,992 79 


254 31 


957 39 


1,211 70 ! 


390 10 


4.176 


2,530 02 


120,965 93 


151 75 


425 86 


577 61 ' 


915 87 


13.236 


3,822 62 


142,289 81 


79 98 


154 58 


234 56 i 


1,741 57 


4.940 


579 36 


159 25 


- 


75 58 


75 58 ! 


283 36 


2.107 


79 63 


21.233 08 


821 62 


638 58 


1,460 20 J 


1,033 64 


.850 


620 60 


83,893 35 


124 27 


686 02 


810 29 


1,597 45 


2.861 


572 20 


18,654 54 


314 50 


310 45 


624 95 


787 54 


2.6G0 


812 44 


24,660 60 


300 57 


100 32 


400 89 


1,087 21 


1.176 


235 72 


83,101 73 


256 07 


8,004 23 


8,260 30 


1,004 33 


7.366 


368 30 


68,714 75 


394 51 


19,553 10 


19,947 61 


1,981 33 


1.762 


352 40 


16,778 60 


290 63 


813 66 


1,104 29 


332 67 


2.991 


598 20 


55,219 58 


119 09 


177 85 


296 94 


1,104 22 


4.303 


430 30 


33,598 44 


145 53 


678 34 


823 87 


579 42 


3.161 


316 10 


65,307 74 


237 67 


566 81 


804 48 


1,323 35 


2.829 


282 90 


87,359 30 


407 20 


548 66 


955 86 


692 02 


5.808 


2,775 85 


35,234 00 


437 34 


1,292 84 


1,730 18 


500 14 


4.950 


990 00 


114,152 80 


318 34 


718 22 


1,036 56 


1,004 13 


8.027 


802 70 


46,337 99 


384 62 


977 08 


1,361 70 


515 91 


5.105 


510 50 


68,902 70 


233 63 


364 28 


597 91 


1,041 58 


3.152 


942 31 


100,863 53 


455 28 


1,316 87 


1,772 15 


949 34 


4.588 


917 60 


62,633 77 


27 70 


256 78 


284 48 


1,402 27 


2.704 


384 62 


26,643 21 


118 29 


228 38 


346 67 


247 35 


5.358 


267 90 


27,825 57 


86 08 


250 45 


336 53 


1,297 04 


1.071 


180 22 


135,881 23 


269 28 


1,278 13 


1,547 41 


1,097 35 


9.117 


7,053 91 


64,811 40 


110 85 


231 84 


342 69 


957 62 


4.026 


201 30 


26,790 99 


125 13 


573 89 


699 02 


442 45 


3.989 


1,394 19 


128,408 81 


144 42 


288 56 


432 98 


1,319 38 


5.055 


1,011 00 


44,673 54 


310 51 


1,023 01 


1,333 52 


826 15 


2.680 


268 00 


59,376 68 


103 22 


184 23 


287 45 


1,317 84 


2.795 


401 71 


81,670 20 


203 63 


14,951 89 


15,155 52 


2,129 60 


3.679 


735 80 


56,892 69 


472 35 


1,558 79 


2,031 14 


1,719 38 


7.356 


1,471 20 


29,765 20 


753 45 


906 26 


1,659 71 


740 87 


1.952 


1,619 88 


8,719 19 


30 64 


224 45 


255 09 


185 09 


4.896 


244 80 


28,267 17 


526 72 


346 55 


873 27 


523 69 


5.486 


2,395 39 


109,993 39 


314 60 


475 08 


789 68 


1,354 11 


4.072 


1,607 81 


89,166 14 


222 96 


602 53 


825 49 


681 99 


9.517 


951 70 


81,070 75 


213 16 


641 32 


854 48 


386 74 


8.798 


1,759 60 


$15,086,578 81 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,306.837 


$312,204 69 



48 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Special Highway Improvements authorized by Acts 

passed in 1920. 

Paxton and Rutland. 

This act (chapter 519) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $10,000 in the construction of the main 
county highway, beginning at the present improved highway 
in Paxton, running through West Rutland and ending at the 
present State highway in West Rutland in the town of Rut- 
land; $3,500 of said sum to be paid by Worcester County and 
$1,500 by the town of Rutland. 

No work has been done during the year except to make 
survey. 

Clinton. 

This act (chapter 520) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $35,000, 50 per cent thereof to be paid 
by the town of Clinton and 50 per cent by the county of 
Worcester, in the construction and improvement of the Clinton- 
West Boylston road, so called, in Clinton. 

No work has been done during the year, except to make 
survey. 

Expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $127.75. 

H olden. 

This act (chapter 521) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $40,000, 65 per cent of said sum to be 
paid by Worcester County and 35 per cent by the town of 
Holden, in the construction and improvement of a highway in 
the town of Holden, beginning at the end of the improved road 
leading from Holden Center to Quinnapoxett Village in said 
town and extending toward the town of Princeton. 

No work has been done during the year, except to make 
survey. 

Expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $385.66. 



HIGHWAYS. 49 



Templeton. 

This act (chapter 522) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $6,000, 50 per cent of said sum to be 
paid by the town of Templeton and 50 per cent by Worcester 
County, for the construction or improvement of a highway in 
Templeton known as Royalston Road, leading from the village 
of Baldwinsville to the dividing line between Templeton and 
Phillipston. 

The work done in 1920 consisted in the construction of an 
8-inch gravel road, 18 feet wide, beginning at a point 5,550 feet 
easterly from the Phillipston line and extending in an easterly 
direction 2,700 feet. 

The total expenditure was $5,905.48. 

Westborough. 

This act (chapter 536) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $14,000, 50 per cent of said sum to be 
paid by the town of Westborough and 50 per cent by Worcester 
County, for the improvement of the main highway in the town 
of Westborough from the corner of East Main and Lyman 
streets, continuing towards Westborough Center. 

No work has been done during the year, except to make 
survey. 

Chester, Middlefield, Peru and Hinsdale. 

This act (chapter 566) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 the sum of $60,000 for the construction and im- 
provement of the highway leading from Chester Village in the 
town of Chester to Middlefield Center, and thence through a 
part of the town of Peru to the town of Hinsdale. Of the 
amount authorized to be expended by this act, $10,000 shall 
be paid by Middlefield, and such sums by Chester, Peru and 
Hinsdale as may be agreed upon by said towns, respectively, 
and said Division. The amounts required of Middlefield, 
Chester, Peru and Hinsdale shall be paid on order of the Divi- 
sion, and said towns are authorized to receive gifts or contribu- 
tions from individuals or corporations to be used toward pro- 
viding the sums required of them under the provisions of this 



50 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

act. It was also provided that the counties of Berkshire, 
Hampden and Hampshire shall each repay to the Common- 
wealth 25 per cent of the cost to the Commonwealth of that 
part of the road which is situated in said counties, respectively. 

No work has been done during the year r except to make 
survey. 

Expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $318.94. 

Bland] or d, Otis, Monterey and Great Barrington. 

This act (chapter 571) authorized the Division to expend 
during 1920 not exceeding $25,000 for the construction of a 
highway from the village of Blandford in the town of Bland- 
ford through the villages of East Otis, Otis, West Otis and 
Monterey to the town of Great Barrington, 50 per cent of said 
sum to be repaid by the counties of Berkshire and Hampden 
in proportion to the length of road improved under this act 
in each of said counties. 

No work has been done during the year. 



HIGHWAYS. 51 



WORK DONE OR EXPENDITURES MADE DURING 1920 
UNDER SPECIAL AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE 
PREVIOUS TO 1920. 

1915. 

Southwick. 

Chapter 221, General Acts, authorized the construction and 
completion of highways in the five western counties of the 
State. 

March 4, 1920, contract made with the Lane Construction 
Corporation of Meriden, Conn., for the construction of 7,900 
feet of road, consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide, 
in Southwick. The proposal amounted to $41,679. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, 95 per cent of the work had been completed. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $44,008.84. 

1916. 

Hingham. 

Chapter 213, General Acts, authorized and directed the Mas- 
sachusetts Highway Commission to construct and maintain a 
State highway in Hingham from the easterly end of the State 
highway on Lincoln Street in Hingham to the boundary lines 
of Cohasset and Hull at West's Corner. 

Apportionment of expense: 37J per cent to the Common- 
wealth; 25 per cent to the county of Plymouth; 37 J per cent 
to the town of Hingham. 

Expenditure during 1920, $4,919.86. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $88,605.70. 

1918. 

Leominster. 

Chapter 236, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend during 1918 the sum of $20,000 
in the construction or improvement of Prospect Street in 
Leominster, beginning at the town line of Lunenburg and 
extending westerly towards North Leominster. 



52 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Apportionment of expense: $10,000 to be paid by Leominster; 
$5,000 to be paid by Worcester County; and $5,000 to be paid 
by the Commonwealth. 

Expenditure during 1920, $4,695. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $5,221.45. 

1919. 

Leominster. 

Chapter 231, Special Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend during 1919 a further sum of 
$24,000 in the construction or improvement of Prospect Street 
in Leominster, beginning at the town line of Lunenburg and 
extending westerly toward North Leominster. 

Apportionment of expense: $12,000 to be paid by Leominster 
and $6,000 to be paid by Worcester County. 

Expenditure during 1920, $5,778.55. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $5,778.55. 

Holland and Brimfield. 

Chapter 232, Special Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend during 1919 the sum of $10,000 
in the construction or improvement of Holland Road in Holland 
and Brimfield, beginning at the intersection of Holland Road 
with the highway running from Brimfield to Sturbridge, east- 
erly of Brimfield Center, and thence following the line of Hol- 
land Road to Holland Center. One-fourth of the expense of 
constructing said highway to be repaid by Hampden County 
to the Commonwealth. 

Expenditure during 1920, $5,392.35. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $7,903.42. 

H olden. 
Chapter 233, Special Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend the sum of $20,000 in the con- 
struction or improvement of a highway between Holden and 
the W T achusett Mountain State Reservation, beginning about 
eight-tenths of a mile south of Princeton Center and continuing 
toward the village of Quinnapoxett, provided Princeton appro- 



HIGHWAYS. 53 

priates $10,000 to be used with the $20,000 allowed by the 
Commonwealth; Worcester County to repay to the Common- 
wealth one-third of said $20,000 in the manner provided by 
section 13 of Part 1 of chapter 344, General Acts of 1917. The 
towns of Princeton and Holden to assume and pay all land 
and grade damages. 

Expenditure during 1920, $25,852.57. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $26,495.10. 

Middle field. 

Chapter 240, Special Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend the sum of $10,000 during 
1919' in the reconstruction and improvement of the highway 
located in Middlefield and extending from the northerly line of 
Chester to the southerly line of Worthington through that 
portion of Middlefield known as Smith's Hollow and substan- 
tially parallel with the middle branch of the Westfield River. 

Expenditure during 1920, $7,113.73. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $9,960.73. 

Westborough. 

Chapter 335, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to improve during 1919 the highway be- 
tween Westborough and the village of North Grafton, which 
serves the Grafton State Hospital, and to expend the sum of 
$12,000. Upon the completion of said improvement, one-third 
of the cost to be reimbursed to the Commonwealth by Worces- 
ter County, and one-third by Westborough and Grafton in pro- 
portion to the amount expended in said towns, as determined 
by the said commission. 

Expenditure during 1920, $4,000. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $4,000. 

North Brookfield. 

Chapter 336, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend the sum of $25,000 during 
1919 in the construction and improvement of the highway from 
North Brookfield to New Braintree from the end of the mac- 



54 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

adam highway in North Brookfield, at the junction of the Oak- 
ham road with the road leading from North Brookfield to New 
Braintree, to the point on the New Braintree road to which 
a macadam highway has been constructed on the North Brook- 
field side of the New Braintree and North Brookfield line. 

Apportionment of expense: 50 per cent by the Common- 
wealth; 25 per cent by Worcester County; and 25 per cent 
by North Brookfield. 

Expenditure during 1920, $16,531.10. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $17,958.30. 

Hubbardston and Rutland. 

Chapter 337, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend during 1919 the sum of $50,000 
in addition to the amount authorized for the same purpose by 
chapter 210, General Acts of 1916, in the further construction 
and improvement of the highway from Gardner to Worcester 
in the towns of Hubbardston and Rutland. 

Apportionment of cost: 40 per cent to be paid by the Com- 
monwealth; 40 per cent by Worcester County, and 20 per 
cent by Hubbardston for that part of the highway which is in 
Hubbardston, and 20 per cent by Rutland for that part of the 
highway which is in Rutland. 

Sept. 14, 1920, contract made with Hinman & Rudiger of 
Sturbridge for the construction of 9,400 feet of gravel road 15 
feet wide. The proposal amounted to $27,530.60. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, 60 per cent of the work had been completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $27,954.64. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $28,225.42. 

Holyoke. 

Chapter 338, General x\cts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to construct a section of highway in 
Holyoke along and over the Easthampton road from Northamp- 
ton Street in Holyoke to the Holyoke-Easthampton line in 
Holyoke, and to expend a sum not exceeding $50,000, Holyoke 
to reimburse the Commonwealth for one-half, and Hampden 
County for one-quarter of the amount expended. 



HIGHWAYS. 55 

Sept. 14, 1920, contract made with Daniel O'Connell's Sons 
of Holyoke for the construction of 5,032 feet of highway con- 
sisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $50,609. 

To Dec. 1, 1920, 5 per cent of the work had been completed. 

Expenditure during 1920, $1,488.28. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $1,878.56. 

Milford-Southboroagh-Hopkinton. 

Chapter 339, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to expend the sum of $10,000 during 
1919 in the construction and improvement of the highway lead- 
ing from the present highway in Milford, at a point near the 
Milford Pine Grove Cemetery, through Hopkinton, to the pres- 
ent highway in Southborough at the point where the highway 
from Hopkinton enters Southborough at Cordaville railroad 
bridge. Of the amount expended, $5,000 to be paid by the 
Commonwealth, and, upon the completion of the work, $2,500 
to be paid by Worcester County into the treasury of the Com- 
monwealth, and $2,500 to be paid by Milford. 

April 28, 1920, contract made with Cenedella & Co. of Mil- 
ford for the construction of 1,900 feet of road, consisting of 
bituminous macadam 17 feet wide, in Milford. 

Work completed Sept. 28, 1920. 

Expenditure during 1920, $7,354.25. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $7,437.85. 

Dracut-Methuen. 

Chapter 340, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission further to construct and improve a con- 
tinuous section of highway from Lawrence to Lowell in the 
town of Dracut and city of Methuen, beginning at the junction 
of Broadway and Arlington Street, continuing by Broadway 
and Arlington Street in Dracut, and thence by Broadway and 
North Lowell Street in Methuen, and to expend not exceeding 
$20,000, of which amount 25 per cent is to be repaid by the 
county within which the road is situated. 

No expenditure made to Dec. 1, 1920. 



56 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Norton. 

Chapter 348, General Acts, authorized the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission to construct as a State highway a part 
of the highway in Norton beginning at a point on Main Street 
near Woodward's Mill where the present State highway ends, 
and continuing through Main Street to the Easton town line, 
and to expend a sum not exceeding $20,000. Upon the com- 
pletion of said highway Bristol County shall, upon request of 
said commission, giving a statement of the total cost of said 
highway, pay into the treasury of the Commonwealth 35 per 
cent of the total cost. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $119.23. 

JYilliamstown. 

Chapter 62, Resolves, provided for an investigation relative 
to the construction of a State highway in the town of Williams- 
town. The Division submitted a report on this matter under 
date of Jan. 7, 1920 (House No. 600 of 1920), its conclusion 
being that public necessity and convenience do not require the 
laying out and construction of a State highway in this town as 
set forth in the resolve. 

Expenditure during 1920, $82.70. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $256.83. 



HIGHWAYS. 57 



FEDERAL AID IN CONSTRUCTING HIGHWAYS. 

An act to provide that the "United States shall aid the 
States in the construction of rural post roads, and for other 
purposes/' was passed by Congress, and approved July 11, 1916, 
the Federal government appropriating and making available 
during the five following years the total amount of $75,000,000 
for use in aiding the States in the construction of certain roads 
agreed upon between the Secretary of Agriculture and the high- 
way departments of the various States. 

This act provided that one-half of the cost of constructing 
any project agreed upon between the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the State highway department shall be provided for from 
the State or local funds, and that the amount that the Federal 
government shall pay on any mile of road shall not exceed 
$10,000 a mile for its half, exclusive of the cost of bridges of 
more than 20 feet clear span. 

By chapter 67, General Acts of 1917, Massachusetts accepted 
the provisions of the act of Congress aforesaid and authorized 
the Massachusetts Highway Commission to make contracts 
and agreements "and to do all other things necessary to co- 
operate with the United States government in the construction 
and maintenance of rural highways, under the provisions of 
the act of congress aforesaid, and to submit such plans, esti- 
mates, and programs for the improvement of highways as will 
meet the requirements of the secretary of agriculture under the 
provisions of the said act, and for this purpose it is hereby 
authorized to use any moneys which it may have available for 
the construction and maintenance of state highways, whether 
appropriated from the treasury of the commonwealth, or placed 
at the disposal of the commission by the provisions of section 
thirty of chapter five hundred and thirty-four of the acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and nine and the amendments 
thereof." 

A general scheme, comprising several different routes which 
the State proposed to adopt in the expenditure of Federal aid, 



58 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

was submitted in March, 1917, and was approved by the 
Federal authorities. 

Chapter 18, General Acts of 1918, amended section 2 of 
chapter 67, General Acts of 1917, as follows: — 

The Massachusetts highway commission is hereby authorized to make 
all contracts and agreements, and to do all other things necessary to 
co-operate with the United States government in the construction and 
maintenance of rural highways, under the provisions of the act of con- 
gress aforesaid, and to submit such plans, estimates, and programs for 
the improvement of highways as will meet the requirements of the secre- 
tary of agriculture under the provisions of the said act, and for this pur- 
pose it is hereby authorized to use any moneys which it may have avail- 
able for the construction and maintenance of state highways. The said 
commission is also authorized to use any money heretofore or hereafter 
appropriated by the general court for the construction of specific high- 
ways or routes, the money appropriated from the fees obtained from the 
licensing of motor vehicles, or from towns under the provisions of section 
twenty-three of Part 1 of chapter three hundred and forty-four of the 
General Acts of nineteen hundred and seventeen, and also any money 
received from the federal government on account of the construction of 
highways. The said commission is also authorized for the purpose of 
securing federal aid to use any money appropriated by a county, city 
or town for the construction of a road or any part thereof for which fed- 
eral aid may be secured, and to make any contracts or agreements in- 
volving the expenditure of said money, provided the county commis- 
sioners of the county or the selectmen or duly authorized officials of the 
city or town have agreed in writing to pay the money thus appropriated 
upon the order of said commission. Said commission is also authorized 
to maintain the roads constructed under the provisions of this act or of 
said act of congress, from any money appropriated by the general court 
for the maintenance of state highways or for the repair or maintenance 
of town or county ways. 

Chapter 18 aforesaid also provided that "the treasurer and 
receiver general is hereby authorized to receive from the 
United States any and all sums of money payable to this com- 
monwealth under any act of congress for the construction of 
any highways therein. The sums so received shall be expended 
upon the order or approval of the Massachusetts highway com- 
mission without specific appropriation.'' 

Special Acts of 1918, chapter 18, further authorized the 
Massachusetts Highway Commission "to expend during the 



HIGHWAYS. 59 

years nineteen hundred and eighteen, nineteen hundred and 
nineteen and nineteen hundred and twenty the unexpended 
balance of the five million dollars authorized for the construc- 
tion of state highways by chapter seven hundred and four of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and twelve, and the unexpended 
balances of such appropriations or authorizations as have been 
heretofore made by the general court for the construction of 
specific highways or routes, in accordance with the several pro- 
visions of law originally authorizing said expenditures." 

Chapter 89, General Acts of 1919, further amended chapter 
67, General Acts of 1917, as amended by chapter 18, General 
Acts of 1918, by adding a new section providing that "the 
Massachusetts highway commission is hereby authorized to 
make any agreements or contracts that may be required to 
secure federal aid in the construction of highways under the 
provisions of the act of congress aforesaid, and of all other acts 
in amendment thereof, or in addition thereto, and may, in such 
agreements or contracts, provide, among other things, for such 
labor preferences to honorably discharged soldiers, sailors and 
marines as are made necessary by federal legislation, and may 
provide that no other preference or discrimination among citi- 
zens of the United States shall be made in connection with the 
expenditure of any money received from the federal govern- 
ment by virtue of the said legislation." 

The act of Congress, approved July 11, 1916, was amended 
by an "Act making appropriations for the services of the Post 
Office Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, and 
for other purposes," approved Feb. 28, 1919. Under the 
amended act additional amounts were appropriated as follows: 
the sum of $50,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919; 
$75,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920; $75,000,- 
000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921. 

The act of 1919 also provided that section 6 of said act of 
Congress, approved July 11, 1916, "be further amended so 
that the limitation of payments not to exceed $10,000 per mile, 
exclusive of the cost of bridges of more than twenty feet clear 
span, which the Secretary of Agriculture may make, be, and 
the same is, increased to $20,000 per mile." 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



The following allotments have thus far been made to 
Massachusetts: — 



For fiscal year ending June 30, 1917 
For fiscal year ending June 30, 1918 
For fiscal year ending June 30, 1919 
For fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 
For fiscal year ending June 30, 1921 



$73,850 95 

147,701 90 

958,145 15 

1,400,078 27 

1,472,788 83 



Total $4,052,565 10 

The total amount received by Massachusetts from 1916 to 
Nov. 30, 1920, is $481,210.69. 

Projects to the number of 17 have been prepared in addi- 
tion to those shown in the report of the Massachusetts High- 
way Commission for 1919. The total mileage included in the 
various Federal-aid road projects in this State, from the com- 
mencement of work of this character to Nov. 30, 1920, inclusive, 
is 170.231. The mileage in the various counties is: — 



County. 


Miles. 


Barnstable 

Berkshire .............. 


30.605 
26.533 


Bristol .............. 


7.054 


Essex ............... 


19.470 


Franklin ... ........ 


15.984 


Hampden .............. 


6.563 


Middlesex ............... 


14:445 
20.211 


Norfolk .............. 


2.420 


Plymouth .............. 


7.088 


Worcester .............. 


19.858 








■ 
Total . 


170.231 







HIGHWAYS. 



61 



Statement of Federal-aid Road Projects. x 



No. 


Town. 


Miles. 


Amount of 

Federal Aid 

involved. 


Amount 
received. 


Remarks. 


1 


Acushnet-Fairhaven 


2.182 


$21,820 00 2 


$21,820 00 


Work completed. 


2 


Hanover . 




2.708 


19,480 36 2 


19,480 36 


Work completed. 


3 


Malden-Melrose-Saugus 




1.162 


11,620 00 2 


11,620 00 


Work completed. 


4 


Danvers 




1.325 


15,460 22 2 


15,460 22 


Work completed. 


5 


Windsor-Dalton 




3.240 


59,216 30 2 


32,764 45 


Work under way. 


6 


Sandwich . 




1.818 


10,678 02 2 


- 


Work completed. 


7 


Cummington 




4.659 


86,816 53 2 


4,426 45 


Work under way. 


8 


Athol-Petersham 




7.016 


90,319 04 2 


64,570 95 


Work completed. 


9 


Saugus 




3.122 


65,472 27 2 


27,037 78 


Work under way. 


10 


Braintree . 




2.420 


40,687 37 2 


29,805 08 


Work completed. 


11 


Concord-Acton-Littleton 




4.849 


79,106 22 2 


62,985 35 


Work completed. 


12 


Ipswich 




2.173 


21,851 50 2 


- 


Work completed. 


13 


Littleton-Groton 




6.450 


130,504 25 2 


8,392 11 


Work under way. 


14 


Barnstable 




3.331 


26,062 57 2 


15,605 51 


Work completed. 


15 


Norwell-Hingham 




4.380 


61,169 35 2 


12,942 44 


Work under way. 


17 


Lynnfield-Peabody . 




1.794 


35,880 00 2 


- 


Work under way. 


18 


Lunenburg 




2.797 


55,940 00 2 


13,636 44 


Work under way. 


19 


Taunton 




2.116 


42,320 00 2 


14,243 13 


Work under way. 


20 


Tewksbury-Wilmington 




2.909 


35,211 82 2 


26,098 73 


Work completed. 


21 


Pittsfield-Hancock . 




3.637 


72,740 00 2 


32,011 69 


Work under way. 


22 


Greenfield-Bernardston 




6.426 


57,519 71 2 


9,263 45 


Work under way. 


23 


Great Barrington 




2.124 


31,573 87 2 


- 


Work completed. 


24 


Seekonk 




2.756 


19,527 75 2 


13,666 84 


Work completed. 


25 


Billerica 




.597 


38,389 77 2 


3,389 34 


Work under way. 


26 


Greenfield-Shelburne (section 1 


5.134 


102,680 00 2 


24,527 28 


Work under way. 




Greenfield-Shelburne (section 2 


4.424 


88,480 00 


- 


Project approved. 


27 


Hamilton-Wenham . 


1.766 


22,756 08 2 


- 


Work completed. 


28 


Lanes borough : 












Section A 


.990 


19,780 00 2 


3,274 86 


Work completed. 




Section B 




2.680 


53,800 00 2 


- 


- 


29 


Ware .... 




2.626 


46,557 55 2 


7,688 99 


Work under way. 


30 


Brimfield . 




4.238 


75,889 00 2 


- 


- 


31 


Danvers-Peabody 




1.107 


22,140 00 2 


- 


Work completed. 


32 


Huntington 




3.078 


86,948 26 2 


6,499 24 


Work under way. 



1 All of these projects are now, or will be later, State highways. 2 Signed agreements. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Statement of Federal-aid Road Projects x — Concluded. 



No. 


Town. 


Miles. 


Amount of 

Federal Aid 

involved. 


Amount 
received. 


Remarks. 


33 


Acton- Littleton : 












Section A 


2.182 


$43,640 00 2 


- 


Work under way. 




Section B 


1.624 


32,480 00 


- 


- 


34 


Dudley 


1.359 


27,180 00 2 


- 


Work under way. 


35 


Haverhill-Methuen . 


4.544 


90,880 00 


- 


Project approved. 


36 


Eastham-Wellfleet-Truro- 
Pro vincetown : 
Section A 


10.690 


91,347 85 2 


_ 


Work under way. 




Section B 


6.719 


75,936 70 2 


- 


- 




Section C 


8.047 


86,130 57 2 


- 


Work under way. 


37 


Egremont 


1.164 


20,579 07 2 


- 


Work under way. 


38 


Peabody-Danvers 


2.827 


56,540 00 2 


- 


Work under way. 


39 
40 


Williamstown-New Ash for d- 

Lanesborough. 
East Brookfield 


7.923 
1.011 


147,195 00 
20,220 00 2 


_ 


Project approved. 
Contract awarded. 


41 


Ashby 


1.250 


11,517 00 2 


- 


- 


42 


Washington .... 


2.291 


45,820 00 2 


- 


- 


43 


Leicester ..... 


.638 


12,760 00 2 


- 


Work under way. 


44 


Goshen-Cummington- Windsor 


6.566 


131,320 00 


- 


Project approved. 


45 


Palmer 


2.325 


39,880 00 


- 


Contract awarded. 


46 


Upton- Hopedale 


4.261 


85,220 00 


- 


Project approved. 


47 


Barre-Oakham .... 


1.738 


34,760 00 


- 


Project approved. 


48 


Templeton .... 
Totals 


1.038 


14,850 00 


- 


Project forwarded. 




170.231 


$2,716,654 00 


$481,210 69 





1 All of these projects are now, or will be later, State highways. 2 Signed agreements. 



HIGHWAYS. 63 

FEDERAL DISTRIBUTION OF ROAD EQUIPMENT, ETC. 

The Division has received from the Secretary of Agriculture 
certain road equipment, etc., in accordance with an act of 
Congress approved Feb. 28, 1919, which provides, in section 7, 
"That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized 
in his discretion to transfer to the Secretary of Agriculture all 
available war material, equipment, and supplies not needed for 
the purposes of the War Department, but suitable for use in the 
improvement of highways, and that the same be distributed 
among the highway departments of the several States to be 
used on roads constructed in whole or in part by Federal aid, 
such distribution to be made upon a value basis of distribu- 
tion the same as provided by the Federal aid road act, ap- 
proved July 11, 1916: Provided, That the Secretary of Agri- 
culture, at his discretion, may reserve from such distribution 
not to exceed 10 per centum of such material, equipment, and 
supplies for use in the construction of national forest roads 
or other roads constructed under his direct supervision. " 

A schedule of what has been received during the fiscal year 
ending Nov. 30, 1920, follows: — 

Miscellaneous Equipment. 

Tanks, 165-gallon G. 1 18 

Pump, Barnes plunger and 6 H. P. gas engine, complete ... 1 

Plow turn 1 

Double tree for plow 1 

Wheelbarrows 17 

Single trees 2 

Hoist, chain, 1 T. C. & M. Cyclone, black 1 

Tables, folding, 24" x 36" 2 

Pumps, hand D. A. piston force (Ward Company) .... 28 

Derrick, 5-ton, No. 36113 (14 pieces) 1 

Brooms, stable, with handles 167 

Shelters, trench (complete) 5 

Sheets, roofing metal 1,162 

Sets, chains, skid, Stanley, 40" x 6" 13 

Lanterns, railroad 151 

Chains, skid, Packard 60 

Bows, wood for tops, Nash Quad driver's seat 78 

Bodies, Ford delivery, with tops and fenders 6 

Brooms, stable 50 

Lanterns, folding, galvanized iron 93 



64 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Shovels 7 

Picks 9 

Picks, no handles 15 

Handles, pick 740 

Heavy aviation spare parts (lot) 1 

Nash Quad spare parts (lot) 2 

Nash Quad springs, complete 61 

Nash Quad tops (lot) 1 

Nash Quad steel wheels, unfinished 100 

Packard clutch covers (lot) 1 

Packard transmission covers (lot) 3 

Selden, spare parts, steering spider (lot) ...... 1 

Tires (lot) 1 

Shovels, entrenching E. D 37 

Corona typewriters 7 

Chains, Stanley (hook skid), 40" x 6" (sets) 5 

Forges, portable (complete) 21 

Wagons, sprinkling, 450 gallons, pump and hose .... 3 

Transit Engineer No. 8672, Young & Son 1 

Tapes, steel, 100', Lufkin 5 

Engine, hoisting steam, three drum, 7 x 10 1 

Carts, push, concrete, J yard 4 

Wagons, dump 6 

Drill, steam, complete, Sergeant 1 

Hoist, steam, double, drum, Lambert No. 306 1 

Hoist, steam, three drum, No. 3413 1 

Engine, gas, horizontal, 10 H. P 1 

Carts, water, two-wheel, 150 gallon capacity 7 

Derrick, hand hoist 1 

Pump power, complete with spare parts 1 

Trucks and Passenger Cars received during the Year. 

Packard 3-ton trucks 39 

Federal 3-ton trucks 13 

Pierce Arrow 2-ton trucks 31 

Pierce Arrow 5-ton trucks 18 

Nash Quads, 2-ton trucks . 10 

G. M. C. |-ton trucks 5 

Ford ambulances 18 

Ford touring cars 4 

Oldsmobile touring cars 2 

Total 140 

Received in 1919 82 

Total received, two years 222 



HIGHWAYS. 



65 



BRIDGES. 

The following is a detailed list of bridges built or contracted 
for in 1920, and a list of bridges contemplated, for which de- 
signs and plans have been prepared : — 



Bridges built or contracted for. 



Town. 



Locality. 



Character of Structure. 



Bemardston 

Billerica 

Cummington 

Huntington 

Oxford 

Saugus 

Ware . 

Warwick 

Williamstown 

Woburn 
Worthington 



Over Shattuek Brook 
Over Couch Brook 
Over Concord River . 

Over branch of Westfield 

River. 
Norwich bridge, over north 

branch of Westfield River 
Over Mannexet River 

Over Saugus River 

Over Muddy River 

Over Orcutt Brook 

Over Roaring Brook 

Over Green River 

Over Aberjona River 

Over Little River 



34§-foot reinforced concrete beam and 

slab. 
32-foot reinforced concrete beam and slab. 

3 spans reinforced concrete arch ; 2 spans 

of 50 feet and 1 span of 65 feet. 
100-foot reinforced concrete arch. 

3 spans reinforced concrete arch ; 2 spans 
of 55 feet and 1 span of 75 feet. 

15§-foot reinforced concrete arch (exten- 
sion). 

22-foot reinforced concrete beam and slab. 

20j-foot span reinforced concrete beam 

and slab. 
36-foot reinforced concrete arch. 

135-foot span reinforced beam and slab. 

39-foot reinforced beam and slab. 

18-foot reinforced beam and slab. 

20-foot reinforced beam and slab. 



Contemplated Bridges. 



Town. 



Locality. 



Character of Structure. 



Amherst 


Over Mill River . 


Barre .... 


Over Canal . 


Becket 
Bernardston 


Over west branch of West 

field River. 
Over Falls River 


Brimfield . 


Over Mill Brook . 


Cummington 


Over Westfield River . 


Dana .... 


Over branch of Ware River 


Goshen 


Over Stones Brook 




Over Swift River 


Grafton 


Over Blackstone River 


Holden 


Over Quinnapoxett River 



60-foot reinforced concrete arch. 

14-foot 8f-inch slab. 

3 bridges, respectively, 25.4 feet, 27 feet 
and 26| feet, reinforced beam and slab. 
60-foot reinforced concrete arch. 

17.9-foot reinforced concrete beam and 
slab. 

3 bridges; 80-foot reinforced concrete 
arch; 38-foot beam and slab, and 36- 
foot reinforced arch. 

19-foot reinforced beam and slab. 

30-foot reinforced concrete beam and slab. 
36-foot reinforced beam and slab. 
70-foot reinforced concrete arch. 
35-foot reinforced concrete beam and slab. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contemplated Bridges — Concluded. 



Town. 



Locality. 



Character of Structure. 



Lanesborough 
New Ashford 



Northbridge 
Topsfield . 
Westfield . 
Williamsburg 



Williamstown 



Over Town Brook 

Over Thompsons Brook 

Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over Green River 

Over Green River 

Over Green River 

Over Green River 

Over Green River 

Over Blackstone River 

Over Ipswich River . 

Frog Hole bridge, so called 

Over Meekins Brook . 

Over Mill River . 

Over Mill River . 

Over Hemlock branch 



18-foot reinforced concrete beam and slab. 
10-foot 2^-inch reinforced slab. 
24-foot beam and slab. 
28-foot beam and slab. 
16-foot beam and slab. 
16-foot beam and slab. 
16-foot beam and slab. 
23^-foot beam and slab. 

Reinforced concrete arch; 2 spans of 50 
feet each. 

32-foot stone arch, — repairs, new span- 
drel, walls and wings. 

35-foot reinforced beam and slab. 

40-foot reinforced beam and slab. 

60-foot reinforced concrete arch. 

68-foot reinforced concrete arch (Hayden- 

ville). 
34-foot beam and slab. 



Bridge over the Merrimack River between Newburyport 

and Salisbury. 

The charge of this bridge was placed in the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission, and the same made a State highway by 
the provisions of chapter 716, Acts of 1912, which also pro- 
vided that the expense of keeping the bridge in good repair for 
travel, of operating the draw and of maintaining the bridge 
shall be paid by the Commonwealth. 

The expense for 1920 was $7,957.60. 

The total expense from 1912 to 1920, inclusive, was $62,703.56. 



Bridge over Taunton Great River between Fall River 

and Somerset. 

The charge of this bridge was placed in the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission, and the same made a State highway by 
the provisions of chapter 717, Acts of 1912, which also pro- 
vided that the expense of keeping the bridge in good repair 
for travel, and of operating the draw and maintaining the 



HIGHWAYS. 67 

bridge shall be paid by the Commonwealth; furthermore, that 
the expense incurred and to be incurred by the county of 
Bristol in restoring the bridge to a sound condition and in 
making it suitable for travel shall be borne by the Com- 
monwealth. 

The expense for 1920 was $8,068.19. 

The total expense from 1912 to 1920, inclusive, was $138,709.23. 



68 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENT OF TOWN AND 

COUNTY WAYS. 

Chapter 525, Acts of 1910, makes available for the mainte- 
nance and improvement of town and county ways a part of the 
fees received from the licensing of motor vehicles, and amends 
section 30 of chapter 534 of the Acts of 1909 as follows: — 

The fees and fines received under the provisions of this act, together 
with all other fees received by the commission or any other person under 
the laws of the commonwealth relating to the use and operation of motor 
vehicles, shall be paid monthly by the secretary of the commission or by 
the person collecting the same into the treasury of the commonwealth, 
and shall be used by the commission for such expenses as may be author- 
ized by the general court to carry out the provisions of law regulating 
the use of motor vehicles; and the balance shall be expended, under the 
direction of the commission, for the maintenance of state highways with- 
out specific appropriation by the general court, in addition to all sums 
already or hereafter appropriated by the general court for the same 
purpose, and an amount not exceeding twenty per cent of said balance 
may be expended in any one year by said commission in repairing, im- 
proving, constructing or maintaining town or county highways which 
are or may be used as through routes or which connect one city or town 
with another and where the selectmen of the town apply, by petition in 
writing, to have said improvement, construction or repair made, and said 
commission may spend any part of said money on said work, together 
with any money which any town may appropriate for said purpose to 
be used on the same highway, and said way shall remain a town or county 
way. . . . 

By chapter 276, General Acts of 1917, section 30, aforesaid, 
was further amended so that if county commissioners, as well 
as the selectmen of towns, apply by petition to have improve- 
ment, construction or repairs made, the Commission may ex- 
pend on the work any money which a county, as well as a 
town, may appropriate. This chapter also provides that the 
provisions of section 16 of chapter 47 of the Revised Laws shall 
not apply to any expenditure made under authority of said 
section 30 out of the said fees and fines, and that the counties 
shall not be required to repay to the Commonwealth any part 
of such expenditures. 



HIGHWAYS. 



69 



During the year the Division has contracted for work to be 
done in the towns named in the following table which also 
shows the type of road, the length contracted for, and the 
allotments or contributions by the State, towns and counties : — 



Maintenance and Improvement of Town and County Ways. 

(Chapter 525, Acts of 1910.) 





Contributions. 




Length 


Town. 








Type of Road. 


Con- 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Acton 


$6,000 00 


$6,000 00 


$6,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,475 


Andover . 






18,000 00 


18,000 00 


18,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


7,550 


Ashfield . 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Gravel . 


1,500 


Ashland . 






1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Water-bound macadam . 


1,440 


Ashland . 






1,170 13 


1,170 13 


1,170 12 


Bridge . 


- 


Ayer 






12,250 00 


17,250 00 


12,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,000 


Barre 






2,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,600 


Bedford . 






500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel . 


700 


Bellingham 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel . 


1,500 


Berkley . 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Repairs and oiling . 


25,561 


Bolton 






2,000 00 


1,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel . 


2,350 


Boxford . 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel . 


800 


Bridgewater 






3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,275 


Buckland 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Gravel . 


650 


Canton 






20,000 00 


20,000 00 


20,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,300 


Carver 






4,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


Bituminous gravel . 


5,580 


Chelmsford 






12,000 00 


12,000 00 


12,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


6,300 


Concord . 






3,000 00 


13,000 00 


3,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,400 


Dana 






600 00 


200 00 


600 00 


Bridge and gravel road . 


50 


Danvers . 






4,250 00 


4,250 00 


4,250 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,550 


Dartmouth 






5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


4,235 


Dennis 






3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Repairs and oiling . 


34,320 


Dighton . 






3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,200 


Dracut 






2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


500 


Dudley . 






29,055 00 


8,500 00 


12,500 00 


Cement concrete 


7,174 


Dunstable 






1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


Repairs and oiling . 


29,000 


Duxbury 






10,000 00 


30,000 00 


- 


Sand and asphalt 


14,520 


East ham pton 






2,000 00 


2,000 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,500 


East Bridgewater 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Bituminous gravel . 


2,317 


East Longmeadow 




3,500 00 


7,300 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,000 


Essex 




8,000 00 


8,000 00 


8,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,095 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Maintenance and Improvement of Town and County Ways — 

Continued. 





Contributions. 




Length 


Town. 








Type of Road. 


Con- 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Framingham . 


$2,000 00 


$2,000 00 


$2,000 00 


Gravel . 


2,000 


Framingham 




3,200 00 


3,200 00 


3,200 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,618 


Franklin . 




4,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


Gravel . 


3,200 


Freetown 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,560 


Freetown 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,058 


Georgetown 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Gravel . 


3,400 


Groveland 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Gravel . 


12,740 


Hadley . 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,750 


Halifax . 




3,600 00 


4,800 00 


3,600 00 


Bituminous gravel . 


4,281 


Hanson . 




2,250 00 


2,250 00 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


2,487 


Harvard . 




4,300 00 


4,300 00 


4,300 00 


Gravel . 


4,000 


Hatfield . 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,200 


Holbrook 




6,000 00 


6,000 00 


6,000 00 


Bituminous gravel . 


3,355 


Holliston 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,810 


Hopkinton 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Water-bound macadam . 


1,700 


Hudson . 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel . 


3,450 


Ipswich . 




400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


Repairs . 


8,950 


Kingston 




37,000 00 


12,500 00 


12,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


8,454 


Leicester . 




8,000 00 


8,000 00 


8,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


4,613 


Lexington 




10,500 00 


10,500 00 


10,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,793 


Lincoln . 




9,000 00 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,550 


Littleton . 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel .... 


1,100 


Littleton . 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Repairs .... 


20,000 


Lynnfield 




7,500 00 


7,500 00 


7,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,800 


Maynard . 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


2,500 


Medfield . 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,800 


Medway . 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,500 


Millbury . 




4,666 67 


9,333 33 


- 


f Cement concrete . 

( Bituminous macadam . 


800 
560 


Millis 




2,000 00 


3,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


3,500 


Montague 




500 00 


500 00 


- 


Repairs and oiling . 


5,730 


Montague 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


4,000 


Norfolk . 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


5,700 


North Brookfield . 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,550 


North Reading 


900 00 


900 00 


900 00 


Repairs and oiling . 


40,878 



HIGHWAYS. 



71 



Maintenance and Improvement op Town and County Ways 

Continued. 





Contributions. 




Length 


Town. 








Type of Road. 


Con- 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


North Reading 


$300 00 


$300 00 


$300 00 


Water-bound macadam . 


250 


Norwood . 




3,804 64 


7,609 29 


3,804 64 


Bituminous macadam 


3,390 


Oxford . 






4,300 00 


3,650 00 


3,650 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,105 


Paxton 






5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,225 


Pembroke 






8,000 00 


8,000 00 


8,000 00 


Bituminous gravel . 


7,050 


Pepperell 






700 00 


700 00 


700 00 


Gravel . 


950 


Petersham 






2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,700 


Plympton 






8,000 00 


8,000 00 


8,000 00 


Bituminous gravel . 


6,353 


Plympton 






500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel . 


574 


Princeton 






14,322 00 


10,741 00 


7,161 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,980 


Randolph 






10,000 00 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


Cement concrete 


2,000 


Reading . 






1,300 00 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 


Bituminous macadam 


650 


Rehoboth 






1,500 00 


1,500 00 


- 


Gravel . . . . 


2,025 


Richmond 






2,500 00 


1,500 00 


- 


Gravel . 


1,600 


Rowley . 






500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


900 


Salisbury 






18,000 00 


18,000 00 


18,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


10,450 


Sandwich 






1,000 00 


- 


- 


Repairs and oiling . 


14,500 


Saugus 






5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


f Bituminous macadam . 
( Repairs and oiling 


1,600 
10,400 


Sharon 






3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,518 


Sheffield . 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Repairs and oiling . 


15,000 


Sherborn . 






1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,400 


Shrewsbury 






5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,950 


Sterling . 






2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,100 


Stoneham 






1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


650 


Stow 






1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Water-bound macadam . 


1,000 


Stow 






1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


2,500 


Sudbury . 






2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,100 


Tisbury . 






8,000 00 


- 


- 


Sand and asphalt 


119 


Tyngsborough 




500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


900 


Tyngsborough 




300 00 


200 00 


300 00 


Repairs .... 


7,400 


Wakefield 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,450 


Wareham-Bourne 




20,000 00 


- 


190,000 00 


Bridge over Cohasset Nar- 


- 


Wareham-Bourne 
Washington 




40,000 00 
1,000 00 


- 


- 


rows. 

Bituminous macadam ap- 
proaches to bridge. 

Water-bound macadam . 


1,693 
2,300 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Maintenance and Impkovement of Town and County Ways — 

Concluded. 



Town. 


Contributions. 


Type of Road. 


Length 
Con- 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Wayland . 

Wayland . 

West Bridgewater . 

Westfield . 

Westport . 

West Springfield 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Wilbraham 

Wrentham 


$2,500 00 
2,550 00 
3,000 00 

50,000 00 
3,000 00 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,800 00 

150 00 


$2,500 00 
5,405 00 
3,000 00 

50,000 00 
3,000 00 

20,000 00 

8,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,800 00 

150 00 


$2,500 00 
2,550 00 

50,000 00 
3,000 00 

4,000 00 
5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 
Repairs and oiling . 
Bituminous gravel . 
Bituminous macadam 
Bituminous macadam 
Cement concrete 
Bituminous macadam 
Bituminous macadam 
Grading .... 
Grading . 


584 

50,688 

1,600 

26,055 

4,700 

2,500 

3,050 

2,790 

1,700 

200 



The expenditures during the year in various counties for the 
maintenance and improvement of town and county ways, under 
chapter 525, Acts of 1910, were: — 



County. 

Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 



Amount. 



$6,641 93 
31,557 36 
32,942 56 
96,845 45 
10,518 99 
14,332 90 
9,314 97 
92,469 86 
61,561 66 
65,629 69 
96,581 10 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: 



HIGHWAYS. 



73 



Barnstable County. 

Bourne $5,469 75 

Dennis 9 23 

Harwich 300 00 

Provincetown 218 79 

Sandwich 644 16 

Berkshire County. 

Cheshire 13,092 41 

Egremont 711 76 

Florida 1,000 00 

Hancock 7,485 86 

Lanesborough 1,985 80 

New Ashford 1,171 65 

Richmond 5,339 04 

Williamstown 770 84 

Bristol County. 

Berkley 979 04 

Dartmouth 8,925 84 

Dighton 3,000 00 

Freetown 10,500 00 

Raynham 1,500 00 

Rehoboth 1,243 77 

Somerset 2,236 58 

Swansea 1,557 33 

Westport 3,000 00 

Essex County. 

Andover 34,398 75 

Boxford 1,500 00 

Danvers 8,154 96 

Essex 1,300 00 

Georgetown 3,207 17 

Groveland 2,230 00 

Ipswich 3,685 16 

Lynnfield 7,721 75 

Middleton 10,117 25 

Newbury 4,152 10 

North Andover 2,135 72 

Rowley 5,296 32 

Saugus 8,009 27 

Topsfield 4,937 00 



74 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Franklin County. 

Ashfield . . . .-. $1,000 00 

Buckland 1,000 00 

Montague 5,565 33 

New Salem 2,953 66 

Hampden County. 

Agawam 9,594 92 

Brimfield 363 77 

East Longmeadow 1,500 00 

Monson 226 00 

West Springfield 2,648 21 

Hampshire County. 

Hadley 7,184 02 

Pelham 516 00 

Williamsburg 1,614 95 

Middlesex County. 

Acton 5,201 99 

Ashby 85 

Ashland 2,057 62 

Ayer 12,072 71 

Bedford 733 33 

Chelmsford 14,458 33 

Concord 3,857 15 

Dracut 3,600 00 

Dunstable 1,500 00 

Framingham 4,283 01 

Holliston 2,149 34 

Hopkinton 3,000 00 

Hudson 511 27 

Lexington 5,000 00 

Lincoln 10,178 00 

Littleton 1,287 90 

Maynard 1,475 08 

North Reading 1,200 00 

Pepperell 644 89 

Reading 1,045 47 

Sherborn 2,975 00 

Shirley 204 20 

Stoneham 1,400 00 

Stow 1,732 70 

Sudbury 3,002 48 

Tewksbury 1,202 88 



HIGHWAYS. 75 

Tyngsborough $722 45 

Wakefield 2,992 97 

Wayland 3,980 24 

Norfolk County. 

Bellingham . . . 1,000 00 

Canton 15,590 00 

Franklin 3,992 42 

Holbrook 7,996 96 

Medway ' . 502 58 

Millis 1,000 00 

Norfolk 1,410 00 

Norwood 3,804 64 

Randolph 13,221 43 

Sharon 1,958 36 

Walpole 1,428 50 

Westwood 4,233 20 

Weymouth 3,972 00 

Wrentham 1,451 57 

Plymouth County. 

Bridgewater 2,995 77 

Carver 4,436 11 

East Bridgewater 9,615 64 

Halifax 60 00 

Hanson 3,792 90 

Kingston 9,981 87 

Lakeville 9,256 24 

Pembroke 11,923 33 

Plympton 9,947 58 

Wareham 2,945 25 

West Bridgewater 675 00 

Worcester County. 

Barre 1,990 12 

Berlin 1,500 00 

Bolton 1,560 00 

Brookfield 924 94 

Dana 600 00 

Dudley 41,437 96 

Hardwick 1,500 00 

Harvard 3,777 81 

Holden 282 25 

Leicester 6,720 00 

Millbury 3,783 35 

North Brookfield 3,000 00 



76 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Oxford S439 37 

Paxton 7,075 76 

Petersham 1 40 

Princeton 180 59 

Shrewsbury 4,333 33 

Southbridge . 13,878 09 

Sturbridge 3,265 00 

Westborough 331 13 

Total $518,396 47 



HIGHWAYS. 77 



HIGHWAYS IN THE FIVE WESTERN COUNTIES. 

Chapter 221, General Acts of 1915, provided for the con- 
struction and completion, during 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918, of 
about 163 miles of highway on 17 different specified routes 
located in 38 towns and 1 city in the five western counties of 
the Commonwealth, namely, Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, 
Hampshire and Worcester; for the county commissioners of 
the county in which the road was located to lay out the high- 
way according to plans prepared by the Massachusetts High- 
way Commission; for payment by the county of land and 
grade damages; for the issue of $2,000,000 bonds to be used 
for the construction of these highways, and for the repayment 
to the Commonwealth, by the counties in which any of the 
highways were constructed, of 25 per cent of the expenditures 
in that county. 

Chapter 572, Acts of 1920, in addition to authorizing the 
Division to expend an additional sum of $1,000,000 before 
Nov. 30, 1924, for the purpose of completing the construction 
of certain highways in the five western counties of the State, 
under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts of 
1915, provides that one-fourth of any money which may be 
expended under the provisions of section 1 thereof for a high- 
way in any county shall be repaid by the county to the Com- 
monwealth in such instalments and at such times, within six 
years thereafter, as the Division, with the approval of the 
Auditor of the Commonwealth, shall determine; also that a 
sum equal to the money so repaid shall before Nov. 30, 1926, 
be expended by the Division without specific appropriation, 
either in completing the highways mentioned in said chapter 
221, or in improving a highway in any town in the five western 
counties that is not situated upon one of the highways men- 
tioned in said act, provided that the valuation of the town 
does not exceed $1,000,000, the highway so improved to be a 
main highway connecting such town with its railroad station, 
with a main through highway, or with an adjoining city or 
town. 



78 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The total expenditures during the year for the construction 
of highways in Sheffield and Great Barrington; Dalton, Wind- 
sor and Goshen; Washington and Hinsdale; Huntington and 
Worthington; Peru; Belchertown and Ware; Agawam and 
Southwick; Ashfield and Goshen; Gill; Orange and Warwick; 
Wales; Chesterfield, Northampton and Williamsburg were 
$212,443.77, details of which follow: — 

Route No. 1. 

Sheffield . $260 93 

Great Barrington 12 15 

Route No. 2. 

Dalton 10 11 

Windsor 31 72 

Goshen 1,230 99 

Route No. If.. 

Washington 18,614 48 

Hinsdale 35,751 79 

Route No. 5. 

Huntington 136 00 

Worthington 42,211 98 

Route No. 6. 
Peru 4,762 32 

Route No. 8. 

Belchertown 19,070 69 

Ware 120 14 

Route No. 9. 

Agawam 73 56 

Southwick 50,355 28 

Route No. 10. 

Ashfield 4,153 34 

Goshen 3 00 

Route No. 11. 
Gill 13,438 39 






HIGHWAYS. 79 



Route No. 14. 

Orange $10 21 

Warwick 14,630 85 

Route No. 16. 

Wales 3,958 36 

Route No. 17. 

Chesterfield 3,283 09 

Northampton 20 62 

Williamsburg 303 77 

Total $212,443 77 



; 



80 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR OF WAYS IN CERTAIN TOWNS. 

Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 23, provides 
that — 

The Massachusetts highway commission shall allot for and expend in 
such towns the valuation of which does not exceed one million dollars, 
and in such amounts as it determines, five per cent of the amount appro- 
priated each year for the construction of state highways, to be used in 
constructing and repairing ways in such towns; and it shall not be a 
condition precedent that such towns shall make any appropriation or 
contribution in excess of the usual annual appropriations for highway 
purposes to become eligible for an expenditure under this section. Said 
commission may also allot for and expend in such towns for like purposes, 
in addition to any expenditure hereinbefore provided for, a further amount 
of five per cent of said amount appropriated, if such towns appropriate 
or contribute, to be expended under the provisions of this section, an 
amount equal to the amount allotted by the commission. Said commis- 
sion may also allot and expend a further amount of not more than five per 
cent of said amount appropriated each year for the construction of state 
highways in towns the valuation of which exceeds one million dollars, in 
such amounts as it determines, if such towns appropriate or contribute, to 
be expended under the provisions of this section, an amount, in addition 
to the average annual appropriations for repairs of highways in such towns 
for the preceding five years, exclusive of appropriations or contributions 
under this section, equal to the amount allotted by said commission. No 
town the valuation of which is less than one million dollars, and which 
makes no appropriation or contribution under the provisions of this sec- 
tion, shall receive in any one year more than forty per cent of its average 
annual appropriations for highway purposes for the preceding five years: 
provided, however, that said commission may allot in any year a sum not 
exceeding four hundred dollars to any such town, the said average annual 
appropriation of which does not exceed one thousand dollars. Such allot- 
ments and expenditures shall be made only upon the petition of the select- 
men of the towns, and the provisions of section thirteen of Part 1 of this 
act shall apply thereto, but a way constructed or repaired under the 
provisions of this section shall not thereby become a state highway. 

During the year the Division has contracted for work to be 
done in the towns named in the following table which also 
shows the type of road, the length contracted for, and the 
allotments or contributions by the State, towns and counties: — 



HIGHWAYS. 



81 



Construction and Repair of Ways in Certain Towns. 

(Chapter 344, General Acts of 1917, Part 1, section 23.) 





Contributions. 




Length 


Town. 








Type of Road. 


con- 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Agawam 


$10,000 


$10,000 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


3,700 


Blandford 


1,250 


1,250 


- 


Water-bound macadam . 


1,700 


Boxborough 


600 


600 


- 


Gravel .... 


600 


Chester 


1,000 


1,000 


- 


Gravel . 


1,788 


Colrain 


1,600 


1,600 


- 


Gravel .... 


2,000 


Dana 


1,000 


1,000 


$1,000 


Gravel .... 


1,750 


Falmouth 


10,000 


10,000 


- 


Sand and asphalt . 


8,460 


Gardner . 


2,500 


2,500 


- 


Gravel . . . ■ 


2,350 


Gran by . 


1,000 


1,000 


- 


Gravel .... 


600 


Lakeville 


3,500 


3,500 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,430 


Ludlow . 


750 


1,500 


- 


Gravel .... 


700 


Mendon . 


500 


500 


- 


Gravel .... 


700 


Monson . 


2,500 


2,500 


- 


Gravel .... 


1,300 


Nantucket 


15,000 


15,000 


- 


Sand and oil . 


13,214 


New Marlborough . 


1,500 


1,500 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,950 


Orange 


1,000 


1,000 


- 


Gravel .... 


1,700 


Palmer 


30,000 


30,000 


- 


Cement concrete 


4,211 


Prescott . 
Raynham 


1,000 
2,000 


1,000 
2,000 


_ 


Gravel road and two 

bridges reconstructed. 
Water-bound macadam . 


250 
1,390 


Shutesbury 


200 


200 


- 


Gravel .... 


400 


Southwick 


500 


500 


- 


Gravel .... 


900 


Tyringham 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


Water-bound macadam . 


1,400 


Wilbraham 


5,000 


5,000 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,350 



The total expenditures during the year in various towns in 
Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol, Franklin, Hampshire, Middlesex, 
Nantucket, Plymouth and Worcester counties were $65,475.47. 
Details of the foregoing expenditures follow : — ■ 

Barnstable County. 
Falmouth $14,500 00 

Berkshire County. 

Florida 450 00 

Hin sdale ' 103 76 



82 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

New Marlborough $2,931 90 

Tyringham 900 00 

Williamstown 21,194 67 

Bristol County. 

Raynham . . . . ' . 2,000 00 

Franklin County. 

Orange 1,000 00 

Shutesbury 200 00 

Wendell 600 00 

Hampshire County. 

Prescott 1,225 00 

Middlesex County. 

Boxborough 600 00 

Nantucket County. 

Nantucket 13,250 00 

Plymouth County. 

Bridgewater 1,462 25 

Lakeville 3,500 00 

Worcester County. 

Dana 1,000 00 

Mendon 500 00 

Oakham 57 89 

Total $65,475 47 



HIGHWAYS. 83 



REPAIR AND IMPROVEMENT OF PUBLIC WAYS, EXCLUSIVE 
OF STATE HIGHWAYS, IN CERTAIN TOWNS. 

Chapter 155, General Acts of 1918, provides: — 

Section 1. There may be expended from the treasury of the common- 
wealth for the repair and improvement of public ways, exclusive of state 
highways, in towns the valuation of which, determined as provided in 
section four, is less than three million dollars and in which the amount 
of such valuation, divided by the number of miles of such public ways, 
hereinafter referred to as the road mileage valuation, is less than fifty 
thousand dollars, such sums, not exceeding fifty dollars per mile, as the 
general court may from time to time appropriate therefor: provided, 
however, that such towns shall contribute or make available for use in 
connection therewith the following graded amounts for each and every 
mile of said public ways within their respective limits: — 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of less than five thousand 
dollars, twelve dollars and fifty cents. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of five thousand dollars and less 
than seven thousand five hundred dollars, fifteen dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of seven thousand five hundred 
dollars and less than ten thousand dollars, twenty-five dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of ten thousand dollars and less 
than fifteen thousand dollars, forty dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of fifteen thousand dollars and 
less than twenty thousand dollars, fifty dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of twenty thousand dollars and 
less than thirty thousand dollars, seventy-five dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of thirty thousand dollars and 
less than forty thousand dollars, one hundred dollars. 

Towns having a road mileage valuation of forty thousand dollars and 
less than fifty thousand dollars, one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

The amounts appropriated as aforesaid and contributed by the towns 
shall be expended under the direction of the Massachusetts highway com- 
mission on such ways as the commission and the selectmen of the towns 
may from time to time agree upon. 

Section 2. The said expenditures shall be made only upon the written 
petition of the selectmen of the towns, containing such information as the 
said commission may require. No work shall be done under this act in 
any district where dwelling houses or structures devoted to business are 
situated at intervals averaging less than two hundred feet for the distance 
of a quarter of a mile. 

Section 3. The said towns may contract with the said commission for 
the performance of the work authorized hereby; or, if the right to do so is 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



waived by the selectmen, the commission may have the work done by such 
persons and in such manner as it may determine, in which event the towns 
shall pay their proportionate part of the expense when and as ordered by 
said commission. The cost of any materials, machinery or tools purchased 
by the commission for or on account of the work in any particular town 
shall be considered as a part of the expenditures in such town under this 
act; and such machinery or tools shall be the property of the common- 
wealth. 

Section 4. Said commission shall from time to time determine, as 
nearly as possible, the number of miles of such public ways, in towns the 
valuation of which is less than three million dollars, and shall inform the 
selectmen of such towns of the contributions required under this act, the 
valuation of each town to be determined by the apportionments made for 
the collection of state and county taxes. . . . 

During the year the Division has contracted for work to be 
done in the towns named in the following table which also 
shows the allotments or contributions by the State and towns : — 



Town. 




Acton . 

Alford 

Ashburnham 

Ashby 

Ashfield 

Becket 

Belchertown 

Bellingham 

Berlin . 

Blandford . 

Bolton 

Boxborough 

Boxford 

Boylston 

Brimfield . 

Carlisle 

Charlemont 

Charlton 

Chester 

Chesterfield 



HIGHWAYS. 



85 



Town. 



Allotments. 



State. 



Town. 



Colrain 

Conway 

Cummington 

Dana . 

Douglas 

Dunstable 

Eastham 

Enfield 

Florida 

Gill . 

Goshen 

Gran by 

Granville 

Greenwich 

Hampden 

Hancock 

Harvard 

Hawley 

Heath 

Hinsdale 

Holland 

Hopkinton 

Hubbardston 

Huntington 

Leverett 

Leyden 

Littleton 

Medway 

Mendon 

Middlefield 

Monson 

Monterey . 

Montgomery 

New Braintree 

New Marlborough 

New Salem 

Northfield . 

Norton 



$3,000 
3,000 
2,950 
2,500 
3,000 
1,750 
1,950 
1,850 
2,050 
1,800 
1,550 
2,300 
3,000 
1,950 
1,700 
1,450 
3,000 
2,450 
2,600 
1,650 
1,500 
3,000 
3,000 
2,050 
1,900 
2,050 
1,850 
2,000 
2,150 
1,800 
3,000 
2,500 
1,600 
2,750 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,850 



$3,600 
2,960 
2,000 
1,250 
5,475 
1,400 
1,560 
2,500 
3,075 
1,800 

800 
2,500 
2,500 
1,500 
1,360 
2,000 
6,390 
1,000 
1,400 
2,500 

375 
5,175 
3,500 
3,200 
2,000 
1,000 
3,700 
5,000 
2,150 

700 
6,300 
1,250 

800 
1,375 
4,780 
1,500 
5,325 
5,700 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Town. 



Allotments. 


State. 


Town. 


$2,350 . 


SI, 700 


2,950 


1,400 


1,650 


1,320 


2,000 


1,650 


2,250 


900 


2,050 


1,100 


2,400 


1,300 


1,700 


1,800 


1,950 


800 


3,000 


5,000 


2,200 


3,300 


3,000 


4,040 


2,050 


1,600 


3,000 


3,900 


3,000 


3,640 


3,000 


3,000 


2,800 


700 


2,500 


8,500 


2,000 


1,000 


3,000 


2,440 


2,850 


6,500 


3,000 


5,000 


2,250 


3,375 


3,000 


3,520 


1,750 


2,625 


3,000 


4,500 


3,000 


8,300 


2,100 


1,200 


3,000 


3,800 


1,150 


1,150 


2,750 


2,750 


2,550 


1,000 


2,350 


2,400 


2,100 


1,000 


3,000 


3,440 


1,950 


3,000 


2,100 


4,200 


3,000 


825 


3,000 


2,500 



Oakham 

Otis . 

Paxton 

Pelham 

Peru . 

Phillipston . 

Plainfield . 

Plympton . 

Prescott 

Princeton 

Raynham . 

Rehoboth . 

Rov.e, 

Royalston . 

Rutland 

Sandisfield . 

Savoy . 

Sherborn 

Shutesbury 

Southampton 

Southwick . 

Sterling 

Stow . 

Sturbridge . 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

Templeton 

Tolland 

Townsend . 

Tyringham 

Warwick 

Washington 

Wendell 

Westhampton 

Westminster 

Whately 

Williamsburg 

Windsor 

Worthington 






HIGHWAYS. 



87 



The expenditures during 1920, in various counties, for the 
repair and improvement of public ways, exclusive of State 
highways, under chapter 155, General Acts of 1918, were: — 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 



$1,768 69 

32,108 00 

8,371 59 

2,500 00 

43,568 02 

24,677 34 

35,912 24 

22,037 12 

3,950 00 

1,700 00 

53,357 57 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 



Barnstable County, 

Eastham $1,768 69 

Berkshire County. 

Alford 1,040 76 

Becket 2,147 99 

Florida 2,325 38 

Hancock . 2,207 56 

Hinsdale 1,409 07 

Monterey 1,548 88 

New Marlborough 2,650 00 

Otis 3,366 00 

Peru 2,167 84 

Sandisfield 2,792 84 

Savoy 2,798 26 

Tyringham 1,150 00 

Washington 2,421 01 

West Stockbridge 1,031 08 

Windsor 3,045 33 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Bristol County. 



Norton 

Raynham 

Rehoboth 



Boxford 



Ashfield . 

Charlemont 

Colrain 

Conway 

Gill . 

Hawley 

Heath 

Leverett 

Leyden 

Monroe 

New Salem 

Northfield 

Rowe 

Shutesbury 

Sunderland 

Warwick . 

Wendell . 

Whately . 



Blandford 
Brimfield . 
Chester . 
Granville . 
Hampden 
Holland . 
Monson . 
Montgomery 
Southwick 
Tolland . 



Essex County. 
Franklin County. 



Hampden County. 



$5,350 00 


521 59 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


3,182 97 


2,517 12 


3,088 10 


2,738 87 


1,879 90 


2,456 11 


2,050 00 


3,675 00 


2,169 51 


669 16 


3,205 52 


2,900 00 


2,224 16 


2,142 11 


1,300 00 


2,742 65 


2,676 84 


1,950 00 


2,692 20 


2,834 15 


2,628 88 


3,179 01 


1,747 13 


•1,658 55 


2,950 00 


2,181 61 


3,166 17 


1,639 64 



Hampshire County. 

Belchertown 3,082 40 

Chesterfield 2,856 08 

Cummington , . . 2,150 00 



HIGHWAYS. 



89 



Enfield . 

Goshen 

Granby . 

Greenwich 

Hatfield . 

Huntington 

Middlefield 

Pelham 

Plainfield . 

Prescott . 

Southampton 

Westhampton 

Williamsburg 

Worthington 



Acton 

Ashby 

Boxborough 

Carlisle 

Dunstable 

Hopkinton 

Littleton . 

Sherborn . 

Stow . 

Townsend 



Middlesex County. 



$2,274 55 


1,436 01 


2,060 70 


2,300 96 


436 78 


1,450 50 


1,879 68 


2,316 35 


2,654 96 


2,377 25 


3,097 59 


1,005 41 


1,983 02 


2,550 00 


2,825 00 


2,775 00 


1,050 00 


2,999 62 


1,750 00 


1,850 00 


1,400 00 


2,475 00 


2,212 50 


2,700 00 



Norfolk County. 

Bellingham 1,950 00 

Medway 2,000 00 

Plymouth County. 

Plympton 1,700 00 

Worcester County. 

Ashbumham 2,800 00 

Berlin 1,849 32 

Bolton 2,682 50 

Boylston 1,532 50 

Charlton 2,437 58 

Dana 2,500 00 

Douglas 3,000 00 

Harvard 2,475 00 

Hubbardston 2,952 83 

Mendon 2,000 00 



90 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

New Braintree $1,525 00 

Oakham 2,150 00 

Paxton 1,325 0O 

Phillipston 2,052 91 

Princeton 2,019 1$ 

Royalston ". 2,795 22 

Rutland 2,791 91 

Sterling 2,777 96 

Sturbridge 3,000 00 

Sutton 3,000 00 

Templeton 2,890 65 

Westminster 2,800 00 

Total $229,950 57 



HIGHWAYS. 91 



KEEPING CERTAIN HIGHWAYS OPEN DURING THE WINTER 

MONTHS. 

Chapter 488 of the Acts of 1920, approved May 19, 1920, 
provides: — 

That the Department of Public Works may co-operate with city 
and town authorities in keeping certain highways open and reasonably 
passable for vehicles during the winter months, and for this purpose may 
accept financial or other assistance from individuals, partnerships or 
corporations. 

That the co-operation of the Commonwealth shall consist in furnishing 
such equipment as the Department deems suitable, and the supervision of 
the use of the same. 

That the highways to be kept open and passable under this act shall 
be selected by said Department with regard to their importance for com- 
mercial uses and with regard to the co-operation and aid to be rendered 
by cities and towns, individuals, partnerships and corporations in carry- 
ing on the work, but no highway shall be selected therefor without the 
approval of the municipal authorities. 

That work carried on under this act shall be supplemental to work 
undertaken and performed by cities and towns under existing laws. 

That nothing in this act shall render the Commonwealth liable to 
pay any damages which it is not liable to pay under existing laws, nor 
shall this act in any way relieve cities and towns from keeping their high- 
ways clear from ice and snow as required by existing laws. 

That for the purposes of this act said Department may expend 
during 1920 and 1921 from such sums as may hereafter be appropriated 
by the General Court a sum not exceeding $50,000. 

Up to Dec. 1, 1920, sixty-two snow plow^s were purchased 
by the Division, and 12,600 feet of snow fence made, delivered 
and set up. The fence was distributed as follows: — 

Feet. 

Pittsfield-Lenox 600 

Pittsfield-New York line 600 

Northampton-Greenfield 1,260 

Westfield-Woronoco : 660 

Boston-Springfield 8,820 

Reading-Stoneham 660 

Total 12,600 



92 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Snow plows were distributed as follows: — 

Youlden, Smith & Hopkins of Boston 5 

Lowell Bleachery of Lowell 1 

Massachusetts Department of Public Works, Division of Highways 3 

Strathmore Paper Company of West Springfield 1 

Total 10 

Arrangements were also made to furnish plows, as follows: — 

Springfield Republican 2 

Allen Manufacturing Company of Barre 2 

Ketchen Milk Company of Belchertown 1 

Spencer Bus Line 2 

Worcester City Truck Company . .2 

City of Peabody 1 

Total 10 

These ten plows have been approved for use on the following 
main line of highways: — 

Barre- Worcester. 

Belcherto wn-Holy oke . 

Boston-Ayer. 

Boston-La wrence-Lowell-Haverhill. 

Peabody-Lynn. 

Westfield-Springfield- Worcester. 

The total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, was $18,923. 



HIGHWAYS. 93 



THE REGULATION OF ADVERTISING SIGNS AND DEVICES 
WITHIN THE PUBLIC VIEW. 

Chapter 545 of the Acts of 1920, approved May 27, 1920, 
provides: — 

Section 1. The division of highways of the department of public 
works, hereinafter called the division, shall, within sixty days after the 
passage of this act, make rules and regulations for the proper control and 
restriction of billboard and other advertising devices on public ways or on 
private property within public view of any highway, public park or reser- 
vation, and the division may, from time to time, amend, repeal or add to 
the said rules and regulations. The rules and regulations so made may 
require that billboards or other devices as aforesaid shall be licensed in 
accordance with the provisions thereof and of this act. The said rules 
and regulations need not be uniform throughout the commonwealth, and 
may prescribe license fees, to be fixed with regard to the cost of adminis- 
tering the provisions of this act. 

Section 2. The division shall, before establishing or amending rules 
or regulations hereunder, hold duly advertised public hearings in the city 
of Boston and elsewhere in the commonwealth as it deems necessary or 
expedient. 

Section 3. Cities and towns may, by ordinance or by-law, subject to 
the approval of the division and not inconsistent with the provisions of 
this act or of the rules and regulations made by the division, further regu- 
late and restrict the said billboards or other devices within their respective 
limits. 

Section 4. No person, firm, association or corporation shall post, 
erect, display or continue to maintain any billboard or other advertising 
device, whether already erected at the time when this act takes effect or 
not, on any public way or on private property within public view from 
any highway, public park or reservation, which advertises or calls atten- 
tion to any business, article, substance or any other thing, unless such 
billboard or device conforms to the rules, regulations, ordinance or by-laws 
established under authority of this act: provided, however, that nothing 
herein contained shall apply to signs or other devices erected and main- 
tained in conformity with existing law, advertising or indicating the person 
occupying the premises in question or the business transacted thereon, or 
advertising the property itself or any part thereof as for sale or to let. 

Section 5. This act shall not apply to signs and other devices on or 
in the rolling stock, station, subways or structures of or used by common 
carriers. 

Section 6. The supreme judicial court and the superior court shall 
have jurisdiction in equity on petition of the attorney-general or of any 



94 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

city or town, or of any officer thereof or of any interested party, to restrain 
the erection or maintenance of any billboard, sign or device erected or 
maintained in violation of the provisions of any rule, regulation, ordi- 
nance or by-law adopted under the provisions of this act, and to order its 
removal or abatement as a nuisance. 

Section 7. Any violation of any rule, regulation, ordinance or by-law 
adopted hereunder shall be punished by a fine of not more than one hun- 
dred dollars. Whoever unlawfully maintains a billboard, sign or adver- 
tising device as herein described for a period of twenty days after con- 
viction thereof, shall be deemed to be guilty of a second offense and shall 
be further punished by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars. 

After public notice the Division held three hearings, at which 
individuals, representatives of various municipalities and cor- 
porations, and others, appeared and were fully heard. The fol- 
lowing rules and regulations were adopted, to be in force on 
and after Dec. 31, 1920: — 

Section 1. Definitions. 

Terms used in the following rules and regulations shall be construed as 
follows : — 

" Division" shall mean Division of Highways, Department of Public 
Works. 

" License" shall mean the right to carry on the business of outdoor 
advertising by means of signs and billboards. 

" Permit" shall mean the right to locate and maintain a particular sign. 

"Person" shall mean any individual, partnership or corporation who 
erects or causes to be erected outdoor advertising signs, or is engaged in 
carrying on the business of outdoor advertising. 

"Sign" shall mean any form of outdoor advertising for which a permit 
may be petitioned, or for which a permit may be granted under the pro- 
visions of these regulations. 

"Outdoor advertising" shall mean advertising, the control of which, 
under the provisions of chapter 545, Acts of 1920, is vested in the Division 
of Highways, Department of Public Works. 

Section 2. Licenses. 

A. No person shall engage in the business of advertising in this Com- 
monwealth by means of outdoor advertising signs without first having 
obtained a license from the Division of Highways, Department of Public 
Works. • 

B. Applications for licenses may be made to the Division upon blanks 
prepared under its authority. 

C. Applications shall contain such information as the Division may 
require, and must be accompanied by the proper fee. 



HIGHWAYS. 95 

D. The fee shall be $50, and the license shall be in force for one year 
unless earlier suspended or revoked. 

E. Applications for renewal of licenses may be made not later than 
thirty days prior to the date of expiration, and must be accompanied by 
the annual fee of $50. 

F. The Division reserves the right to suspend or revoke for cause any 
license issued by it under the provisions of this section. 

Section 3. Permits. 

A. No sign shall be located or maintained except as hereinafter pro- 
vided. 

B. No sign shall be located until an application for a permit has been 
filed with the Division and the permit granted. 

C. Applications shall be on forms prepared under the direction of, and 
furnished by, the Division, and shall contain such information as the 
Division may require. 

D. Each sign shall carry the serial number of the permit authorizing 
its location in figures of a size approved by the Division. 

E. Each application for the annual permit shall be accompanied by a 
fee of $1, to be known as the examination fee; and upon issuance of a 
permit an additional fee of $1, to be designated as an inspection fee, shall 
be paid by the licensee. 

F. Permits shall be valid and in force, unless they are revoked by the 
Division, upon payment of the annual fees, which shall be due on the first 
day of July of each year. Failure to pay such fees within thirty days of 
the first day of July will be deemed sufficient reason for forthwith can- 
celling such permits. 

G. The Division reserves the right to annul and revoke for cause any 
permit issued by it under the provisions of this section. 

Section 4. Locations. 

A. No outdoor advertising shall be permitted within the bounds of 
any highway, nor on any location within 300 feet of any park, parkway, 
playground, State reservation or public building. 

B. No outdoor advertising shall be permitted upon any rock or tree, 
nor upon any fence or pole bordering on any public highway. 

C. The location of all signs shall be clearly stated in permits as issued. 

Section 5. Character and Maintenance. 

A. Signs shall be of such size, shape and material as the Division shall 
approve, and shall be so erected and maintained as to conform to the pro- 
visions of the laws of the Commonwealth relating to fire hazard. 

B. It shall be the duty of the licensee maintaining a sign under a permit 
from the Division to keep it and the ground about the same free from all 
rubbish, or any material which the Division may consider disadvantageous 
to the community. 



96 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

C. The Division reserves the right to pass on all matter displayed on 
an}' sign maintained under a permit from the Division, and may require 
the licensee to remove any objectionable matter. 

D. If the licensee fails to meet the requirements of this section, such 
failure shall be deemed sufficient cause for the revocation of the permit 
under which said sign was erected and maintained. 

Section 6. Restrictions. 

Xo permits shall be granted for the location or maintenance of signs 
near certain highwaj's in territory which, in the opinion of the Division, 
is of unusual scenic beauty. Such places will be designated by the Division 
from time to time. 

Section 7. Removals. 

All signs now located within the Commonwealth, and in any way 
affected by these rules and regulations, must be removed on or before 
July 1, 1921, unless permits for the location or maintenance thereof shall 
have previously been granted; provided, however, that signs for the main- 
tenance of which applications shall have been made but not acted upon 
by the Division upon that date may be permitted to remain until such 
time as favorable action thereon is taken by the Division, or, in case of the 
Division's refusal to issue a permit, for a further period of ninetj^ days 
from the date on winch notice of such refusal has been mailed to the appli- 
cant. 

Section 8. 

These rules and regulations shall take effect Dec. 31, 1920. 



HIGHWAYS. 97 



AIRCRAFT. 

Chapter 306 of the General Acts of 1919, approved July 12, 
1919, repealed chapter 663 of the Acts of 1913 regarding the 
use of aircraft. The act of 1919 aforesaid provides: — 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person to operate aircraft of 
any kind in this commonwealth unless he is licensed and the aircraft is 
registered, either by the Massachusetts highway commission, the joint 
army and navy board on aeronautic cognizance, or a federal board or 
department established by congress: provided, however, that the pro- 
visions of this section shall not apply to military or naval aviators while 
in the service of the United States, or of this commonwealth, nor to aircraft 
owned by the United States government or by this commonwealth, nor to 
unlicensed civilians when accompanied by a person licensed as aforesaid 
or by a military or naval aviator, but such licensed person or military or 
naval aviator shall be liable for the violation of any provision of this act 
committed by such unlicensed person. 

Section 2. The Massachusetts highway commission may issue without 
examination a license hereunder to any person who was at any time com- 
missioned as an aviator in the United States army or navy or naval reserve 
corps, or to any applicant who has passed an examination satisfactory to 
the commission and proved that he is skilled in the flying of aircraft, 
whether such examination is held by the commission or by some other 
officer or board approved by the commission. 

Section 3. No person shall operate aircraft over buildings, persons or 
animals in such a manner or at such an altitude as to endanger his own 
life, or the lives or safety of those below him, or the safety of himself and 
his passengers, if he be carrying passengers, nor shall any person operate 
aircraft over the thickly settled district of any city or town except for the 
purpose of embarking from or alighting on designated landing places. 

Section 4. No person shall operate aircraft in such a manner as to 
endanger the lives or safety of the public by the performance of unusual 
or dangerous maneuvers over any massed assembly of one hundred or 
more persons in the open, whether such persons be grouped in a grandstand 
or massed in an open field; nor shall any person throw or drop any missile 
or other article from any aircraft in flight, except over grounds temporarily 

I or permanently devoted to flying, or over open water. 
Section 5. Except in a case of emergency no person shall land aircraft 
in highways cr public parks or other public grounds without permission 
from the authorities in charge thereof. 
Section 6. Landing places for aircraft may, from time to time, be 
designated, set apart and marked, by the commission, or other public 
officials who are in charge of any land owned or controlled by the common- 



98 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

wealth, or by any city or town, or by the metropolitan park commission, 
and said officials are hereby authorized to make reasonable rules and regu- 
lations governing the use of such landing places by aviators and other 
persons, and may change the same from time to time. All aviators and 
other persons using such landing places shall at all times comply with the 
rules and regulations made as aforesaid. 

Section 7. The Massachusetts highway commission may prepare 
rules and regulations, from time to time, governing the use and operation 
of aircraft and relative to the licensing of operators thereof. Such rules 
and regulations shall take effect when approved by the governor and 
council and published in at least one newspaper printed and published in 
each county of the commonwealth, and such publication shall be sufficient 
notice to all persons. 

Section 8. The fee for a license to operate aircraft shall be five 
dollars. The fee for the registration of aircraft shall be two dollars. 

Section 9. Whoever violates any provision of this act or any rule or 
regulation made hereunder shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten 
nor more than five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not less than 
one month nor more than six months, or by both such fine and imprison- 
ment. 

Section 10. Chapter six hundred and sixty-three of the acts of nine- 
teen hundred and thirteen is hereby repealed. 

Up to Dec. 1, 1919, the Massachusetts Highway Commission, 
acting under authority of chapter 663 of the Acts of 1913, 
registered five machines and issued licenses to six persons. 

On May 18, 1920, the following rules and regulations to 
govern the registration of aircraft and the licensing of aircraft 
operators were made by the Division, and the same were ap- 
proved by the Governor and Council May 26, 1920: — 

1. Every applicant for a license to operate aircraft shall file an applica- 
tion in accordance with the form submitted by the Department of Public 
Works, Division of Highways, accompanied by the fee required by law. 

2. Every applicant for aircraft registration shall file an application in 
accordance with the form submitted by the Department of Public Works, 
Division of Highways, accompanied by the fee required by law. 

3. Applications for the registration of an aircraft or for a pilot's license 
shall be referred to such agents as may be designated by the Division of 
Highways, for examination and approval, and if it shall be deemed neces- 
sary, applicants for pilots' licenses may be required to take an examination 
by such agent or agents as the Division of Highways may designate. 

4. Aircraft registered under the provisions of the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts shall carry an identification number of such size 



HIGHWAYS. 99 

and displayed in such a manner as may be definitely ordered by the 
Division of Highways when issuing license for registration. 

5. Upon complaint in writing that any operator under a license issued 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has in any way operated an 
aircraft to endanger public life and property, the operator shall be sum- 
moned before the Division of Highways for a hearing. Pending such 
hearing the license of said operator shall be suspended, and following such 
hearing may be definitely revoked. 

The following forms of application for airplane registration 
and pilot's application, also forms of certificate of airplane 
registration and of operator's license, have been adopted : — 

Application for Airplane Registration. 
Application is hereby made for registration of airplane as described below. 

1 . Type of machine 

2. Full name of maker 

3. Maker's number .... 4. Motor number 

5. Horse power 6. Number of cylinders 

7. Bore or internal diameter of cylinders 

8. Owner of machine 

(Individual, co-partnership, association or corporation.) 

9. Is machine insured? 10. Name and address of insurance 

company 

11. Machine is to be used for following purposes (state whether for pleasure, busi- 
ness, passenger carrying, or other commercial use) : 



12. If for passenger carrying, designate routes, schedules and rates to be charged 



Signed by 

Address Street City State. 

ss. 192 

Then personally appeared , who made oath 

that the foregoing statements were true to the best of his knowledge and belief. 



Investigated and approved , 
192 



License to issue 

Commissioner of Public Works. 



100 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Pilot's Application. 

Name Date of birth 

Sex Height. . . . Ft In. Color of hair Color of eyes 

Address 

Qualified by what authority 

Date of qualification 

Name of field or school where qualified 

Conditions complied with 

Make of machine used 

Hours flown to date of qualification Hours flown since 

Date of last solo flight 19. . . . Minutes flown 

Approximate hours and types of machines flown since date of qualification: 

Type of Aircraft Hours Type of Aircraft Hours 



Has applicant ever completed a regular course of aerial acrobatics? 

If so, where and when? ... 

Do you intend to operate aircraft as a private owner, pilot, corporation pilot, or for 
revenue passenger carrying? 



Give records of accidents and / or breakages to planes , 



Has applicant any physical or other disability, such as defective vision, weak 

heart, etc. ? 

If so, give particulars 

Are you familiar with the rules of the air, the rules in general use for getting away 
and landing at public aerodromes, and the rules in force at United States Army 

aerodromes? 

Give names and addresses of two licensed pilots for references: 



I hereby certify that I am fitted by training and experience to safely operate air- 
craft in Massachusetts. 

Name Address: 

Street City State. 

ss. 192 

Then personally appeared , who made oath 

that the foregoing statements were true to the best of his knowledge and belief. 



Investigated and approved. 
192 



License to issue 

Commissioner of Public Works. 



HIGHWAYS. 101 

Certificate of Airplane Registration No 

An airplane owned by 

residing at No Street 

Mass., is 

hereby registered under the number above written, in accordance with the laws of 
this State. 

Description of Vehicle. 



Engine number, 

Horse Number of 

power ; cyclinders ; Bore ; Fee paid $ 

Date 192 . 

John N. Cole, 
Frank D. Kemp, 
James W. Synan, 
Department of Public Works, 
Approved. Division of Highways. 



Commissioner of Public Works. 
This registration will expire 192 

Airplane Operator's License No 

, residing at 

No St Mass., is 

hereby licensed to operate an airplane in accordance with the law of this State, and 
under the rules and regulations established by the Department of Public Works. 

Description of Person licensed. 

Date of birth Sex 

Height. . . . Ft In. Color of hair Color of eyes 

Date issued 192 

John N. Cole, 
Frank D. Kemp, 
James W. Synan, 
Department of Public Works, 
Approved. . Division of Highways. 



Commissioner of Public Works. 
This license will expire in one year from date. 



During the year the Division has made registration of air- 
craft and issued certificates and airplane operators' licenses, as 
follows : — 



102 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Registration of Aircraft. 



Cer- 
tificate 
No. 


Name. 


Fee 
received. 


Date. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


International Aircraft Corporation, 80 Boylston Street, 

Boston. 
International Aircraft Corporation, 80 Boylston Street, 

Boston. 
American Aerial Corporation, 462 Boylston Street, Boston 

Albert H. Ternstall, Main Street, Brookfield . 

Robert D. Fairbanks, 25 Carver Road, Newton High- 
lands. 

Colonial Aerial Transportation Company, Inc., 743 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, Arlington. 

George H. Watkins, 7 Story Street, Cambridge 

Brooks, Banks & Smith Corporation, 21 Smith Block, 
Framingham. 


$2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 


June 25, 1920 
June 25, 1920 
June 30, 1920 
July 14, 1920 
July 23, 1920 
Aug. 17, 1920 
Sept. 27, 1920 
Nov. 15, 1920 



Airplane Operators' Licenses. 



License 
No. 


Name. 


Fee 

received. 


Date. 


1 


Albert H. Ternstall, Main Street, Brookfield . 


$5 00 


July 14, 1920 


2 


Frederick M. Stieber, 462 Boylston Street, Boston . 


5 00 


July 16, 1920 


3 


Jack A. Mitchell, 743 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington . 


5 00 


Aug. 3, 1920 


4 


Linwood W. Tracy, 91 Gainsboro Street, Boston 


5 00 


Aug. 9, 1920 


5 


Hallock Rouse, 117 Commercial Street, West Lynn 


5 00 


Oct. 8, 1920 


6 


Melvin W. Hodgdon, 8 Indiana Avenue, Somerville 


5 00 


Sept. 9, 1920 


7 


George H. Watkins, 7 Story Street, Cambridge 


5 00 


Sept. 27, 1920 


8 


Irl J. Elliott, Point of Pines, Revere. Care of E. J. Morgan 


5 00 


Oct. 8, 1920 


9 
13 


John McDonough, 42 Delano Street, Revere. Care of A. 

B. Clark. 
Thomas Hayes Potter, 42 Delano Avenue, Revere 


5 00 
5 00 


Oct. 25, 1920 
Oct. 18, 1920 



HIGHWAYS. 103 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

Division of Highways. 

Land and Buildings for Storage and Other Purposes. 

1. The Commonwealth now has invested a large sum of 
money in tools and equipment used in connection with the 
construction and maintenance of highways. In addition to the 
property owned, the Division of Highways is responsible for 
the proper care of a large number of motor cars and trucks 
allotted to the Commonwealth by the Federal government. It 
is desirable that facilities should be provided for taking care of 
this machinery, and in a number of cases it has been found 
very difficult to secure proper accommodations that may be 
rented. It is believed that the State may very wisely purchase 
suitable sites or buildings, or both, for better providing these 
needed facilities, and it is recommended that legislation be 
passed in accordance with the draft of an act submitted. 

Closing Highways under Construction. 

2. The rapid increase in travel over the highways of the 
Commonwealth is making it increasingly difficult to control 
such operations as are necessary when construction and main- 
tenance work is under way. In order that it may be possible 
to relieve this condition, it is recommended that legislation be 
passed in accordance with the bill submitted, to authorize the 
Division of Highways to close to travel public ways that may 
be under construction or improvement by it or by any agent 
it may authorize to do the work. 

Authority to open up Dangerous Corners. 

3. To more clearly define the powers of the Division of High- 
ways in opening up dangerous corners and removing obstruc- 
tions that tend to make travel on the highways more dangerous, 
it is believed that the law now in force relative to this matter 
should be amended substantially as set forth in the draft of an 
act presented, entitled "An Act relative to entry upon private 
land and the removal of trees by the Division of Highways of 
the Department of Public Works." 



104 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Insurance for Operators of State-owned Motor Vehicles. 

4. The increasing hazards attending the operation of motor 
vehicles on the highways eall for consideration for insurance 
that shall properly protect motor vehicle operators and others 
who may be involved in motor vehicle operation. It seems 
reasonable and proper that where employees of the Department 
are operating motor vehicles under orders from Department 
heads, and in carrying on the work required of them, the 
expense of such protection as insurance provides should be 
assumed by the Commonwealth. It is recommended that 
legislation to this end be enacted, and the draft of an act to 
provide for such payment is submitted. 

Extension of Workmen's Compensation. 

5. Under the existing laws, laborers and mechanics employed 
in the service of the Commonwealth are assured certain com- 
pensation in case of injuries, sickness and death, but no com- 
pensation is provided for engineers and their assistants exposed 
to the same liability to injury, accident and death on account 
of their employment. It is recommended that a law be passed 
so that all of these groups shall stand in the same relation 
toward the Commonwealth, in connection with a fair compen- 
sation, as do the laborers and mechanics under the present law. 
A draft of an act is submitted to provide for this extension. 

A More Definite Control of Highway Maintenance. 

6. Under the present provisions of law much work is carried 
on by the Division of Highways in co-operation with the 
several counties, cities and towns throughout the Common- 
wealth. Experience has demonstrated that after the construc- 
tion work is completed there have been many cases where 
repairs and maintenance have not been properly taken care of 
by the particular agents responsible for them. In order that 
the work of maintenance that is so essential to the long life of 
expensively constructed roads may be more surely cared for, 
recommendation is made for a change in the existing law that 
shall provide for an agreement for maintenance as a part of 
the original contract for construction, and further provide for 



HIGHWAYS. 105 

an earlier opportunity for the State to proceed with any neces- 
sary repairs and work of maintenance than it is possible to do 
under the present law. A draft of an act is submitted to bring 
about this change. 

Fixing Authority for Counties and Toivns to make Payments for 

Highivay Work. 

7. There has arisen some question as to the full authority of 
county commissioners to carry out agreements that may be 
made with the Division of Highways in connection with co- 
operative work on the highways. To definitely authorize 
county commissioners to make payments to either the Division 
or the selectmen of towns, on account of such proportion of 
the work as the county may be responsible for, legislation is 
recommended as submitted in the draft of an act. 

Much in the same way, town authorities frequently find 
themselves unable to provide the funds necessary to finance 
work for which contracts have been entered into. The De- 
partment recommends as a relief to this situation the passage 
of a bill submitted relative to borrowing of money by towns for 
such temporary needs. 

Altering and abandoning State Highway Locations. 

8. To more definitely fix the action necessary by the Di- 
vision of Highways in altering the location of a State highway 
in a city or town, or in the abandonment of a portion of State 
highway already located in a city or town, certain changes in 
the law are necessary. The drafts of two acts embodying the 
necessary changes are submitted for consideration. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 
Massachusetts is fortunate in the laws in force for the con- 
trol and regulation of motor vehicles. Changing conditions, 
however, require some few modifications to more definitely de- 
termine certain issues that have arisen during the past year, 
and to more satisfactorily control in some other cases. Legis- 
lation is recommended in the form of four different bills, the 
passage of which is respectfully requested : — 



106 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

9. To authorize the Commissioner of Public Works to ap- 
point an acting registrar of motor vehicles. 

10. To eliminate certain petty charges in connection with 
number plates that may be furnished for other departments 
registering automobiles in the Motor Vehicle Registry. 

11. To make clear the right of officers, charged with the 
responsibility of enforcing the motor vehicle laws, to more ef- 
fectively control persons operating motor vehicles while under 
the influence of intoxicating liquors. 

12. To provide a fitting punishment for persons who operate 
motor vehicles after licenses to so operate have been suspended 
or revoked. 

Motor Vehicle Fees. 

13. The increased cost of highways is making a burden upon 
the Commonwealth impossible for it to bear unless increased 
revenue is provided for their construction and maintenance. 
The road that cost $20,000 a mile when the fees for motor 
vehicle registration now in force were fixed, now costs in excess 
of $40,000 a mile. Repairs and maintenance work involve a 
corresponding increase. The highways constructed any time 
previous to 1915 are to-day requiring new surfacing and in 
almost every case a widened surface to satisfactorily carry the 
heavy traffic. To meet this expense the burden may properly 
be placed upon the motor vehicle in the interest of which the 
present exacting demands are being made. It is believed that 
the time has come for making the fees for legislation provide 
a sufficient revenue to care for this increased demand, and the 
draft of an act is presented establishing a new schedule of 
rates in harmony with highway needs and the present cost of 
everything entering into construction and maintenance of 
highways. 



HIGHWAYS. 



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122 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



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Construc- 
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penditures 
to Dec 1, 
1920. 


$37,946 87 

10,045 97 

15,475 81 
163,452 74 

69,424 30 

47,401 85 

97,352 46 
38,156 69 


Length 

con- 
structed 
(Miles). 


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Tev/ksbury line to Woburn line 
Glen Allen Road via Maple Street 
Miller's River Bridge, River Street 
Ashburnham line 
New Hampshire line 
Abington line to Woburn line . 
Cummington line 
Dalton line .... 
Reading line .... 
Winchester line to Burlington line 
Wilmington line 
Lexington line .... 
Paxton line .... 
Holden line .... 
West Boylston line ■ . 
Plainville line to Norfolk line 
Franklin line . . . 
Foxborough .... 
Barnstable line to Dennis 
Barnstable line to Bass River Bridg 


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Wilmington 

Winchendon 

Winchendon 

Winchendon 

Winchendon 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Windsor 

Woburn 

Woburn 

Woburn 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Wrentham . 

Wrentham . 

Wrentham . 

Yarmouth, Nortl 

Yarmouth, Soutl 



HIGHWAYS. 



123 



The Number of Petitions received for State Highways and the 
Length petitioned for, the Layouts made and their Length 
and Distribution in the Various Counties of the Common- 
wealth, 1894-1920, inclusive. 











Petitions 


Layouts made 


GO 




.PETITIONS 


RECEIVED. 


situated 


[N — 




IN — 




3 
o 
























«*H >> 
























o a 


counties. 


>> 






00 






GO 






GO 


a 




d 
9 


>> 


d 


d 


>> 




53 


>> 


fi 
£ 


cS 


S 




O 


.■^ 


o 


O 


•"£h 


o 


O 


•S 


O 


O 


s 




O 


O 


H 


H 


O 


H 


H 


O 


H 


H 


£ 


Barnstable . 


5 


_ 


59 


64 


_ 


16 


16 


_ 


17 


17 


136 


Berkshire 








18 


12 


63 


93 


2 


31 


33 


2 


23 


25 


148 


Bristol 








5 


8 


55 


68 


3 


19 


22 


3 


16 


19 


129 


Dukes 








3 


- 


6 


9 


- 


6 


6 


- 


6 


6 


29 


Essex . 








10 


28 


62 


100 


8 


26 


34 


10 


23 


33 


172 


Franklin 








2 


- 


63 


65 


- 


18 


18 


- 


16 


16 


115 


Hampden 








4 


6 


36 


46 


3 


17 


20 


2 


13 


15 


93 


Hampshire 








2 


7 


55 


64 


1 


18 


19 


1 


16 


17 


101 


Middlesex 








18 


30 


115 


163 


11 


46 


57 


10 


40 


50 


221 


Nantucket 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


14 


Norfolk 








4 


7 


76 


87 


1 


26 


27 


1 


24 


25 


118 


Plymouth 








- 


8 


72 


80 


1 


27 


28 


1 


21 


22 


155 


Suffolk 








- 


8 


2 


10 


3 


1 


4 


3 


- 


3 


10 


Worcester 








2 


9 


174 


185 


3 


59 


62 


3 


55 


58 


312 


Totals 








73 


123 


839 


1,035 


36 


311 


347 


36 


271 


307 


1,753 



Number of Petitions received, etc. — Concluded. 







Lengths laid out. 




Lengths 
















counties. 


petitioned 
for 

(Miles). 


1894-1919. 


1920. 


TOTALS. 




Miles. 


Miles. 


Miles. 


Barnstable 


158.37 


133.098 


2.708 


135.806 


Berkshire 










189.69 


128.511 


5.779 


134.290 


Bristol 










174.41 


93.761 


- 


93.761 


Dukes 










29.43 


23.021 


- 


23.021 


Essex 










241.15 


105.834 


5.845 


111.679 


Franklin . 










140.48 


92.908 


- 


92.908 


Hampden 










141.84 


68.932 


4.060 


72.992 


Hampshire 










113.74 


66.029 


7.135 


73.164 


Middlesex 










373.09 


156.985 


9.112 


166.097 


Nantucket 










6.47 


6.479 


- 


6.479 


Norfolk . 










196.44 


78.037 


0.327 


78.364 


Plymouth 










223.38 


135.311 


- 


135.311 


Suffolk . 










14.23 


7.376 


- 


7.376 


Worcester 










403.37 


215.512 


7.201 


222.713 


Totals 










2,406.09 


1,311.794 


42.167 


1,353.961 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contract Prices on State 





Contractor. 


Excavation. 


Concrete 
Masonry. 


Bituminous 
Surfacing. 


3 . 


Town or City. 


^5" 
a 

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Acton and Littleton 


Geo. E. Greenough . 


SI 90 


$1 90 


$5 00 


$25 00 


- 


- 


$0 29 


- 


- 


Agawam 
Andover 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 
Geo. T. Seabury, Inc. . 


1 90 

2 45 


2 00 
2 25 


8 00 


: 


- 


— 


30 


$0 23 


- 


Attleboro 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 
G. Louis Burnham 


2 00 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


- 


- 


Barre . 


1 19 


1 00 


4 00 


25 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Billerica 


James H. Fannon 


1 75 


1 75 


6 00 


30 00 


$40 00 


- 


- 


- 


$16 00 


Canton . 


Geo. T. Seabury, Inc. . 


1 95 


1 95 


10 00 


35 00 


40 00 


- 


26 


- 


- 


Cohasset 


Wm. A. Jones . 


2 50 


2 00 


3 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


22 


- 


- 


Danvers and Peabody 


Hamlin & Nelson 


1 45 


1 45 


4 00 


25 00 


31 00 


- 


27 


- 


- 


Danvers 


Welch & Moynihan . 


1 90 


2 10 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


31 


- 


- 


Dracut . 


Antonio Pallatto 


1 95 


2 75 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Dudley . 


C. Bianchi & Co. 


1 80 


1 60 


6 50 


30 00 


45 00 


- 


- 


- 


13 75 


Eastham andWellfleet 


Thomas & Murphy . 


2 00 


2 00 


- 


50 00 


- 


$10 93 


25 


- 


- 


Egremont 
Holyoke 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 
D. O'Connell's Sons . 


2 00 
2 50 


2 50 

2 00 


5 00 

6 50 


30 00 
25 00 


40 00 


_ 


— 


27 
22 


_ 


Huntington . 


Cordner & Montague . 


1 35 


2 00 


5 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


20 


- 


Kingston 

Leicester 

Leicester 

Lexington 

Littleton 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

John McDonald Con- 
struction Company. 

McGuire & McGurty, 
Inc. 

Hanscom Construction 
Company. 

Framingham Construc- 
tion and Supply Com- 


2 25 
1 20 
1 45 
1 90 
1 70 


1 50 

2 00 
2 90 
2 25 

2 50 


6 00 
10 00 

8 00 

3 00 


30 00 

15 00 

50 00 
24 00 


20 00 


- 


27 

30 
23 


22 


16 90 
12 75 


Milford . 


pany. 
Cenedella & Co. 


2 00 


3 50 


6 00 


25 00 


30 00 


- 


22 


- 


- 


Oxford . 


Hassam Paving Com- 


1 80 


2 00 


6 00 


25 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


25 


- 


Palmer . 


pany. 
C. Bianchi & Co., Inc. 


2 25 


2 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


17 75 


Princeton 


C. Bianchi & Co., Inc. 


2 00 


2 75 


4 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


- 


28 


- 


Salisbury 


James E. Watkins 


1 90 


2 10 


5 00 


18 00 


- 


11 75 


28 


- 


- 


Saugus, Lynnfield, 
Peabody and 
Danvers. 

Shrewsbury . 


Hassam Paving Com- 
pany. 

Alex. Palladino . 


1 90 
1 70 


1 90 
1 85 


5 00 


25 00 


35 00 




29 
28 




14 25 


Southwick 
Sterling . 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

Federal Construction 
Company. 

Luigi Carchia . 


2 00 
2 25 


2 00 


6 00 
5 00 


40 00 


35 00 


— 


_ 


23 


— 


Ware 


2 00 


2 00 


6 00 


35 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


20 


- 



HIGHWAYS. 



125 



Highway Construction in 1920. 



Broken 
Stone. 


Pipe Culverts (Lineal Foot). 


*3 

o 
o 
Ph 

"el 
o 

a 

bD 

.2 

"o 

a 


o 

.2 

or 


3 

o 
O 






'a 
o 
H 

O. 
3 

E 


clay. 


CORRUGATED IRON. 


o 


'a 

o 
H 

o 


o 

.s 

0) 

E-i 


A 
O 

c 

'Z 


o 

.2 

a 

o 


o 
.2 

£> 
^> 

H 


,d 

.2 

h 

1 

o 


V 

.2 

'T 

a 
a> 
a> 

X 


a 

.2 
a 
a) 

M 
M 

W 


m 

.2 

03 
O 

o 


S3 80 


$5 60 


- 


$2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$0 80 


- 


- 


$100 00 


- 


4 15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$4 00 


- 


S4 75 


- 


- 


- 


4 90 
4 90 


$3 00 


3 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$7 00 


100 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$3 00 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


4 00 


100 00 


- 


4 70 


- 


- 


- 


S3 00 


- 


S3 50 


- 


1 00 


3 50 


- 


100 00 


- 


4 88 


- 


- 


- 


2 05 


- 


2 65 


- 


- 


1 25 


- 


60 00 


3 35 


- 


1 35 


1 50 


SI 70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70 


- 


4 00 


- 


3 25 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


85 00 


3 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 00 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


6 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 50 


- 


- 


- 


2 50 


- 


- 


3 75 


95 


3 50 


5 00 


- 


- 


4 50 


- 


- 


- 


3 50 


- 


- 


4 50 


80 


3 50 


- 


- 


- 


4 60 


- 


2 00 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


75 


3 50 


4 00 


- 


- 


5 75 


- 


- 


- 


2 50 


- 


- 


- 


95 


- 


5 00 


100 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 75 


- 


- 


2 45 


1 30 


- 


20 00 


100 00 


3 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 15 


- 


100 00 


- 


4 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 50 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 90 


- 


3 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 45 


- 


- 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


2 60 


5 00 


- 


- 


4 50 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 00 


3 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 75 


- 


- 


4 00 


1 00 


2 75 


- 


- 


3 90 


- 


1 90 


- 


- 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


100 00 


4 00 


- 


2 00 


2 25 


2 65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


85 


- 


4 50 


100 00 


- 


3 90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 00 


- 


- 


4 50 


1 00 


3 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 50 


- 


2 00 


- 


2 25 


- 


2 50 


3 00 


- 


2 25 


3 00 


50 00 



126 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



CONTEACT PkICES ON STATE 







Excavation. 


Concrete 
Masonry. 


Bituminous 
Surfacing. 


3 




•3 

fa 




-a 


old 

*-" 3 


S* 


a 
o 
O . 


'a 




2}2 


Town or Citt. 


Contractor. 


&$H 


^t* 


C3>H 


.«? S 


"3 




-~~. 


3 w 






23 

3 

o 

M 
<-. 


3 
O 

o 
hi 
hi 

o 


2 

s 
o 

o 
bo 


lain C 
Masonry 
Yard). 


einforced 
crete ft 
(Cubic Y 


CO o 

oC 

.So 

a <u 
a b 




s 

u 


°j3 






m 


« 


h-5 


Ai 


K 


s 


«< 


H 


o 


Warwick 


F. B. Saunders . 


$1 75 $1 25 


$1000 


$18 00 


$26 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Wayland 


J. H. McCusker 


1 50 


2 00 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


$0 30 


- 


- 


Westfield 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 


1 60 


1 60 


5 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


- 


$0 23 


- 


Westfield 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

Middlesex Construction 
Company. 

A. J. Mitchell . 


1 75 


1 75 


3 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


- 


West Springfield 


1 50 


- 


- 


40 00 


- 


- 


- 


25 


$16 00 


Westwood 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


30 00 


- 


- 


22* 


- 


- 



HIGHWAYS. 



127 



Highway Construction in 1920 — Concluded. 




128 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Care of Shade Trees on State Highways. 

List of Towns and Cities in which Work has been done by the State Forester's 
Department in cleaning and spraying Trees on State Highways for sup- 
pressing Gypsy and Brown-tail Moths and Elm-leaf Beetles, and the 
Amount expended in Each Municipality during the Year. 



Town. 


Amount. 


Town. 


Amount. 


Abington 


$105 80 


Dracut 


$126 74 


Acton 








53 29 


Duxbury . 






70 44 


Amesbury . 








58 56 


East Bridgewater 






50 00 


Andover . 








102 08 


Essex 






28 60 


Ashburnham 








129 00 


Falmouth . 






227 71 


Ashby 








19 29 


Fitchburg . 






85 78 


Ashland 








77 92 


Foxborough 






130 50 


Attleboro . 








67 00 


Framingham 






82 29 


Avon . 








13 50 


Franklin . 






67 00 


Ayer . 








19 15 


Freetown . 






121 00 


Barnstable 








274 95 


Gloucester 






73 10 


Bedford 








49 20 


Grafton 






65 60 


Bellingham 








27 00 


Groton 






6 00 


Berkley 








67 00 


Groveland 






74 05 


Beverly 








124 30 


Hamilton . 






148 08 


Billerica 








89 94 


Hanover . 






75 00 


Blackstone 








22 74 


Harvard 






46 88 


Bourne 








118 12 


Harwich 






100 60 


Boxborough 








37 29 


Haverhill . 






176 37 


Braintree . 








125 00 


Hingham . 






66 59 


Brewster . 








92 32 


Holbrook . 






59 20 


Bridgewater 








66 05 


Holliston . 






99 52 


Brockton . 








11 00 


Hudson 






18 04 


Burlington 








119 98 


Ipswich 






64 55 


Canton 








61 80 


Lakeville . 






209 58 


Chatham . 








59 00 


Lancaster . 






24 80 


Chelmsford 








131 07 


Leominster 






55 32 


Cohasset . 








24 29 


Lexington . 






120 00 


Concord 








30 29 


Lincoln 






30 29 


Danvers . 








15 47 


Littleton . 






19 15 


Dedham . 








50 00 


Lowell 






90 10 


Dennis 








101 80 


Lunenburg 






83 50 


Dighton . 








175 00 


Mansfield . 






101 98 


Dover 








197 88 


Marlborough 






41 44 



HIGHWAYS. 



129 



hist of Towns and Cities in which Work, etc. — Concluded. 



Town. 


Amount. 


Town. 


Amount. 


Marshfield . . . . 


$162 81 


Sheffield 


$50 00 


Mashpee . 








137 50 


Shirley 






54 25 


Melrose 








62 40 


Shrewsbury 






39 40 


Merrimac . 








38 50 


Somerset . 






216 00 


Methuen . 








127 16 


Somerville 






11 00 


Middleborough 








107 16 


Southborough . 






96 47 


Middleton . 








16 91 


Sterling 






121 56 


Millville . 








22 74 


Stoneham . 






101 32 


Milton 








11 00 


Stoughton . 






146 00 


Natick 








53 32 


Sudbury . 






38 04 


Needham . 








95 54 


Swansea . 






229 00 


Newbury . 








71 01 


Taunton . 






134 00 


Newburyport 








39 18 


Templeton 






18 75 


Norfolk 








25 80 


Tewksbury 






130 75 


North Andover 






188 10 


Townsend . 






19 29 


North Attleborough 






108 00 


Truro 






105 00 


North Reading . 






72 00 


Tyngsborough . 






170 75 


Northborough 








242 26 


Uxbridge . 






45 47 


Norton 










207 60 


Walpole 






214 00 


Norwood 










95 45 


Wareham . 






113 23 


Orleans 










97 65 


Way land . 






59 29 


Pembroke 










109 00 


Wellfleet . 






28 20 


Pepperell . 










61 79 


Wenham . 






129 41 


Plain ville 










77 50 


West Boylston . 






66 92 


Plymouth 










180 46 


West Bridgewater 






50 50 


Princeton 










6 50 


West Newbury . 






143 26 


Randolph 










108 00 


Westborough 






55 79 


Raynham 










54 00 


Westford . 






175 40 


Reading 










135 12 


Westminster 






72 61 


Rehoboth 










162 00 


Weston 






39 28 


Rochester 










7 33 


Westwood . 






33 97 


Rockland 










71 45 


Weymouth 






221 63 


Rockport 










12 70 


Wilmington 






80 52 


Rowley 










108 13 


Winchendon 






36 75 


Salisbury 










166 59 


Winchester 






73 50 


Sandwich 










85 58 


Woburn 






251 03 


Scituate 










111 87 


Wrentham 






216 00 


Seekonk 










54 00 


Yarmouth 






149 67 


Sharon 


11 00 


Total . 






$13,000 00 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Statement of Claims against the Department of Publjc Works, 

Division of Highways. 

[As required by section 5, chapter 18 of the Revised Laws.] 



Name. 



Residence. 



Nature of Claim. 



Beman, Richard D. 

Boudreau, William . 

Bray, Lizzie A. 

Carroll, Mary, and Mary 

A. Finn. 
Clifford, John A. . 

Coleman, John H. . 

Farnum, Elizabeth M. . 

Flagg, Lucretia T. . 

Fuller, Reuben H. . 

Garr, Craig 

Goward, Louis B., and 

Florence E. 
Haskell, Edith L. 

Ireson, Jennie E. 

Jacques, Rose . 

Kneisel, Joseph 

Lemon, Elizabeth 

Lemon, Solomon 

McGee, John P. 

Moran, James . 

Moran, Mary E. 

Paine, Sarah E. 

Parker, Frank C. 

Proctor, George W. 

Ray, Foster S. 

Remington, Mary A. 

Roberts, William H. 

Sampson, Frances A. 

Scott, Hugh C. 

Snow, Frank E. 

Taft, Kate P. . 

Tribou, E. Harry . 

Wade, Julia A. 

White, Emma A., et al. . 

York, Addie A. 



Becket . 

Wilmington 

Gloucester 

Northbridge 

Salisbury 

Gloucester 

Uxbridge 

Northampton 

Mashpee 

Northbridge 

Taunton 

Gloucester 

Wrentham 

Grafton 

Dedham 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Marlborough 

West Boylston 

West Boylston 

Revere . 

Becket . 

Gloucester 

Charlton 

Great Barrington 

Gloucester 

Plymouth 

Norton . 

Wrentham 

Northampton 

Gloucester 

Lee 

Gloucester 

Wrentham 



Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on State highway in Becket. 

Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on State highway in Wilmington. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Northbridge. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Salisbury. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Uxbridge. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Northampton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Mashpee. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Northbridge. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Taunton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Wrentham. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Grafton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Dedham. 

Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on State highway in Spencer. 

Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on State highway in Spencer. _ 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Marlborough. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in West Boylston. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in West Boylston. 

Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on the State highway in Revere. 

Damage due to accident alleged to have oc- 
curred on the State highway in Becket. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Charlton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Great Barrington. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Plymouth. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Norton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Wrentham. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Northampton. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Lee. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Gloucester. 

Damages due to construction of State highway 
in Wrentham. 



E R M O N T 



NEW 



AMP 



H 



R E 







SETTS 



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MAP OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

SHOWING 

STATE HIGHWAYS 

LAID OUT 

Roads' Laid out shown thus ^ • 

Improved connecting roads shown thus » * 



fwESTPORToARTMOUTri 



*i? 



!> 



► 






CORRECTED TO DEC. 1. 1920 




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MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 131 



REGISTRY OF MOTOR VEHICLES. 



Motor Vehicle Deaths, Injuries, Collisions. 

One of the great questions pressing the American people for 
solution is how to reduce accidents resulting from motor vehicle 
collisions. 

During the past year in Massachusetts the Registry entered 
upon a safety campaign, and through its offices the Safe Roads 
Federation was organized, made up of representatives from 
various civic bodies throughout the Commonwealth, as well as 
insurance companies, automobile dealers and allied interests. 

As the result of great activity on the part of these organi- 
zations, aided by the police and the Registry, the number of 
persons killed in the Commonwealth during the year 1920 was 
102 less than were killed the year before, notwithstanding the 
fact that there were some 54,000 more automobiles on the high- 
ways in 1920 than there were in 1919. 

The number of persons injured increased, indicating that while 
serious accidents were reduced minor accidents increased, and 
after analyzing these accidents it was determined by the Regis- 
try to be necessary to make every person pass an examination 
before receiving a license to operate motor vehicles. This drastic 
change in the law will be put into effect Dec. 1, 1920, and it is 
expected that the result will be a great reduction in minor 
accidents for the year 1921. 

The following tables are a comparison of the accidents in 
which motor vehicles were involved during the years 1919 and 
1920: — 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Number of Persons killed and injured. 



Killed. 



1919. 



Pedestrians 
Occupants of autos . 
Occupants of carriages 
Motorcycle riders 
Bicycle riders . 
Pedestrians near street cars 
Totals 



379 

160 

1 

25 

17 



582 



1920. 



315 

114 

1 

28 
12 
10 



480 



Injured. 



1919. 



5,719 

8,712 

541 

677 

622 

10 



16,281 



1920. 



7,731 
11,055 
344 
870 
868 
218 



21,086 



Number of Collisions. 



1919. 



1920. 



Autos v. pedestrians 
Autos v. autos 
Autos v. motorcycles 
Autos v. bicycles . 
Autos v. carriages . 
Autos v. pole, curb, etc. 
Autos v. trolleys 
Autos v. trains 

Totals 
In the daytime 
After dark 

Totals 



6,119 


7,118 


11,433 


12,297 


10 


396 


712 


850 


829 


639 


1,169 


1,338 


918 


790 


44 


39 


21,304 


23,467 


17,366 


19,105 


3,938 


4,362 



21,304 



23,467 



Killed, 
Injured, 



Children killed and injured in 1920. 



190 
2,101 



Licenses suspended and revoked. 

The statements following show the action taken by the Regis- 
trar and the causes therefor: — 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 



133 



Number of Licenses suspended and revoked, Fiscal Years 1919 and 

1920. 







1919. 








1920. 


Date. 


Liquor. 


Other 
Causes. 


Total. 


Date. 


Liquor. 


Other 
Causes. 


Total. 


1918. 








1919. 








December 


52 


132 


184 


December 


42 


80 


122 


1919. 








1920. 








January 


39 


92 


131 


January 






28 


84 


112 


February . 




34 


90 


124 


February 






12 


32 


44 


March 




26 


61 


87 


March 






9 


31 


40 


April 




48 


123 


171 


April 






31 


58 


89 


May . 
June 




45 
53 


274 


372 


May . 
June 






46 
69 


| 312 


427 


July . 




69 


188 


257 


July. 






100 


237 


337 


August 




38 


134 


172 


August 






119 


231 


350 


September 




60 


184 


244 


September 




134 


290 


424 


October . 




55 


187 


242 


October . 




132 


317 


449 


November 




35 


137 


172 


November 




166 


384 


550 


Totals 


554 


1,602 


2,156 


Totals 




888 


2,056 


2,944 



Number of Licenses suspended and revoked according to Nature 

of Offences. 



Recklessness 

Liquor 

Refusing to stop 

Taking car without authority .... 

Improper person 

Improper operating ...... 

Two overspeedings ...... 

Three overspeedings 

Deaths 

Operating truck or for hire on operator's license 

Other offences 

Totals 




134 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Investigations and Prosecutions by Inspectors. 
The following table furnishes a classification and summary of 
the work of the inspectors other than examination work, together 
with comparative figures for the preceding year: — - 



1919. 



1920. 



Total reports received from inspectors . 
Itemized as follows: — 

Accidents, fatal 

Accidents, non-fatal 

Accidents, brief reports .... 

General reputation 

Miscellaneous 

Prosecutions (miscellaneous offences) 
Prosecutions (operating with dazzling lights) 

Fines for miscellaneous offences 

Fines for dazzling lights .... 



2,058 



M31 



1,522 



532 


480 


307 


316 


456 


230 


249 


223 


296 


273 


2,058 


1,522 


189 


52 


342 


24 


531 


76 


$4,810 


$1,753 


2,321 


240 



$1,993 



Comparison of Abstracts of Court Records, Fiscal Years 1919 and 

1920. 



1919. 



1920. 



Number of courts that have forwarded abstracts 
Number of abstracts received .... 

Disposition of Cases. 
Persons guilty of operating unlawfully . 
Persons not guilty of operating unlawfully 
Cases appealed to a higher court 
Complaints placed on file .... 

Complaints nol-prossed 

Probation 

Persons committed to imprisonment 
Defendants defaulted 



91 


94 


14,212 


29,056 


12,372 


19,086 


492 


704 


825 


1,093 


3,926 


5,710 


344 


182 


201 


332 


439 


331 


14 


46 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 



135 



Comparison of Abstracts of Court Records, Fiscal Years 1919 and 

1920 — Concluded. 



1919. 



1920. 



Offences. 

For overspeeding 

For reckless operating 

For operating while intoxicated ...... 

For using automobile without authority . . . . 

For endangering lives and safety of the public 

For failing to stop after causing injury 

For operating without a license 

For operating without carrying registration certificate . 
For operating an unregistered motor vehicle .... 
For improper display or no register number ... 
For refusing to stop when signaled by officer . 

For operating with unlighted lamps 

For failing to give signal when approaching intersecting way 

For operating with dazzling lights 

For operating within 8 feet of street car 

For violating metropolitan park rules 

For miscellaneous offences 

For operating after license suspended or revoked . 

For larceny of motor vehicles 

For manslaughter 



4,195 
194 
788 
286 
357 
139 

1,657 
667 
323 
354 
336 

1,682 

1,283 
658 
300 
236 

1,141 

36 

339 

32 



6,593 

192 

992 

164 

419 

156 

2,321 

1,347 

406 

536 

589 

1,549 

3,163 

148 

318 

423 

2,612 

43 

53 

34 





Fines paid, as reported by State Auditor. 




1919. 


1920. 


For violations of the motor vehicle law 


$104,924 94 


$146,453 04 



Examinations. 
During the past year the number of examining points has been 
very largely increased. Heretofore examinations were held in 
only 11 of the larger cities of the Commonwealth. Now they 
are held in 56 cities and towns. At some of these places ex- 
aminations are conducted daily, and at other points weekly or 
fortnightly, according to the season, and as warranted by the 
number of applications. 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



The list of examination points follows 



Athol 

Attleboro 

Ayer 

Boston 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Clinton 

Concord 

Fall River 

Falmouth 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Franklin 

Gardner 

Gloucester 

Great Barrington 

Greenfield 

Haverhill 



Hingham 

Holyoke 

Hyannis 

Ipswich 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Mansfield 

Marlborough 

Middleborough 

Milford 

Nantucket 

New Bedford 

Newburyport 

Newton (West) 

North Adams 

Northampton 

North Brookfield 



Norwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Palmer 

Pittsfield 

Plymouth 

Provincetown 

Quincy 

Rockland 

Salem 

Southbridge 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Ware 

Wareham 

Westfield 

Whitinsville 

Woburn 

Worcester 



The Inspectors of the Examination and Investigation Section 
during the year 1920 conducted 39,845 examinations of chauf- 
feurs and private operators. Of the chauffeurs examined, 32,934 
passed on the first test and 4,510, or 12 per cent failed. Of the 
2,401 operators examined, 403, or 16.7 per cent, were reported 
as unfit. The total number of " minor operators," or persons 
between sixteen and eighteen years of age, examined was 1,938. 
Of these minor operators the percentage of failure in the ex- 
amination was 15.2 per cent. There were 78 operators having 
physical infirmity which were examined; 21, or 26.9 per cent, of 
these were reported unfit. There were also 50 persons examined 
for the reinstatement of their licenses. It is significant that 24, 
or 48 per cent, of these failed to pass. 

The following table shows a comparison of examinations con- 
ducted during the fiscal years 1918, 1919 and 1920: — 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 



137 





1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


Total examinations 












17,388 


19,107 


39,845 


Chauffeurs examined 












17,203 


18,882 


37,444 


Chauffeurs unfit 












3,386 


3,499 


4,510 


Operators examined 












185 


225 


2,401 


Operators unfit 












61 


66 


403 


Physical infirmity . 












- 


- 


78 


Physical infirmity, unfit 












- 


- 


21 


For reinstatement . 












- 


- 


50 


For reinstatement, unfit 












- 


- 


24 



Personnel of the Examining and Investigating Section. 

The personnel of this section has undergone several changes, 
several new inspectors having been appointed to fill the vacancies 
occasioned by resignations, and seven new inspectors having 
been added on account of increased work, so that the total 
working force of the section now consists of one chief inspector, 
twenty-nine inspectors and examiners, five stenographers, and 
eight clerks, — a total of forty-three. 



Used-car Section. 

The object of this work is to record transactions involving the 
transfer of ownership of motor vehicles, showing the continuity 
of ownership of such vehicles, and keeping records in such a way 
that when a motor vehicle is reported stolen we may watch for 
its registration by engine number and prevent further fraud. 

On account of lack of space it was not possible to put sufficient 
employees on the work to complete the files, but the same are 
well advanced so that early in 1921 there will be on file, accord- 
ing to engine number and make of car for each registered motor 
vehicle, a record. When a motor vehicle is reported stolen a 
blue card is written and placed in its numerical order in the file 
so that, together with the four-day notice required before a car 
is sold, it is very possible to detect and prevent a transfer of a 
stolen car, as reports of sale and transfer of motor vehicles by 
either dealers or individuals are checked up daily with the 
records of stolen cars on file. 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Reports received. 
Reports have been received at this office from 1,626 dealers. 
Of this number, 805 were dealers holding agents' licenses who 
made over 700 weekly reports. Of these, 728 dealers held used- 
car dealers' licenses, and these dealers were required to make 
daily reports, such reports averaging 150 a day. The reports 
from individuals averaged 150 a day, such reports being required 
except when an individual sells to a first-class dealer or agent. 

Stolen Cars and Recovery. 

Over 1,400 cars have been reported as being stolen, many of 
these reports coming from States other than Massachusetts. 
One hundred and seventy-five cars were recovered by this office 
or through information furnished by this office in 1920. In ad- 
dition, over 50 cars which had been sold on leases or other con- 
ditions, and lost track of, were located for dealers and others 
requesting assistance in tracing property in which they had an 
interest. 

The work of this section, to be fully successful, must have the 
co-operation of the police departments throughout the State. 
The Boston police department, in particular, has assisted in 
every way, so that it is believed that the so-called "fences" for 
stolen cars are a thing of the past as a result of the law regu- 
lating the purchase and sale of motor vehicles, making it in- 
cumbent on dealers and others to report both here and to the 
police. 

Registrations, Licenses, Fees. 
During the year 1920 the registration of all classes of motor 
vehicles increased over that for 1919, and the increase is clearly 
shown in the following table : — 

Automobiles, Commercial Vehicles and Motor Cycles. 



1915. 



1916. 



1917. 



1918. 



1919. 



1920. 



Per Cent 

Increase, 

Five 

Years. 



Automobiles 
Commercial vehicles . 
Motor cycles 



90,580 

12,053 

9,520 



118,615 
18,194 
10,713 



145,801 
25,505 
10,956 



160,486 
33,011 
12,862 



205,372 
41,810 
13,698 



251,570 
52,968 
15,142 



177 

339 
59 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 



139 



The fees received for the year 1920, together with the number 
of vehicles registered in each classification and the number of 
licenses granted, etc., are shown in the following table: — 

Analysis of Receipts. 

Certificates of registration : 

Automobiles (including 52,968 commercial 

vehicles) 304,658 $3,025,069 50 

Motor cycles 15,142 32,675 00 

Motor cycle dealers 43 410 00 

Manufacturers or dealers 1,961 48,725 00 

Manufacturers or dealers, additional cars . 2,657 17,194 00 

Repairers 43 385 00 



Licenses to operate: 












Operators .... 


. 75,304 at $2 00 


150,608 00 


Chauffeurs . 






. 30,937 at 


2 00 


61,874 00 


Operators' renewals 






. 108,593 at 


2 00 


217,186 00 


Operators' renewals 






. 97,798 at 


1 00 


97,798 00 


Chauffeurs' renewals 






. 41,185 at 


2 00 


82,370 00 


Chauffeurs' renewals 






7,722 at 


1 00 


7,722 00 


Additional renewal fees 






. 13,500 at 


1 00 


13,500 00 


Examinations 






. 42,595 at 


2 00 


85,190 00 


Copies of certificates and licenses 


fur- 






nished .... 


. 14,703 at 


50 


7,351 50 


Duplicate automobile number plate 


s . 6,831 at 


75 


5,123 25 


Duplicate motor cycle number pla 


tes . 409 at 


50 


204 50 


State plates furnished 






985 at 


10 


98 50 



Total $3,853,484 25 

Miscellaneous receipts, including interest on deposits . . 6,747 45 

Total fees $3,860,231 70 

Motor vehicle fees rebated (deducted), 73,236 96 

Net fees, . $3,786,994 74 

Court fines received by the Treasurer and Receiver-General 146,453 04 



Total receipts credited motor vehicle fees account, 1920 $3,933,448 78 

The cost of running the Registry of Motor Vehicles for the 
year 1920 was $426,819.88, which was 11.27 per cent of the net 
fees collected, as compared with 11.48 per cent for the year 1919. 
This cost, deducted from the receipts of the year, left available 



140 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

for legislative appropriation for highway work the sum of 
$3,506,628.15. 

The following table gives an analysis of the expenditures for 
running the Registry for the year 1920: — 

Expenditures for the Fiscal Year 1920. 

Personal services: 

Regular payroll $230,890 05 

Overtime 14,485 78 



Supplies : 

Books, maps, etc $144 00 

Typewriter repairs and supplies . . . 2,404 32 

Adding machine supplies .... 77 75 

Other supplies 224 54 

Stationery 15,347 50 

Guide cards 484 65 

Equipment: 

Typewriter machines $1,902 70 

Adding machines 1,663 00 

Other machines 1,557 54 

Furniture : 

Filing cabinets $321 42 

Electric fans 532 80 

Electric wiring 330 42 

Miscellaneous 543 66 

Traveling expenses: 

Employees . . . . . . . $15,300 65 

Automobiles (owned by employees) . . 14,191 56 

Other traveling expenses . . . . 1,581 16 



Other services as listed below: 

Expressage $356 44 

Postage 30,824 73 

Printing 26,279 42 

Telephone and telegrams .... 83 99 

Rent (31 Mount Vernon Street) ... 816 67 

Special services (labor and police) . . 1,740 85 

Advertising 73 75 

Badges for inspectors 113 50 



$249,375 83 



18,682 76 



5,123 24 



1,728 30 



31,073 37 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRY. 



141 



Other services as listed below — Concluded. 
Commissions as justices of the peace . 

Number plates 

Sundries 

Towels 



Total 



$65 00 

60,396 93 

63 25 

21 85 



$120,836 38 
$426,819 88 



The total amount available for 1920 was $427,395.40. 

The following comparative statement for the years 1919 and 
1920 shows very plainly the increase of work as occasioned by 
increased registrations and licenses, etc. : — 



1919. 



1920. 



Automobile registrations 

Highest number plate assigned 

Commercial registrations ....... 

Highest number plate assigned 

Motor cycle registrations ....... 

Highest number plate assigned 

Motor cycle dealers' registrations 

Manufacturers' or dealers' registrations .... 
Licenses to operate: 

Operators 

Chauffeurs . 

Operator renewals 

Chauffeur renewals ........ 

Total licenses 

Examinations 

Copies of certificates and licenses issued .... 

Duplicate automobile number plates 

Duplicate motor cycle number plates 

Fees ........... 

Miscellaneous receipts, including interest on deposits 

Total fees 

Motor vehicle fees rebated (deducted) .... 

Net fees 

Court fines received by the Treasurer and Receiver-General 

Total receipts credited Motor Vehicle Fees Account . 

Personal services . 

Expenses 



* 203,364 


251,570 


177,950 


219,717 


43,819 


52,968 


B4 1,753 


B49.572 


13,698 


15,142 


- 


14,508 


31 


43 


2,465 


1,961 


63,530 


75,304 


15,358 


30,937 


161,391 


206,391 


57,689 


48,907 


297,968 


361,539 


19,022 


42,595 


11,197 


14,703 


5,451 


6,831 


488 


409 


$2,652,228 90 


$3,853,484 25 


15,624 95 


6,747 45 


$2,667,853 85 


$3,860,231 70 


36,051 50 


73,236 96 


$2,631,802 35 


$3,786,994 74 


104,924 94 


146,453 04 


$2,736,727 29 


$3,933,448 78 


$162,358 39 


$249,375 83 


139,921 70 


177,444 05 



INDEX 



INDEX. 



Department of Public Works. 

page 
Appointments, Assignments and Organization, under ch. 350, Gen. Acts 

of 1919 ■ . 3-6 

Division of Highways. 

Advertising Signs and Devices within the Public View .... 93 

Rules and Regulations ........ 94-96 

Aircraft ............ 97 

Application for Registration ....... 99 

Certificate of Registration ........ 101 

Certificates of Registration issued in 1920 ..... 102 

Operator's License ......... 101 

Operators' Licenses issued in 1920 ...... 102 

Pilot's Application . . . . . . . . . 100 

Rules and Regulations ........ 98 

Appropriations ........... 7-10 

Bridges ............ 65 

Built or contracted for, or contemplated ..... 65 

Merrimack River, between Newburyport and Salisbury ... 66 

Taunton Great River, between Fall River and Somerset ... 66 

Claims 130 

Contract Prices on State Highway Construction in 1920 . . . 124-127 

Contracts signed during the Year . . . . . . . 12 

Co-operative Work, Supervision of Certain Expenditures by Counties, 

Cities and Towns ........ 12 

Expenditures for Construction and Maintenance of State Highways, 

and for Other Work ........ 10 

Summary for the Year . . . . . . . 10, 11 

Engineering Advice to Municipal Authorities ..... 15 

Federal Aid in Constructing Highways, . . . . . . 57 

Allotments to Massachusetts, 1917-21 60 

Mileage in Various Counties ........ 60 

Statement of Road Projects ....... 61 

Total Mileage of Road Projects ....... 60 

Federal Distribution of Road Equipment, etc. . . . . . . 63 

Passenger Cars and Trucks ........ 64 

Schedule of Miscellaneous Equipment ...... 63 

General Statement as to Surveys, Plans, Estimates and Other Work 

during the Year . . . . . . . 13-15 

Engineering Advice to Municipal Authorities .... 15 

Highways, Length of Construction, etc. ..... 14 

Permits issued for opening or occupying State Highways . . 14 

Resurfacing and Widening of State Highways . . . . 15 

State Highway Construction in Miles, completed during the Year . 14 

Trees planted on the Borders of State Highways . . . -14, 128 

Hearings and Meetings 12 



146 



INDEX. 



Highway Improvements in Various Localities, under Special Legislatrv 

Authority passed in 1920 . 
Highway Improvements in Various Localities, under Special Legislativ 

Authority previous to 1920 ..... 

Highwa3^s : 

Keeping Certain Highways open during the Winter Months 
Work done during the Year, in Addition to State Highway Work 
Highways in the Five Western Counties (ch. 221, Gen. Acts of 1915) 

Expenditures in Various Localities ..... 

Highways laid out or contracted for and Construction Expenditures to 

Dec. 1, 1920 

Petitions received during the Year 
Petitions for State Highways, the Length petitioned for, etc., 1894-1920 
inclusive ......... 

Public Ways, exclusive of State Highways, in Certain Towns: 
Repair and Improvement (ch. 155, Gen. Acts of 1918) 
Allotments or Contributions by the State and Towns 
Contracts signed during the Year ..... 

Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns . 

Petitions received during the Year ..... 

Towns where Work has been contracted for 
Recommendations for Legislation ...... 

Altering and abandoning State Highway Locations 
A more Definite Control of Highway Maintenance . 
Authority to open up Dangerous Corners .... 

Closing Highways under Construction ..... 

Extension of Workmen's Compensation .... 

Fixing Authority for Counties and Towns to make Payments fo 
Highway Work ....... 

Insurance for Operators of State-owned Motor Vehicles . 

Land and Buildings for Storage and Other Purposes 

Registry of Motor Vehicles ....... 

Authorize the Commissioner of Public Works to appoint an 
Acting Registrar of Motor Vehicles ..... 

Eliminate Certain Petty Charges in Connection with Number 
. Plates that may be furnished for Other Departments register- 
ing Automobiles in the Motor Vehicle Registry 
Make clear the Right of Officers, charged with the Responsi- 
bility of enforcing the Motor Vehicle Laws, to more effectively 
control Persons operating Motor Vehicles while under the 
Influence of Intoxicating Liquors ..... 

Motor Vehicle Fees . . . . . . . 

Provide a Fitting Punishment for Persons who operate Motor 
Vehicles after Licenses to so operate have been suspended or 
revoked ...... 

State Highways ...... 

Appropriations ...... 

Claims ....... 

Construction (ch. 344, Gen. Acts of 1917, Part I) 
Completed during the Year . 

Expenditures in Various Counties, Cities and Towns 
Construction and Resurfacing (ch. 344, Gen. Acts of 1917, Part I) 
Contracts entered into for Work in Various Municipalities 
Expenditures in Various Municipalities .... 

Contract Prices in 1920 ....... 



PAGE 

48-50 

51-56 

91 
14 

77 
78 

107-122 
12, 16 

123 

83 

84 

12 

87-90 

12 

84-86 

103-106 

105 

104 

103 

103 

104 

105 
104 
103 
106 

106 
106 



106 
106 



106 

16 

7-9 

130 

17 

14 

17-19 

19 

19-24 

20-24 

124 



INDEX. 



147 



State Highways — Concluded. 

Contracts signed during the Year ...... 

Federal Aid in constructing Highways ..... 

Allotments to Massachusetts, 1917-21 .... 

Mileage in Various Counties ...... 

Statement of Road Projects ...... 

Total Mileage of Road Projects ..... 

Highways laid out or contracted for and Construction Expenditures 

to Dec. 1, 1920 

Maintenance, from Motor Vehicle Fees Fund (ch. 344, Gen. Acts of 

1917, Part I) 

Expenditures in Various Counties, Cities and Towns 
Maintenance, from Revenue Appropriations (ch. 344, Gen. Acts of 

1917, Part I) 

Average Expenditure per Mile in 1920, etc. 
Expenditures in Various Counties, Cities and Towns 
Permits issued for opening or occupying State Highways 
Petitions received during the Year ..... 

Petitions for State Highways, the Length petitioned for, etc., 1894- 
1920, inclusive ........ 

Resurfacing and Widening ....... 

Summary of Expenditures during the Year .... 

Trees .......... 

Town and County Ways, Maintenance and Improvement (ch. 525, Acts 

of 1910) 

Allotments or Contributions by the State, Counties and Towns 
Contracts signed during the Year ...... 

Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns 

Petitions received during the Year ..... 

Towns where Work has been contracted for .... 

Type of Road and Length contracted for .... 

Ways in Certain Towns, Construction and Repair (ch. 344, Gen. Acts 

of 1917, Part I, sect. 23) 

Allotments or Contributions by the State, Counties and Towns 
Contracts signed during the Year ...... 

Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns 

Petitions received during the Year , . 

Towns where Work has been contracted for . 

Type of Road and Length contracted for .... 



PAGE 

12 
57 
60 
60 
61 
60 

107-122 

24 
24-31 

32 

39-47 

32 

14 

12, 16 

123 
15 

10, 11 
14, 128 

68 

69 

12 

72-76 

12 

69-72 

69-72 

80 
81 
12 

81,82 
12 
81 
81 



Registry of Motor Vehicles. 
Accidents ........ 

Analysis of Receipts ....... 

Children killed and injured in 1920 . 

Comparison of Abstracts of Court Records, 1919 and 1920 

Examination Points . 

Examinations . 

Total, 1918-20, inclusive . 
Expenditures for the Year 1920 
Fines paid 
Increase of Work 

Comparative Statement, 1919 and 1920 
Investigations and Prosecutions by Inspectors in 1919 and 1920 
Licenses suspended and revoked ..... 
Motor Vehicle Deaths, Injuries, Collisions . 



131 
139 
132 
134 
136 
135 
137 
140 
135 
141 
141 
134 
132 
131 



148 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Number of Collisions in 1919 and 1920 132 

Number of Licenses suspended and revoked in 1919 and 1920 . . 133 
Number of Licenses suspended and revoked according to Nature of 

Offences 133 

Number of Persons killed and injured in 1919 and 1920 . . . 132 

Personnel of Examining and Investigating Section . . . 137 

Registrations, Licenses, Fees ........ 138 

Automobile, Commercial Vehicles and Motor Cycles, 1915-20, in- 
clusive .......... 138 

Reports received .......... 138 

Stolen Cars and Recovery ......... 138 

Used Car Section 137 



®tu» (Slnttmumwealtly nf ilaBaadntarttfi 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1920 



RELATING TO THE 



DIVISION OF WATEEWAYS AND PUBLIC LANDS 





BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 

1922 



Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration 



®f)e tJIomtnontoealtt) of JttaBBacljusette 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts. 

Pursuant to the provisions of law, I have the honor as Com- 
missioner of Public Works to submit the first annual report of 
the Department of Public Works for the fiscal year ending 
Nov. 30, 1920. 

The divisions created by law to cover the activities of the 
Department have been organized in accordance with chapter 
350 of the General Acts of 1919, which provided as follows: — 

Section 111. The Massachusetts highway commission, existing under 
authority of chapter three hundred and forty-four of the General Acts of 
nineteen hundred and seventeen and acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto, and the commission on waterways and public lands 
existing under authority of chapter two hundred and eighty-eight of the 
General Acts of nineteen hundred and sixteen, are hereby abolished. All 
the rights, powers, duties and obligations of said commissions are hereby 
transferred to and shall hereafter be exercised and performed by the de- 
partment of public works established by this act, which shall be the lawful 
successor of said commissions. 

Section 112. The department of public works shall be under the 
supervision and control of a commissioner, to be known as commissioner 
of public works, and four associate commissioners, all of whom shall be 
appointed by the governor, with the advice and consent of the council. 
The commissioner shall be appointed for the term of three years. Of the 
associate commissioners first appointed, two shall be appointed for the 
term of one year and two for the term of two years. Thereafter as the 
terms expire the governor shall appoint the commissioner and the associate 
commissioners for the term of three years, shall fill any vacancy for the 
unexpired term, and may, with the consent of the council, remove the 
commissioner or any of the associate commissioners. The commissioner 
shall receive such annual salary, not exceeding seven thousand five hun- 
dred dollars, and the associate commissioners such annual salaries not 
exceeding six thousand dollars, as the governor and council may determine. 

Section 113. The department shall be organized in two divisions, 
namely, a division of highways and a division of waterways and public 



4 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

lands. The said divisions shall have, exercise and perform, the rights, 
powers, duties and obligations, respectively, of the Massachusetts highway 
commission and the commission on waterways and public lands, except as 
is otherwise provided herein. The governor shall, at the time of making 
the first appointments under the preceding section, designate two of the 
associate commissioners to have charge of the division of highwaj^s and 
two to have charge of the division of waterways and public lands. There- 
after, whenever a change in the associate commissioners occurs, the gov- 
ernor may make a new designation. The commissioner shall be entitled 
to act as a member of both divisions, and when present shall act as chair- 
man of the division. The concurrence of two members shall be necessary 
in any official act of either division. 

Section 114. The commissioner shall be the executive and adminis- 
trative head of the department. He shall approve all contracts made by 
either division, and may require any of the expenditures of either division 
to be submitted to him for approval. He may, subject to the civil service 
law and rules, where they apply, appoint, assign to divisions, transfer and 
remove such officials and employees as the work of the department may 
require, and, subject to the provisions of chapter two hundred and twenty- 
eight of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen, and the rules 
and regulations made thereunder, and to the approval of the governor and 
council where that is required by law, fix the compensation of the said 
persons. 

Section 115. The commissioner shall appoint, and may remove, 
subject to the approval of the governor and council, an official to be 
known as registrar of motor vehicles, and may, with like approval, fix his 
compensation. The registrar of motor vehicles shall have, exercise and 
perform all the rights, powers, duties and obligations of the Massachusetts 
highway commission relative to motor vehicles and to the operation there- 
of, as defined by chapter five hundred and thirty-four of the acts of nine- 
teen hundred and nine, and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto. Any person aggrieved by a regulation, ruling or decision of said 
registrar may, within ten days thereafter, appeal from such regulation, 
ruling or decision to the commissioners of the division of highways who 
may, after a hearing, order such regulation, ruling or decision to be affirmed, 
modified or annulled. 

Section 116. All rules and regulations under provisions of existing 
law within the jurisdiction of the division of highways, the division of 
waterways and public lands or the registrar of motor vehicles shall be 
drafted by the commissioners having charge of said divisions or by said 
registrar, shall be submitted to the commissioner and associate commis- 
sioners sitting as a board, and shall take effect, subject to the provisions 
of chapter three hundred and seven of the General Acts of nineteen hun- 
dred and seventeen, when approved by them, and at such time as they 
shall designate. Said board shall also have power to make all needful 
rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions of this act relating 
to the said department. 



WATERWAYS. 5 

Under the terms of the act the following original appoint- 
ments were made: — 

Commissioner of Public Works, for three years, John N. Cole. 

Division of Highways. 
Associate Commissioner, for one year, Frank D. Kemp. 
Associate Commissioner, for two years, James W. Synan. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 

Associate Commissioner, for one year, Jesse B. Baxter. 
Associate Commissioner, for two years, Richard K. Hale. 

In the reorganization, changes in personnel and changes in 
the work assigned to different employees have resulted in a co- 
ordination of work that is believed to promise greatly increased 
efficiency in handling the duties and responsibilities of the De- 
partment. In carrying out the work of reorganization the 
following assignments have been made : — 

Executive Secretary for the Department, Frederick N. Wales. 

Division of Highways. 

Chief Engineer, Arthur W. Dean. 
Construction Engineer, Franklin C. Pillsbury. 
District Engineers : — 

District No. 1, Berkshire County, George A. Curtis. 

District No. 2, Franklin and Hampshire counties, H. D. Phillips. 

District No. 3, Hampden and Worcester counties, John A. Johnston. 

District No. 4, Middlesex County, F. D. Sabin. 

District No. 5, Essex and Suffolk counties, D. H. Dickinson. 

District No. 6, Norfolk and Bristol counties, R. W. Coburn. 

District No. 7, Plymouth, Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket counties, 
George H. Delano. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Mary A. Riley. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Fred Fair. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Chief Engineer, Frank W. Hodgdon. 

Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for Boston Harbor, John N. Ferguson. 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for harbors and waterways outside 
Boston Harbor, Francis L. Sellew. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Recording Secretary for the Division, Edna F. Townsend. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Cora I. Allen. 

Bridge Engineer for the Department, William F. Williams. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

Registrar, Frank A. Goodwin. 

Chief Clerk, Charles R. Gilley. 

Chief of Inspection Force, Albert S. Olsson. 

A detailed report is presented herewith, covering the activi- 
ties for the year of the Division of Waterways and Public 
Lands. 

JOHN N. COLE, 

Commissioner. 



WATERWAYS. 



DIVISION OF WATERWAYS AND PUBLIC 

LANDS. 



BOSTON HARBOR. 
The Commonwealth Flats at South Boston. 

Commonwealth Pier No. 5. 

During the year a considerable amount of repair work has 
been necessary at this pier. The downspouts have been 
changed, defects in the roofing remedied, minor alterations 
made in the heating system and the sashes and steel work re- 
painted. 

The downspouts leading from the roof of the head house have 
given trouble from time to time, and became, during the winter 
of 1919 and 1920, so defective as to make a change necessary. 
These downspouts were reconstructed by John Farquhar's Sons, 
Incorporated, at an expense of S3, 2 12. 

When the heating plant at this pier was installed it was 
planned so that the heat could be cut off from the passenger 
accommodations in the central shed if these were not in use. 
Practically, however, it was found necessary to heat these 
quarters much of the time to prevent the freezing of the water 
in the dry valve pits of the sprinkler system. During the year 
a portion of the records of the Department of Public Works 
have been moved to rooms in this part of the pier. In order 
to heat these rooms and the valve pits at all times, and to cut 
off the passenger quarter when not in use, a new valve has been 
inserted in the main steam pipe and a smaller pipe run to fit 
the radiators in the valve pits in the longshoremen's toilets. 
By this method considerable coal can be saved. As the larger 
part of the piping required was on hand at the pier, these 
changes were made at an expense of $1,251.03. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

No general painting has been done at the pier since it was 
built in 1913. During the year, as in previous years, inspectors 
and other employees when not needed on their usual work have 
been occupied in repainting the steel sash and other parts of 
the steel work. In this way the portions most seriously affected 
by the weather have been kept painted. At the present time, 
however, more repainting is required than can be accomplished 
by such intermittent work. During the coming year the steel 
work of the pier and the woodwork of the windows and doors 
of the head house should be repainted. 

Commonicealth Pier No. 6. 

When this pier was built and leased to the Boston Fish 
Market Corporation, the Commonwealth agreed to relay the 
paving within five years from the date of completion. The five 
years ended in October, 1918. At that time, however, the 
prices for doing such work were very high, and a portion of the 
paving was in fair condition. It was decided, therefore, with 
the assent of the corporation, to do only a part of the work 
and to postpone the remainder for a short time. In accordance 
with this plan a portion of the wharf frontage opposite the 
main buildings, and a large part of the central street from 
Northern Avenue to the southerly end of the main buildings, 
was repaved in the fall of 1918 and the spring of 1919, at a 
cost of $57,163.10. 

The remainder of the wharf paving is in such poor condition 
that the corporation is anxious to have it relaid. A part of 
the central street also needs attention, although the greater 
portion of it is in fair condition. The estimated cost of com- 
pleting this repaving at the present time is SI 10,000. A rec- 
ommendation for an appropriation for this work has been 
included in those submitted for the Governor's budget. 

Dry Dock. 

Under date of April 28, 1920, the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, represented by the Department of Public Works, 
Division of Waterways and Public Lands, gave to the United 
States of America a deed of a certain parcel of land, together 




Drt Dock no 338 December 22. isto U.S.S. Virginia in Dock Inner Section View From <fe of Caisson 




Commonwealth Dry Dock, Boston. 




Commonwealth Dry Dock, Boston. 



WATERWAYS. 9 

with a dry dock known as "Commonwealth Dry Dock, Boston," 
with the buildings and appurtenances in connection therewith, 
in the city of Boston. For this property, containing 4,396,480 
square feet, the United States has paid to the Commonwealth 
the sum of $4,158,385.58. Illustrations of this dock are shown 
herein, and details of its construction and cost are printed in 
the annual report of the Commission on Waterways and Public 
Lands for 1919. 

Dry Dock Avenue. 

At the date of the report of the Commission on Waterways 
and Public Lands for 1919, the paving of Dry Dock Avenue, 
under an agreement with the Navy Department, was com- 
pleted, with the exception of a small area where a building 
obstructed the completion of the sidewalk. During the year 
the paving has been finished by employees of the Division 
with material left by the contractor for the purpose. 

Development of Land South of Summer Street. 

During the year sales have been made of land south of 
Summer Street bordering on C and D streets and on Bullock 
Street, a new street laid out between C and D streets. 

Buildings have been constructed during the year on two of 
the lots previously sold, one bordering on Bullock Street, the 
other on D Street. 

In making these sales the Commonwealth has undertaken to 
lay out and construct railroad tracks so that cars can be de- 
livered alongside each of the lots sold. The New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad Company has agreed to place the 
cars on these tracks in the required positions without charge 
other than the freight rate for transporting goods from the 
point of origin to Boston. 

In order to connect a portion of the lots sold during the year 
with these tracks, about 80 tons of steel rails were purchased, 
together with the necessary ties, switches and incidental equip- 
ment. A contract was made with the J. F. Kennedy Company 
to lay about 3,310 feet of track and connect the same with the 
existing tracks. 

Under this contract 3,507 feet of track have been laid and 
eight switches placed. Rails and switches sufficient to build 



10 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

about 3,000 feet of track remain unused, but for such tracks 
extra ties would be needed. 

During the year an agreement has been made with the city 
of Boston by which the city agrees to lay out and build D 
Street from Fargo Street south, and Claflin Street between C 
and D streets; also lay out and repair the section of Fargo 
Street between B and C streets. The Commonwealth agreed 
to lay out and construct Bullock Street from Fargo Street to 
Claflin Street. Carrying out this agreement the city has al- 
ready laid out and partially reconstructed Fargo Street between 
B and C streets, and is preparing the plans for laying out D 
and Claflin streets. It will not be ready to do any construction 
work there before next year. In carrying out its part of the 
agreement, the Division has built a sewer in Bullock Street, 
from Fargo Street to Claflin Street, and is now engaged in 
paving the street under contract with the B. E. Grant Com- 
pany, dated July 19, 1920.. It is expected that the work of 
paving will be completed early in December. 

Reserved Channel Bulkhead. 

On July 13, 1921, while filling was being placed back of the 
bulkhead on the southerly side of the Reserved Channel, a 
section about 60 feet long broke and a small amount of filling 
washed out upon the flats between the bulkhead and the Re- 
served Channel. The William L. Miller Company was em- 
ployed to repair this break at a price of $6,974. This work, 
involving the building of about 100 feet of new bulkhead to 
close the gap, was completed on Sept. 1, 1920. 

Amount expended during the year, $45,561.30. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $347,975.15. 

Trolley Freight Shed. 
The freight shed built on the South Boston Flats to ac- 
commodate the trolley freight business during the war, and 
used later to load freight into railroad cars, caught fire on Aug. 
13, 1920, and was totally consumed except for the floor which 
was protected by the large quantity of freight in the building. 
The fire began during the noon hour at the end farthest from 



WATERWAYS. 11 

the office, and the building was in flames before the fire depart- 
ment could be of service. The wreckage has been cleared away, 
but it has not seemed advisable to rebuild the structure. 

The Commonwealth Flats at East Boston. 

The work of building an extension to the bulkhead, under 
contract of Sept. 3, 1919, with W. S. Rendle, was completed 
Dec. 20, 1919, at a cost of $73,283.24. On Feb. 13, 1920, a 
contract was made with John R. Burke to place earth filling 
back of this bulkhead. The contract price for this work was 
$22.90 for each and every hour of actual time that the dredge 
worked. This work was completed on May 28, 1920, at a cost 
of $13,224.75. 

The dredging and rehandling of material under contract 
dated March 14, 1916, with the Atlantic, Gulf & Pacific Com- 
pany, and under various extensions of this contract, was com- 
pleted Nov. 27, 1920. In all, 8,406,981 cubic yards of material 
were dredged or rehandled at East Boston or at City Point, 
South Boston. Of this amount, 4,978,673 cubic yards were 
used as filling at East Boston, and 3,428,308 cubic yards as 
filling at South Boston. The total cost of this work was 
$1,368,878.72. 

If advantage is to be taken of the material constantly being 
dredged in various portions of the harbor, and use made of 
such material for filling the Commonwealth flats, a contract 
similar to the one of March 14, 1916, should be made during 
the year so that this material may be rehandled and used in 
filling additional land at East Boston. In connection with this 
work the docks, slips and channel planned as a part of the im- 
provement can be excavated when the dredge is not fully 
occupied with the rehandling. 

During the latter part of the year the dredge was occupied 
in excavating what is planned to be the westerly berth of the 
first large pier to be built at East Boston. This will also form 
an approach to the wharves at Jeffries Point if the present 
channel is filled by the extension of the wharves of the Simpson's 
Patent Dry Dock Company toward the present harbor line. 

Studies made during the year for the development of the 
flats at East Boston show that a change should be made in the 
harbor lines. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Anchorage Basin. 

No work has been done in this basin during the year except 
the repairing of dolphins injured by the striking of vessels. 
The most westerly dolphin has been carried away so many 
times that it has been decided not to rebuild it. At present 
the three remaining dolphins are in good condition. 

Belle Isle Inlet. 

By chapter 10 of the Resolves of 1919 the Commission on 
Waterways and Public Lands was directed to make a survey 
of Belle Isle Inlet, in the vicinity of the Boston, Revere Beach 
& Lynn Railroad, and the State highway at Bennington Street, 
and to prepare plans and make estimates of the probable cost 
of constructing dikes and dredging the inlet from the State 
highway to the bridge across the inlet at Saratoga Street, and 
depositing the dredged material on the borders of the inlet; also 
cost of constructing culverts from the embankment of the rail- 
road at Bennington Street. 

This survey was made in the spring of 1920. The estimated 
cost of doing the work is as follows : — 

For excavating the channel and depositing the material on the 

adjoining marshes $283,000 

For building a landing . . 4,000 

Culverts : 

Bennington Street .......... 26,025 

Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad 9,612 

$322,637 

The cost of doing this work is large, owing to the fact that 
the ends of the inlet are closed at the present time by embank- 
ments and bridges, and it will probably be necessary to build 
a suction dredge on the spot, as it would be practically im- 
possible to get one in from the harbor. 

Hough's Neck, Quincy. 
The work of building the sea wall under contract of Sept. 
18, 1917, with Dennis F. Crowley was completed on June 19, 
1920, at a cost of $17,950.81. The city of Quincy has agreed 



WATERWAYS. 13 

to do certain filling back of this sea wall for the construction 
of a highway. 

Amount expended during the year, $12,677.58. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $19,999.85. 

Jeffries Yacht Club. 

Early in 1920 the Jeffries Yacht Club complained that the 
channel previously dredged to the club landing was shoaling as 
a result of the escape of material being rehandled at East Boston 
in connection with the filling there in progress. An examination 
of the locality showed that a portion at least of this shoaling 
was due to filling operations in the vicinity. 

On June 8, 1920, a contract was made with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company to dredge to a depth of 
6 feet at mean low water the channel leading to the landing of 
this club. The contract price for this dredging was 50 cents 
for each cubic yard, scow measurement. This work was com- 
pleted on July 31, 1920, at a cost of $1,728.50. 

Amount expended during the year, $1,961.90. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $2,961.90. 

Mystic River Dredging. 

In June, 1919, a request was made by the Merrimac Chemical 
Company for dredging by the Commonwealth of the channel 
in Mystic River in the vicinity of Maiden bridge. The com- 
pany proposed to excavate at its own expense a berth and 
basin in order to operate large steamers at its wharf under con- 
struction above this bridge. On July 23, 1919, a contribution 
of $15,000 was made by the company toward the cost of the 
work to be undertaken by the Commonwealth. 

A contract was made on Dec. 8, 1919, with the Boston 
Dredging Company to excavate the channel to a depth of 16 
feet at mean low water from the main channel below Maiden 
bridge to a point about 1,000 feet above the bridge. The price 
for this dredging was 50 cents for each cubic yard, scow meas- 
irement. The work was completed July 1, 1920, except for a 
shoal about 30 feet wide over the pipe of the Boston Consoli- 
lated Gas Company. This shoal was left in compliance with 
the request of the gas company that the covering over the 



14 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

pipe be undisturbed until provision was made for another pipe, 
so that the gas supply of the city would not be cut off during 
dredging. As the company could not have this new pipe ready 
for some time the contractor, upon the completion of the re- 
mainder of the work, was relieved of the responsibility for 
dredging this shoal. The channel will be completed when the 
new gas pipe is finished and put into operation. 

The Beacon Oil Company, on Nov. 12, 1919, requested the 
Commonwealth to dredge in this river to enable vessels to reach 
the wharf of the company. The dredging desired included a 
berth at this wharf and a channel giving an approach to the 
berth. A contribution of $50,000 was made by the company 
to cover cost of dredging the berth and a portion of the ap- 
proach channel. On Dec. 11, 1919, a contract was made with 
the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company for dredging 
to a depth of 30 feet at mean low water an area in Mystic 
River near the mouth of Island End River. The contract price 
for this dredging was 65 cents for each cubic yard, scow meas- 
urement. This work was completed March 30, 1920, at a cost 
of $73,340.80. 

Amount expended during the year, $133,549.47. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $397,838.78. 

Orient Heights Dredging. 

Work under contract of Oct. 3, 1919, with the Gerrish Dredg- 
ing Company for excavating a channel at Orient Heights and 
Harbor View was completed Aug. 28, 1920. In connection with 
this dredging it was found necessary to provide a wooden box 
culvert to conduct drainage from the area west of Saratoga 
Street across the flats being filled with material dredged from 
the channel. The William L. Miller Company was employed 
to build the culvert, and after the completion of the work to 
remove the wood work, leaving a clear outlet for the drainage. 
The cost of the dredging was $27,169, and of building and re- 
moving the wooden culvert, $6,071. 

Amount expended during the year, $19,719.53. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $43,090.67. 



WATERWAYS. 15 



Weir River Dredging. 

The dredging of this river under contract of Sept. 15, 1919, 
with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company, was 
completed Nov. 27, 1920. The greater part of the work was 
finished in the spring of the year, but as some shoals were 
found which could not be removed before the summer excursion 
boats began their trips, completion was delayed until after the 
boats stopped running in the fall. 

This channel is now not less than 275 feet wide and 12 feet 
deep from the main harbor channel to the wharf of the Nan- 
tasket Beach Steamboat Company at Nantasket. In all, 
236,492 cubic yards of material were removed at a cost of 
$125,340.76. Toward this cost a contribution of $25,000 was 
made by the steamboat company. 

Amount expended during the year, $88,916.97. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $124,580.10. 

Winthrop Harbor Dredging. 

A contract was made on Sept. 10, 1920, with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company to excavate a basin in 
Winthrop Harbor between the United States government land- 
ing and the wharf of the Winthrop Yacht Club. The contract 
price for this dredging was 47.9 cents for each cubic yard, scow 
measurement. Toward the cost of the work a contribution of 
$1,000 has been made by the Winthrop Yacht Club. The work 
has not been commenced, but is expected to be completed 
early in the spring. 

United States Harbor Lines in Chelsea Creek and 

Mystic River. 

In view of the numerous requests for extension of work be- 
yond the established United States harbor lines, the Secretary 
of War deemed it best to consider a revision of these lines. On 
March 11, 1920, hearing was held before the Boston Harbor 
Line Board on the proposal to change these lines in Chelsea 
Creek and Mystic River. At this hearing various suggestions 



16 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

were presented to make the pierhead and bulkhead lines co- 
incident. 

After hearing all parties and considering all the suggestions, 
the Harbor Line Board recommended the establishment of new, 
coincident pierhead and bulkhead lines and they were ap- 
proved by the Secretary of War July 31, 1920. The changes 
bring the lines into conformity with proposed improvements, 
and will be of much assistance in the development of the 
harbor. 

Haywards Creek. 

In continuing development at Haywards Creek, the Division, 
on May 12, 1920, made an agreement with the Bethlehem 
Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., providing for definite co-opera- 
tion between the Commonwealth and the corporation in making 
certain improvements. By the terms of this agreement the 
corporation agreed to build, at its own expense, a floating dry 
dock with the necessary appurtenances; to construct, at a cost 
not to exceed $50,000, a bulkhead and culvert in and across 
this creek; to do certain dredging and to deposit material in 
the rear of the bulkhead. In consideration of the value of this 
work the Commonwealth, on May 12, 1920, deeded to the cor- 
poration a parcel of land containing 705,608.7 square feet, in- 
cluding the site for the dry dock and its appurtenances. The 
leases of March 28, 1917, and Oct. 25, 1917, to the Fore River 
Shipbuilding Corporation were terminated and a new lease was 
entered into under date of May 12, 1920. 

To hasten this work and provide a berth at the proposed 
Commonwealth Pier, a contract was made on May 10, 1920, 
with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company for 
dredging this berth and the channel leading thereto. The ma- 
terial, so far as possible, was to be excavated by a hydraulic 
dredge and deposited on the flats at the upper end of Haywards 
Creek near Quincy Adams. 

The Massachusetts Oil Refining Company, expecting to use 
this berth, made a contribution of $10,000 toward the cost of 
the work. As the approach channel was to cross certain flats 
which the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., planned 
to excavate, that corporation agreed to pay for the portion of 



WATERWAYS. 



17 



the work within the area which it proposed to dredge. The 
work was completed on Aug. 13, 1920, when 200,232 cubic 
yards of material had been dredged at a cost of $98,773.56. Of 
this cost the Commonwealth paid $61,291.36. 

Plans for the construction of a State pier in this locality are 
being prepared, and it is expected that building will be com- 
menced during the coming year. This pier will have track 
connections with the Fore River Railroad, as well as highway 
connection. The berth alongside the site of this pier has al- 
ready been dredged to the depth of 30 feet at mean low water. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



RIVERS, HARBORS, TIDEWATERS AND FORESHORES, 
EXCLUSIVE OF BOSTON HARBOR. 

By chapter 481 of the Acts of the year 1909 the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners was authorized and directed 
to undertake such work for the improvement, development, 
maintenance and protection of rivers, harbors, tidewaters and 
foreshores within the Commonwealth as it may deem to be 
reasonable and proper, and to expend during the years 1910, 
1911 and 1912 a sum not exceeding $300,000, not more than 
$100,000 to be expended in any one year, provided, however, 
that an unexpended balance in any year may be used in the 
succeeding year. This act provided that the Board shall con- 
sider the general public advantage of the proposed work, the 
local interest therein as manifested by municipal or other con- 
tributions therefor, the importance of the industrial or com- 
mercial and other interests to be especially served thereby, and 
any other material considerations affecting the feasibility, neces- 
sity or advantage of the proposed work or the expenditure 
therefor; that no work shall be begun until after a public 
hearing has been held and a survey and estimate of cost made; 
that a city or town may appropriate money for the improve- 
ment of rivers, harbors, tidewaters and foreshores within its 
jurisdiction, the money so appropriated to be paid into the 
State treasury, to be expended by the Board for said purposes; 
and that the city or town may assume liability for all damages 
to property suffered by any person by any taking of land, or 
of any right, interest or easement in land within the city or 
town made by the Board for the purposes authorized by the 
act. 

The general policy inaugurated by this act has been continued 
by subsequent legislation in 1912, 1916 and 1919. Chapter 231 
of the General Acts of 1919 authorized the expenditure of 
$750,000 during the years 1919, 1920 and 1921, not more than 
$250,000 to be expended in any one year; provided, however, 
that an unexpended balance in any one year may be used in 
the succeeding year. 



WATERWAYS. 19 

Petitions under the act of 1909 aforesaid have been filed 
during the year with the Division for surveys and improve- 
ments in the following localities: Acushnet River, New Bed- 
ford; Bass River, Yarmouth; Brant Rock, Marshfield; East 
Bay, Barnstable; Falmouth Inner Harbor, Falmouth; Herring 
River, Harwich; Katama Bay, Edgartown; Little Good Harbor 
River, Gloucester; Menamsha Inlet; Pines River, Revere; 
Point Shirley sea wall, Winthrop; Plymouth Harbor; Scituate 
Harbor; Stage Cove, Gloucester; Witchmere Harbor, Harwich. 

Except for the holding of public hearings, and the making of 
surveys and estimates of cost in some instances, no conclusive 
action as to allotments has been taken during the year for 
carrying into effect improvements under petitions relating to 
Little Good Harbor River, Gloucester; Menamsha Inlet; Pines 
River, Revere; Point Shirley^ sea wall, Winthrop; Plymouth 
Harbor; and Stage Cove, Gloucester. 

For information relating to work accomplished in various 
harbors and rivers in the Commonwealth not specifically de- 
scribed in this report, attention is called to the annual reports 
of the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners and to the 
annual reports of the Commission on Waterways and Public 
Lands for the years 1916 to 1919, inclusive, and to the tables 
in the Appendix which show localities, character of work, ap- 
propriations, contributions and expenditures by the Common- 
wealth and certain appropriations and expenditures by the 
Federal government. 

Acushnet River. 

On April 23, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of the 
mayor of the city of New Bedford and others for dredging a 
channel in Acushnet River to a depth of 25 feet at mean low 
water from the turning basin above Fish Island to a point 
below Coggeshall Street bridge. A contract was made on Aug. 
2, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Com- 
pany to dredge a channel from the turning basin above Fish 
Island to a point about 750 feet south of Coggeshall Street 
bridge in Acushnet River in the city of New Bedford and town 
of Falrhaven, at the following prices: dredging channel and 
disposing of the dredged material, including boulders 1 cubic 



20 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

yard or less in volume, 52 cents per cubic yard, scow measure- 
ment; excavating boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard and not 
greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, and disposing of the 
same, $16 per cubic yard. 

The contract provides that the channel shall be 25 feet deep 
at mean low water and shall be not over 350 feet wide at the 
connection with the turning basin, narrowing to a width of 90 
feet at a point about 500 feet north of the basin and continuing 
at this width about 4,200 feet to the northerly limit; provided, 
however, that the width of the entrance at the turning basin 
may be reduced at the option of the Division if it is found 
that the total quantity of material to be removed will exceed 
216,000 cubic yards. 

Work under this contract is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $75,960.27. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $75,962.42. 

Bass River, Yarmouth. 

On April 23, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of the 
selectmen and others, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, 
for additional dredging in Bass River in Dennis and Yarmouth. 
A contract with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting 
Company was made on June 3, 1920, to do certain dredging at 
Herring River and Witchmere Harbor, and to redredge the 
channel at the entrance to Bass River, at the following prices: 
redredging the channels and disposing of the dredged material, 
including boulders 1 cubic yard or less in volume, $1.20 per 
cubic yard, scow measurement; excavating boulders in excess 
of 1 cubic yard and not greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, 
and disposing of the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

This work, completed Aug. 3, 1920, comprised the redredging 
of the channel to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water and a 
width of 60 feet for a distance of about 1,500 feet inshore from 
the 6-foot contour at a cost of $14,404.80. 

Amount expended during the year, $15,086.99. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $89,104.74. 




WATERWAYS. 21 



Brant Rock, Marshfield. 

On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of the 
selectmen of the town of Marshfield, under chapter 481 of the 
Acts of 1909, for the protection of the sea wall built by the 
town south of Brant Rock. A contract was made on Sept. 10, 
1920, with William H. Connor to build spur jetties in front of 
an existing masonry sea wall immediately south of Brant Rock, 
at the following price: for furnishing materials and building 
concrete spur jetties including excavation, backfilling trenches, 
disposal of surplus material, furnishing, erecting and removing 
forms, and all incidental work, $21.50 for each cubic yard of 
concrete measured in place in the completed work. 

This work, completed Oct. 25, 1920, comprised the building 
of seven concrete spur jetties, 50 feet long and 100 feet apart 
on centers, with a concrete buttress extending to the wall at 
six of the jetties. The seventh or northerly jetty was built out 
from a timber bulkhead. The purpose of the jetties is to col- 
lect and hold sand in front of the wall to prevent undermining 
by the sea. The buttresses are intended to help support the 
wall which showed some evidence of weakness. The total cost 
of the work under this contract was $3,332.50. 

Amount expended during the year, $3,138.74. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $4,104.58. 

Cohasset Harbor. 

In the early summer the attention of the Division was 
called to certain shoaling which had narrowed the harbor width 
from 90 feet to a minimum of 30 feet. Under an arrangement 
with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company, the 
shoals in the outer portion of the channel were removed and a 
depth of 6 feet at mean low water secured. The work was done 
at a cost of $2,210. 

East Bay, Osterville. 
On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on the petitions of the 
selectmen of Barnstable and others, under chapter 481 of the 
Acts of 1909, for further dredging in East Bay. A contract 
was made on June 28, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and 
Contracting Company for dredging a channel and a basin in 



22 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

East Bay at the following prices: dredging channel and basin 
and disposing of the dredged material, including boulders 1 
cubic yard or less in volume, 78 cents per cubic yard, scow 
measurement; excavating boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard 
and not greater than 5 cubic yards in volume and disposing 
of the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

This work, completed Oct. 22, 1920, comprised the dredging 
of a channel about 2,700 feet long, 75 feet wide and 6 feet deep 
at mean low water from the 6-foot contour in Nantucket Sound 
to a basin of the same depth and about 6.5 acres in area in this 
bay. 

Toward the cost of this work a contribution of $10,000 has 
been received from individuals interested in the improvement. 

Amount expended during the year, $44,097.21. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $67,627. 

Ellisville Harbor, Plymouth. 

The heavy storm of Nov. 6 and 7, 1919, closed the outer end 
of the channel dredged by the Commonwealth in 1918, and 
reopened the old channel around the inshore end of the dike 
built to close it. To repair this damage a contract was made 
on May 10, 1920, with George A. Finney and P. H. Marsh to 
redredge the channel through the beach and to build a dike 
across the outlet on the southeasterly side of the inshore end 
of the new channel, for the lump sum of $1,000. This work, 
completed July 31, 1920, resulted in the restoration of the 
channel to the dimensions originally dredged, closed the old 
entrance and made the harbor accessible to small fishing craft 
at about half tide. The cost of work under this contract was 
$1,000. 

Amount expended during the year, $3,888. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $15,144.82. 

Fall River Harbor. 
State Pier. 

Reference is made to the report of the Commission on Water- 
ways and Public Lands for the year ending Nov. 30, 1916, 
setting forth the provisions of chapter 279 of the General Acts 
of 1915 authorizing the construction of a public pier and other 
necessary structures and connections on the water front of 



WATERWAYS. 23 

Fall River; the various sketch plans, studies and estimates 
of cost; the votes passed by the former Board of Harbor and 
Land Commissioners; the license granted to the Old Colony 
Railroad Company to do certain filling in Fall River Harbor 
adjoining its Globe freight yard, enabling it to make the neces- 
sary railway connections with the proposed pier; and con- 
ferences held with the mayor and other officials of Fall River. 
The city has not as yet purchased the necessary site for the 
pier. 

Falmouth Inner Harbor. 

On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on the petition of John 
J. Veeder and others, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, 
for increasing the anchorage area in this harbor. A contract 
was made on June 3, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and 
Contracting Company for dredging this harbor, at the follow- 
ing prices: dredging and disposing of the dredged material, 
including boulders 1 cubic yard or less in volume, 58 cents per 
cubic yard, scow measurement; excavating boulders in excess 
of 1 cubic yard and not greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, 
and disposing of the same, $12 per cubic yard. 

The work under this contract, completed July 9, 1920, com- 
prised the widening of the upper part of the harbor and its 
extension northerly about 300 feet to a depth of 6 feet at mean 
low water, adding about 78,000 square feet to its anchorage 
area. The cost of this work was $9,368.74. 

Amount expended during the year, $10,058. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $81,538.57. 

Gloucester Harbor. 

Work in progress at the date of the report of the Commission 
on Waterways and Public Lands for 1919 under contract of 
July 28, 1919, with the Boston Dredging Company to dredge 
a channel westerly, northerly and northeasterly from Five 
Pound Island to a depth of 16 feet at mean low water and 
to build a pile dolphin opposite a turn in the channel is not 
yet completed. A portion of the ledge remains to be removed 
and the pile dolphin is yet to be built. 

Amount expended during the year, $19,010.88. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $89,767.21. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Herring River, Harwich. 

On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of the 
selectmen of Harwich, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, 
for dredging in Herring River. It seemed best to combine the 
work at this river with that asked for at Bass River and Witch- 
mere Harbor, and a contract was made on June 3, 1920, with 
the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company to include 
the redredging of the channel to this river to a depth of 6 
feet at mean low water and to a width not to exceed 50 feet, 
at the following prices: redredging the channels and disposing 
of the dredged material, including boulders 1 cubic yard or 
less in volume, $1.20 per cubic yard of material, scow meas- 
urement; excavating boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard and 
not greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, and disposing of 
the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

In late October no work at this river had been commenced. 
It was therefore concluded, in view of the high unit prices 
under the contract, to relieve the contractor from the necessity 
for carrying out the work, in the hope that the Division may 
be able to secure in the coming season a more favorable price 
for this dredging. 

Katama Bay, Edgartown. 

On April 21, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of Antone 
K. Silva and others, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, for 
a harbor of refuge at Katama Bay by dredging through South 
Beach. After this hearing an investigation was made by the 
engineer and an inspection by the Division. It became clear 
that while the improvement is undoubtedly of value there is 
considerable uncertainty as to whether the opening will main- 
tain itself after it has been dredged. Under these circumstances 
arrangements have been made for the dredging to be done by 
local parties interested in the improvement, at a cost to the 
Commonwealth of not more than $2,500. 

Lobster Cove, Gloucester. 

In June, 1920, the attention of the Division was called 
to the necessity for dredging in Lobster Cove. It was con- 
cluded to combine this work with certain dredging in Newbury- 



WATERWAYS. 25 

port Harbor, and on Sept. 1, 1920, a contract was made with 
the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company to include 
the dredging of a basin at the entrance to Lobster Cove, 
Gloucester, to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water, at the fol- 
lowing prices: dredging basin and disposing of the dredged 
material, including boulders 1 cubic yard or less in volume, 
65 cents per cubic yard of excavated material, scow measure- 
ment; excavating boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard and not 
greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, and disposing of the 
same, $18 per cubic yard. 

This work, completed Oct. 2, 1920, comprised the dredging of 
a portion of a shoal on the easterly side of the entrance to this 
cove to make a basin about 2 acres in area and 6 feet deep 
at mean low water. 

Amount expended during the year, $15,443.28. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $34,547.26. 

Lynn Harbor and Saugus River. 

The work of dredging basins in Lynn Harbor and Saugus 
River, in progress at the date of the report of the Commission 
on Waterways and Public Lands for 1919, under contract with 
the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company, was com- 
pleted Dec. 4, 1919. This work consisted of deepening the 
basin previously dredged by the Commonwealth at the upper 
end of the harbor near the Nahant shore to a depth of 8 feet 
at mean low water, extending this basin to the yacht club 
floats at the head of the harbor, and dredging a basin in Saugus 
River in front of the premises of the Point of Pines Yacht 
Club to a depth of 7 feet at mean low water. 

Amount expended during the year, $1,670.04. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $128,442.35. 

New Bedford State Pier. 
By chapter 693 of the Acts of 1914 the Board of Harbor and 
Land Commissioners was authorized to reconstruct and extend 
the present southerly pier owned by the city of New Bedford, 
and to reconstruct the pier adjoining the same on the north; 
to build sheds or other buildings on said piers, and to provide 
the necessary equipment and appliances for handling freight 



26 DEPARTMENT OE PUBLIC WORKS. 

and receiving passengers; to fill solid and dredge, and to do 
such other work as might be necessary to carry out the pur- 
poses of the act for the improvement of the harbor and terminal 
facilities of the city of New Bedford. The appropriation was 
$350,000. 

The original contract for this pier was made with W. H. 
Ellis & Son Company Jan. 5, 1915. Attention is called to the 
annual reports of the Commission on Waterways and Public 
Lands for 1916, 1917, 1918 and 1919. 

The new one-story wooden freight shed and the two-story 
wooden immigration shed were equipped by the General Fire 
Extinguisher Company of Providence, R. I., with a dry-pipe 
system of automatic fire sprinklers at a total cost of $7,523.51. 
Additional fire apparatus was also installed consisting of eight 
sets, 50-foot lengths 1^-inch linen hose and hose racks, and 
twelve 2^-gallon fire extinguishers. 

An office was built in the second story of the immigration 
shed, plumbing repaired and the heating apparatus rearranged. 

One 9,000-pound electrically operated freight elevator was 
installed, together with steel tower for the same. 

On Dec. 5, 1919, the use and occupancy by the New Bedford 
Storage Warehouse Company for a period of three months of 
the New Bedford State Pier property was authorized. The 
results of this arrangement were so satisfactory that this permit 
has been renewed and is now operative. 

The question of leasing the State pier for a term of years has 
been under consideration by the Division during the year. 
In accordance with the provisions of chapter 375 of the Acts 
of 1920 the mayor and aldermen of New Bedford were notified 
on Oct. 22, 1920, of the decision of the Division to lease this 
pier. At the request of the city a public hearing was held 
on this matter in New Bedford on Nov. 10, 1920. No further 
action has been taken by the Division. 

Newburyport Harbor. 

On April 23, 1920, hearing was held with reference to certain 

dredging in Newburyport Harbor, under chapter 481 of the 

Acts of 1909, for the purpose of forming a harbor of refuge. 

The Division was later informed of the purchase by the city 



WATERWAYS. 27 

of the dock between Central Wharf and the wharf of the 
Philadelphia & Reading Coal and Iron Company. It was 
decided to combine the work requested at Newburyport with 
that at Lobster Cove, Gloucester, and on Sept. 1, 1920, a con- 
tract was made with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting 
Company to include the dredging of a basin between the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Wharf and Central Wharf in Newburyport 
to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water, at the following prices: 
dredging basin and disposing of the dredged material, including 
boulders one cubic yard or less in volume, $1.65 per cubic yard 
of excavated material, scow measurement; excavating boulders 
in excess of 1 cubic yard and not greater than 5 cubic yards in 
volume, and disposing of the same, $18 per cubic yard. 

After the making of this contract some difficulty was found 
in securing the necessary releases from the owners of adjacent 
wharf property in Newburyport and no work has therefore 
been commenced. 

Amount expended during the year, $9.02. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $115.97. 

Popponesset Bay and West Bay. 

The work of dredging channels in Popponesset Bay and West 
Bay, in progress at the date of the report of the commission 
on Waterways and Public Lands for 1919, under contract 
with John R. Burke, was completed Aug. 3, 1920. This work 
comprised the dredging of the channel at the entrance to 
Popponesset Bay and West Bay 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep 
at mean low water, and the dredging of the natural channel in 
Popponesset Bay 60 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low 
water to a point on the westerly shore of the upper part of the 
bay about 800 feet beyond where the channel formerly ended. 

Amount expended during the year, $16,610.78. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $35,812.19. 

Scituate Harbor. 

On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of Walter 

Haynes and others, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, for 

dredging in Scituate Harbor near the town wharf and anchorage 

basin. A contract was made on May 24, 1920, with the Bay 



28 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

State Dredging and Contracting Company for widening the 
channel opposite the town wharf and enlarging the basins 
to the north and south of this wharf, at the following prices: 
dredging channels and basins and disposing of the dredged 
material, including boulders 1 cubic yard or less in volume, 
59.8 cents per cubic yard, scow measurement; excavating 
boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard and not greater than 5 
cubic yards, and disposing of the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

This work was completed July 20, 1920, and resulted in the 
addition of about 13,000 square feet to the basin south of the 
town wharf; about 7,500 square feet to the basin north of the 
wharf; widening the channel about 30 feet on the curve opposite 
the south basin; and restoring the depth in the channel to 8 
feet at mean low water. The basins were dredged to a depth 
of 6 feet at mean low water, and a small shoal in the channel 
to the yacht club pier removed. The cost of this work was 
$30,030.95. 

Amount expended during the year, $30,920.16. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $104,963.92. 

Scituate Sea Walls, North Scituate. 

The storm of Nov. 6 and 7, 1919, overturned about 400 feet 
of masonry wall built by the Commonwealth in 1906 and 1907 
at North Scituate. On Feb. 24, 1920, a contract was made 
with William H. Connor to remove an old masonry wall over- 
turned by the sea; to build in its place a concrete sea wall with 
spur jetties and rilling; and to build spur jetties with a con- 
crete footing course in front of an existing masonry wall, near 
Beach Street in North Scituate, at the following prices: fur- 
nishing materials and building concrete sea wall, spur jetties 
and footing course, including removal of old masonry wall, 
excavation, backfilling trenches, disposal of surplus material, 
furnishing, erecting and removing forms, and all incidental 
work, $14 per cubic yard of concrete, measured in place in the 
completed work; additional material for filling back of wall to 
required slope between wall and highway, $2 per cubic yard of 
additional material furnished in place. 

This work was completed Aug. 12, 1920, and resulted in the 
removal of the masonry wall overturned by the November 



WATERWAYS. 29 

storm, the building of 343 linear feet of concrete sea wall, the 
building of 21 concrete spur jetties, each 15 feet long, and the 
placing of 936 cubic yards of filling back of the wall. In addi- 
tion, repairs were made to 185 linear feet of masonry wall 
immediately north of the new wall. This work comprised a 
footing course of concrete under the face of the wall to prevent 
it from being undermined by the action of the sea, the building 
of 7 concrete spur jetties, each 15 feet long, and the placing of 
a coping course of concrete to raise the height to that of the 
adjoining walls. Backfilling was placed to the new top. The 
total cost of the work was $14,730.33. A contribution of $3,500 
was made by the county of Plymouth, and an equal amount 
contributed by the town of Scituate, toward this cost. 

Amount expended during the year, $17,060.75. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $69,652.61. 

Waquoit Bay, Falmouth and Mashpee. 

The work of repairing the stone breakwater on the easterly 
side of the entrance to this bay, in progress at the date of the 
report of the Commission on Waterways and Public Lands 
for 1919, under contract with E. S. Belden & Sons, Incorpo- 
rated, was completed June 7, 1920. About 1,386.03 tons of 
stone were placed, at a total cost of $6,108.23. 

Amount expended during the year, $9,094.81. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $31,285.40. 

West Bay, Barnstable. 

On April 23, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of Nathan 
D. Bill and others, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, for 
dredging in West Bay. A contract was made on July 1, 1920, 
with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company to 
dredge a channel not more than 50 feet wide on the bottom and 
6 feet deep at mean low water to follow generally the existing 
channel from the 6-foot contour above the entrance between 
the jetties to the 6-foot contour about 1,400 feet below the 
drawbridge to Little Island, at the following prices: dredging 
channel and disposing of the dredged material, including boulders 
1 cubic yard or less in volume, 78 cents per cubic yard of ma- 
terial, scow measurement; excavating boulders in excess of 1 



30 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

cubic yard and not greater than 5 cubic yards in volume, and 
disposing of the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

Toward the cost of this work a contribution of $10,000 has 
been made by individuals interested in the improvement. 

Work under this contract is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $8,798.13. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $59,244.47. 

Westfield River. 

The work of extending two of the stone jetties built by the 
Commonwealth in this river, near the old county bridge, was 
completed during the year. The second jetty upstream from 
the bridge was lengthened about 25 feet, and the fourth jetty, 
15 feet. The object of this work is to deflect the current to 
prevent further erosion of the westerly bank of the river below 
the bridge. 

Amount expended during the year $1,296.90. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $6,037.29. 

Witchmere Harbor. 

On April 2, 1920, hearing was held on a petition of the select- 
men of Harwich, under chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909, for 
dredging an entrance to Witchmere Harbor. It was decided 
to combine this work with that asked for at Bass River and 
Herring River, and a contract was made on June 3, 1920, with 
the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company to include 
the redredging of the channel to this harbor to a depth of 
6 feet at mean low water and a width not to exceed 50 feet, 
at the following prices: redredging channel and disposing of the 
dredged material, including boulders 1 cubic yard or less in 
volume, $1.20 per cubic yard, scow measurement; excavating 
boulders in excess of 1 cubic yard and not greater than 5 cubic 
yards in volume, and disposing of the same, $20 per cubic yard. 

In late October no work at this harbor had been commenced. 
It was therefore concluded, in view of the high unit prices 
under the contract, to relieve the contractor from the necessity 
of carrying out the work in the hope that the Division may 
be able to secure in the coming season a more favorable price 
for this dredging. 



WATERWAYS. 31 



MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. 

Great Ponds. 

Jurisdiction over great ponds belonging to the Common- 
wealth, these ponds containing in their natural state 10 or more 
acres of land, was conferred upon the former Board of Harbor 
and Land Commissioners by chapter 318 of the Acts of 1888, 
and further authority given that Board by chapter 379 of the 
Acts of 1904, to sell and convey or lease any of the islands 
owned by the State in the great ponds, subject to the approval 
of the Governor and Council. 

During the year the Division has made examinations, held 
conferences or taken other proceedings relative to Asnaconcomet 
Pond, Hubbardston; Lake Winthrop, Holliston; Lake Whalom, 
Lunenburg; Long Pond, Brewster and Harwich; Morey's Hole 
Pond, Plymouth; Morse Pond, Wellesley; Tisbury Great Pond, 
Tisburv; White Island Pond, Plvmouth. 

A list of the lakes and ponds of the State with areas of 10 or 
more acres, given by counties, is printed in the report of the 
Commission on Waterways and Public Lands on "Water Re- 
sources of Massachusetts, 1918." 

Conserving and Equalizing the Flow of Water in Rivers 

and Streams. 

By chapter 87 of the Resolves of 1918 a special commission 
on the water resources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
was created, including in its membership the chairman of the 
Commission on Waterways and Public Lands, to investigate 
the water resources of the Commonwealth, and their report was 
printed as Senate Document No. 298 of 1919. 

By chapter 359, Acts of 1909, chapter 564, Acts of 1912, and 
chapter 84, Resolves of 1917, co-operation was established be- 
tween the Commonwealth and the Water Resources Branch of 
the Lmited States Geological Survey, whereby data relating to 
the gauging of streams within the Commonwealth and other 
work of a similar character carried on by the said survey have 



32 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

been obtained for use by the Division, said data being available 
for other departments of the Commonwealth. 

The latest data, being a summary of Stream Flow Records 
for various periods ending Sept. 30, 1920, are printed on pages 
78-95 of this report. 

State Boundaries. 

Chapter 1 of the Revised Laws, section 4, requires that the 
Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners shall in the year 
1905, and every fifth year thereafter, examine and inspect all 
the monuments or other marks defining the location of the 
boundary lines of the Commonwealth, and if any of them have 
been injured, displaced, removed or lost said Commissioners 
shall, in co-operation with persons duly authorized by the ad- 
joining State, restore them or replace them with suitable stone 
monuments, and in the same manner set suitable stone monu- 
ments at points not properly marked where the State boundary 
is intersected by the boundary of any counties, cities or towns 
in the Commonwealth or by a highway or railroad. By chapter 
225, Acts of 1920, a sum not exceeding $3,000 was made 
available for services and expenses in the inspection of State 
boundary monuments. 

The perambulation of the boundary line between Massachu- 
setts and Rhode Island was made conjointly with Everett A. 
Kingsley, representing Rhode Island, and was commenced 
Sept. 15 and finished Sept. 29, 1920. All the marks were visited 
on the dates given in the tables, 1 and found to be in good con- 
dition and properly set, with certain exceptions. 1 

The perambulation of the boundary line between Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut was made conjointly with Henry R. 
Buck, representing Connecticut, and was commenced July 19 
and finished Aug. 7, 1920. All the marks were visited on the 
dates given in the tables, 1 and found to be in good condition 
and properly set, with a certain exception. 1 

The perambulation of the boundary line between Massachu- 
setts and New York was made conjointly with Homer C. Kline, 
representing New York, and was commenced Oct. 6 and finished 
Oct. 23, 1920. All the marks were visited on the dates given 

1 Not printed. In the files of the Department. 



WATERWAYS. 33 

in the tables, 1 and found to be in good condition and properly 
set, with certain exceptions. 1 

The perambulation of the boundary line between Massachu- 
setts and Vermont was made conjointly with Herbert M. 
Mcintosh, representing Vermont, and was commenced Aug. 16 
and finished Aug. 21, 1920. All the marks were visited on the 
dates given in the tables, 1 and found to be in good condition 
and properly set, with certain exceptions. 1 

The perambulation of the boundary line between Massachu- 
setts and New Hampshire was made conjointly with M. C. 
Knapp, representing New Hampshire, and was commenced Aug. 
23 and finished Sept. 3, 1920. All the marks were visited on 
the dates given in the tables, 1 and found to be in good condi- 
tion and properly set, with a certain exception. 1 

Province Lands. 

The territory known as the Province Lands in Provincetown, 
belonging to the Commonwealth, over which the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners was given general care and 
supervision by the provisions of chapter 470 of the Acts of 
1893, comprises about 3,290 acres lying northerly and westerly 
of the line described in that act. 

Reclamation work on these lands was commenced in 1894, 
and under the direction of a superintendent has been carried 
on in each succeeding year. Two methods are used to prevent 
movement of the sand. The barren dunes are first covered 
with brush or planted with beach grass. The grass is pulled in 
bunches about 2 inches thick for transplanting in rows about 4 
feet apart and 6 inches deep, and so transplanted lives between 
four and five years. This work is followed and reinforced by 
the transplanting of trees and shrubs. 

During the year work on these lands has been continued in 
accordance with these methods. In the winter and fall of this 
year 20 acres of sand dunes were covered with brush. In the 
spring 5 acres of bayberry were transplanted and in the early 
summer 93,000 pines. The work of destroying gypsy-moth 
clusters was continued so vigorously that very little damage 
was done by the moths upon these lands this year. 

1 Not printed. In the files of the Department. 



34 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The parking area of 8,000 square feet, for the use of auto- 
mobiles, built in 1919 at the end of the drive, on the bluff 
overlooking the ocean, received a coating of gravel screenings 
in June and a covering of road tar in the fall. This area is 
now in excellent condition for use. 

The sum of $183.20 has been paid into the State treasury 
during the year, being the amount received from licenses issued 
to various parties to cultivate and pick cranberries on the bogs, 
and to mow meadowlands. 

Amount expended during the year, $4,238.69. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $85,129.97. 

Massachusetts Atlas Sheets and Town Boundary 

Atlases. 

Under authority of chapter 57, Resolves of 1890, chapter 42, 
Resolves of 1891, chapter 360, Acts of 1900, and chapter 69, 
Resolves of 1915, 3,396 atlas sheets of the map of the Common- 
wealth and 4 town boundary atlases have been sold during the 
year, for which $498.70 was received and forwarded to the 
Treasurer and Receiver-General. 

No atlases were delivered during the year under the authority 
of chapter 360, Acts of 1900, as amended by chapter 484, Acts 
of 1909. 

Re-establishment of Certain Triangulation Points. 

By chapter 223 of the General Acts of 1915 the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners was authorized to make such 
surveys and do such other work as may be required by any 
order of the Land Court; to re-establish and permanently mark 
certain stations previously established in connection with the 
topographical survey of the Commonwealth and the town 
boundary survey, which have been lost or destroyed; and to 
obtain the geographical position of such new points and sta- 
tions as may be required from time to time by the court. The 
Board was allowed to expend not exceeding $1,000 from the 
sum of $1,500 which may be annually paid out of the State 
treasury. 



WATERWAYS. 35 

During the year the location of the following triangulation 
stations was determined and permanently marked on the 
ground, and their geographical positions furnished to the Land 
Court: 5 stations in Peabody and Salem; 3 stations in Way- 
land and Sudbury; 18 stations in Nantucket. The following 
triangulation stations were marked with a composition plate 
bolted to ledges known as: "Park Ledge" in Peabody, and 
"Walbach and Rice Ledge" in Sudbury. 

Further details of those stations are in the files of the Division. 

Amount expended during the year, $1,000. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1920, $5,708.19. 



Licenses granted during the Year. 

Nos. 

1. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of Public Works, 

for license to repair and strengthen Warren bridge on Charles 
River, Boston. Granted Dec. 8, 1919. 

2. Petition of the Ace High Chocolate Company for license to construct 

foundations for a building in and over Fort Point Channel, Boston. 
Granted Dec. 8, 1919. 

3. Petition of the Haverhill Electric Company for license to lay a sub- 

marine cable in Merrimack River, northerly of the Haverhill- 
Groveland bridge, in Haverhill and Groveland. Granted Dec. 
8, 1919. 

4. Petition of Frank P. Knight and George L. Knight for license to 

build a portion of a building over Manchester Harbor near Cen- 
tral Street, Manchester. Granted Dec. 26, 1919. 

5. Petition of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston for 

license to lay three cables in Neponset River at the temporary 
Neponset bridge, so called, Boston and Quincy. Granted Dec. 
29, 1919. 

6. Petition of the Newburyport Gas and Electric Company for license 

to lay and maintain lines for the transmission of electricity over 

Glen Mills Creek, a tributary of Parker River, Newbury. Granted 

Dec. 29, 1919. 
Petition of the P. S. Huckins Company for license to build a pile 

and timber structure and a marine railway in Boston Harbor at 

East Boston. Granted Dec. 29, 1919. 
Petition of the Merrimac Chemical Company for license to build a 

pile trestle on Mystic River, Everett. Granted Jan. 9, 1920. 
Petition of the Merrimac Chemical Company for license to build 

pile and timber bulkheads and sod dikes, fill solid, and maintain 



36 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

filling already done, in Mystic River, Everett. Granted Jan. 9, 
1920. 

10. Petition of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston and 

the Weymouth Light and Power Company for license to lay cables 
in Weymouth Fore River at and near Weymouth Fore River bridge, 
Quincy and Weymouth. Granted Jan. 23, 1920. 

11. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to build sea walls and pile platforms, to rebuild portions 
of the existing wall, to drive fender piles and dredge in Roxbury 
Canal, Boston. Granted Jan. 26, 1920. 

12. Petition of the United States Rubber Company, American Plant, 

for license to drive piles in Broad Canal, Cambridge, for the foun- 
dation of a portion of a transformer and switch house. Granted 
Jan. 26, 1920. 

13. Petition of the county commissioners of Hampden County for ap- 

proval of plans for the construction cf a bridge across Connecticut 
River in Springfield and West Springfield, as authorized by chapter 
252 of the General Acts of 1915. Granted Jan. 29, 1920. 

14. Petition of the Charles River Amusement Company for license to 

build and maintain temporarily, for mooring purposes, four pile 
dolphins in Fort Point Channel, Boston. Granted Feb. 9, 1920. 

15. Petition of the Beacon Oil Company for license to build a pile wharf 

and pile dolphins in Mystic River, Everett. Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

16. Petition of the Cohasset Narrows Bridge Commission for approval 

of plans for the construction of a new bridge across Cohasset Nar- 
rows in Wareham and Bourne, as authorized by chapter 165 of the 
General Acts of 1918. Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

17. Petition of the city of Beverly for license to fill solid and build a 

stone culvert at and near West Federal Street and Bass River 
Street in Bass River, Beverly. Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

18. Petition of the Newburyport Gas and Electric Company for license 

to build a pile platform and four pile dolphins on Merrimack River, 
Newburyport. Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

19. Petition of the town of Harwich, by its board of selectmen, for license 

to build a reinforced concrete culvert at the head of Aliens Har- 
bor, Harwich. Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

20. Petition of the Boston Molasses Company for license to fill solid in 

Boston Harbor near the Reserved Channel at South Boston. 
Granted March 3, 1920. 

21. Petition of Thomas Taggart for license to build a pile pier and float 

stage in Hyannis Harbor at Hyannisport, Barnstable. Granted 
March 9, 1920. 

22. Petition of the Marine Biological Laboratory for license to build a 

pile platform and float stage in Eel Pond at Woods Hole, Falmouth. 
Granted March 9, 1920. 

23. Petition of the Merrimac Chemical Company for license to build a 



WATERWAYS. 37 

Nos. 

bulkhead and pile trestle and fill solid on Mystic River, Everett. 
Granted March 9, 1920. 

24. Petition of Daisy M. Headley for license to build a foot bridge, on 
piles, with a draw therein, across Little Bay between the mainland 
and Nantucket Island, Fairhaven. Granted March 22, 1920. 

25. Petition of the Simpson's Patent Dry Dock Company for license to 
build a pile wharf, to remove two existing piers and to dredge in 
Boston Harbor at East Boston. Granted March 26, 1920. 

26. Petition of the New England Oil Refining Company for license to 
build a pile wharf, a pile trestle and four pile dolphins in Taunton 
River, Fall River. Granted March 26, 1920. 

27. Petition of Elizabeth W. Baxter for license to build a wharf in Lewis 
Bay at Hyannis, Barnstable. Granted March 26, 1920. 

28. Petition of the Boston Molasses Company for license to fill solid in 
tidewater at and near the junction of Farragut Road and East 
First Street and near the Reserved Channel at South Boston. 
Granted April 2, 1920. 

29. Petition of Mary T. Shumway, Ethel N. Shumway and Harold H. 
Shumway, heirs of Nelson Shumway, for license to build a pile and 
timber bulkhead and fill solid on Fort Point Channel, Boston. 
Granted April 2, 1920. 

30. Petition of the county commissioners of Dukes County for approval 
of plans for the construction of a bridge over the outlet of Lagoon 
Pond in Oak Bluffs and Tisbury, as authorized by chapter 89 of 
the Acts of 1920. Granted April 2, 1920. 

31. Petition of the New Bedford Gas and Edison Light Company for 
license to extend its wharf on Acushnet River, New Bedford, by 
building sea walls and filling solid. Granted April 5, 1920. 

32. Petition of the Beacon Oil Company for license to build a portion of 
a pump house, to fill solid, lay a suction pipe and construct a 
wooden strainer box on Island End River, Everett. Granted 
April 5, 1920. 

33. Petition of the Quincy Market Cold Storage and Warehouse Com- 
pany for license to build and maintain a pile structure in Boston 

f Harbor in and over a part of a dock at Constitution Wharf, Boston. 

Granted April 23, 1920. 
34. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 
Railroad Company, lessee, for license to modify the location of the 
fender lines for the 70-foot width of channel in connection with the 
construction of a new bridge across Chelsea Creek, Boston and 
Chelsea, and to construct dolphins. Granted April 23, 1920. 

35. Petition of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., for license 
to fill solid in Bents Creek at its Fore River Plant, Quincy. 
Granted April 23, 1920. 

36. Petition of Thomas E. Reed for license to build a pile structure in 
Gloucester Harbor, Gloucester. Granted May 10, 1920. 



38 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

37. Petition of the Richard T. Green Company for license to build a pile 

wharf and bulkhead and dredge in Chelsea Creek, Chelsea. 
Granted May 10, 1920. 

38. Petition of the American Printing Company for license to build a 

sea wall, extend a sewer and fill solid in a dock in Fall River Har- 
bor, Fall River. Granted May 10, 1920. 

39. Petition of Edith M. Kingsbury for license to build a marine railway, 

pile wharf and dike, to construct dolphins, fill solid and dredge in 
Neponset River, Quincy. Granted May 11, 1920. 

40. Petition of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., for license 

to build a floating dry dock, including a culvert, bulkhead, moor- 
ing pier and marginal wharf, to fill solid and dredge in Haywards 
Creek and Weymouth Fore River, in Quincy, Weymouth and 
Braintree. Granted May 12, 1920. 

41. Petition of the Norton Company for license to locate two float stages 

in Lake Quinsigamond, Worcester. Granted May 17, 1920. 

43. Petition of Henry A. Morss for license to build a wharf, locate a 

float stage and place riprap in Marblehead Harbor at Marblehead 
Neck, Marblehead. Granted May 21, 1920. 

44. Petition of the Fall River Electric Light Company for license to 

build a pile pier and five pile dolphins in Taunton River, Fall 
River. Granted June 28, 1920. 

45. Petition of the Western Union Telegraph Company of New York for 

license to lay approximately 1,000 feet of submarine cable in Mystic 
River near the Boston & Maine Railroad drawbridge No. 8, Somer- 
ville and Medford. Granted May 25, 1920. 

46. Petition of Beryl Keith Kane for license to build a wharf, supported 

by stone piers, in Marion Harbor, Marion. Granted May 28, 1920. 

47. Petition of James M. Codman for license to build a pile wharf and 

locate a float stage in Buzzards Bay, Wareham. Granted June 1, 
1920. 

48. Petition of George T. Rice, John K. Burgess and Philip Spalding, 

trustees of the Tisbury Pond Club, for license to excavate a ditch 
connecting Long Cove and Tisbury Great Pond, West Tisbury. 
Granted June 4, 1920. 

49. Petition of the United Electric Light Company for license to con- 

struct a new concrete intake, to replace the present intake, beyond 
the river line established by chapter 301 of the Acts of 1893, on 
Connecticut River, Springfield. Granted June 4, 1920. 

50. Petition of the Standard Oil Company of New York, New England 

Department, for license to remove a portion of an existing wall, 
to build a new wall and wooden platform, to drive fender piles, to 
fill solid and to dredge in Chelsea Creek, East Boston. Granted 
June 4, 1920. 

51. Petition of the Massachusetts Oil Refining Company for license to 

build a temporary pile pier and dolphins in Haywards Creek, 
Braintree. Granted June 21, 1920. 



WATERWAYS. 39 

Nos. 

52. Petition of the Pocahontas Fuel Company, Incorporated, for license 

to drive piles within the lines of its present wharf in Acushnet 
River, New Bedford. Granted June 21, 1920. 

53. Petition of the Beacon Oil Company for license to build an addition 

to its wharf, on piles, to construct a pile dolphin and drive addi- 
tional piles at its present wharf on Mystic River, Everett. Granted 
June 21, 1920. 

54. Petition of the Winthrop Highlands Association for license to build 

a pile pier, wooden steps and a diving platform in Broad Sound, 
Winthrop. Granted June 23, 1920. 

55. Petition of Horace L. Norris for license to build two pile wharves and 

two float stages in Plymouth Harbor at Saquish Head and Saquish 
Beach, respectively, in Plymouth. Granted June 28, 1920. 

56. Petition of the Winnisimmet Ship Yard, Incorporated, for license to 

build two pile wharves and to remove old structures in Chelsea 
Creek, Chelsea. Granted June 28, 1920. 

57. Petition of the town of Marion, by its board of selectmen, for license 

to remove portions of existing sea walls, to build new sea walls and 
a bridge, and to excavate, at and near South Wharf, so called, in 
Marion Harbor, Marion. Granted June 28, 1920. 

58. Petition of the New England Oil Refining Company for license to 

build a pile dolphin in Taunton River, Fall River. Granted June 
28, 1920. 

59. Petition of the Old Colony Railroad Company for license to widen 

its pier, on piles, on Acushnet River, New Bedford. Granted 
June 28, 1920. 

60. Petition of the Fairhaven Mills for license to build a bulkhead and 

fill solid in Acushnet River above Coggeshall Street bridge, Fair- 
haven. Granted June 28, 1920. 

61. Petition of the Southern Massachusetts Telephone Company for 

license to lay a submarine cable in Pocasset Harbor from Wings 
Neck to Bassetts Island, Bourne. Granted July 6, 1920. 

62. Petition of the New England Oil Refining Company for license to 

widen its trestle and build additions to its wharf, on piles, in Taun- 
ton River, Fall River. Granted July 9, 1920. 

63. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to rebuild its rail- 

road bridge No. 32 on Bass River, Beverly and Salem. Granted 
July 16, 1920. 

64. Petition of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston 

for license to lay cables under the tidewaters of a canal flowing 
into Town River Bay, Quincy. Granted July 16, 1920. 

65. Petition of John F. Connor for license to build a pile wharf in Man- 

chester Harbor, Manchester. Granted July 19, 1920. 

66. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to drive addi- 

tional piles at its Mystic Docks on the north channel of Mystic 
River, Boston. Granted July 19, 1920. 

67. Petition of the Fairhaven Mills for license to build a pile and timber 



40 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

bulkhead and fill solid on Acushnet River, adjoining Coggeshall 
Street bridge, New Bedford. Granted July 19, 1920. 

68. Petition of Joseph P. Sousa for license to build a pile pier in Province- 

town Harbor, Provincetown. Granted July 23, 1920. 

69. Petition of the Metropolitan District Commission for license to 

build a dam and gate in Blacks Creek at Blacks Creek bridge, 
Quincy. Granted Aug. 2, 1920. 

70. Petition of Henry B. Day for license to build a pile pier in West Bay 

at Wianno, Barnstable. Granted Aug. 2, 1920. 

71. Petition of H. P. Converse & Co. for license to build and maintain 

temporarily a pile and timber railroad trestle in Connecticut River, 
Springfield. Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 

72. Petition of the New England Oil Refining Company for license to 

build a bulkhead and fill solid in Taunton River, Fall River. 
Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 

73. Petition of the Boston Ice Company for license to reconstruct its 

dam, and maintain the same, at the outlet of Morse's Pond, Welles- 
ley. Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 

74. Petition of the Simpson's Patent Dry Dock Company for license to 

extend its wharf, on piles, and to dredge in Boston Harbor at East 
Boston. Granted Aug. 26, 1920. 

75. Petition of the Commissioners for Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

for license to drive piles in Charles River at Brookline Street bridge, 
Boston and Cambridge. Granted Sept. 20, 1920. 

76. Petition of Felton Bent for license to build a sea wall and fill solid 

in Stage Cove, Gloucester. Granted Sept. 20, 1920. 

77. Petition of the board of trustees of the Boston Elevated Railway 

Company for license to dump snow and ice into the tidewaters of 
Boston Harbor. Granted Sept. 24, 1920. 

78. Petition of the Boston Consolidated Gas Company for approval of 

plans for laying and maintaining conduits and pipes and doing 
other work in Mystic River near Maiden bridge, Boston, as au- 
thorized by chapter 537 of the Acts of 1896. Granted Sept. 
27, 1920. * 

79. Petition of the Standard Oil Company for license to build a pile 

wharf and four pile dolphins in Mount Hope Bay, Fall River. 
Granted Sept. 28, 1920. 

80. Petition of Reuben Bigelow for license to build a pile and timber 

bulkhead, a marine railway and wharf, and to fill solid in Little 
Bay at Monument Beach, Bourne. Granted Sept. 28, 1920. 

81. Petition of George S. Baldwin, William B. H. Dowse and George N. 

Talbot for license to build an earth dike, and a tide gate, in tide- 
water at the entrance to Phinney Bay at Osterville, Barnstable. 
Granted Sept. 28, 1920. 

82. Petition of the Marine Biological Laboratory for license to build a 

sea wall, to fill solid and maintain a float stage in Eel Pond at 
Woods Hole, Falmouth. Granted Oct. 11, 1920. 




WATERWAYS. 41 

Nos. 

83. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to dump snow and ice into the tidewaters of Boston 
Harbor. Granted Oct. 11, 1920. 

84. Petition of Francesco Gardella for license to build a concrete river 

wall and fill solid in Merrimack River, Haverhill. Granted Oct. 
15, 1920. 

85. Petition of Antonio S. Gardella for license to build a concrete river 

wall and fill solid in Merrimack River, Haverhill. Granted Oct. 
15, 1920. 

86. Petition of the Metropolitan Coal Company for license to fill solid 

in Mystic River easterly of and near Chelsea bridge, Chelsea. 
Granted Oct. 15, 1920. 

87. Petition of the Metropolitan Coal Company for license to remove 

material and rebuild a portion of its sea wall in a dock adjoining 
Mystic River, Chelsea. Granted Oct. 15, 1920. 

88. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to lay a cast-iron pipe overflow in Old Harbor, near the 
southerly end of K Street, and near the southerly end of N Street, 
South Boston. Granted Oct. 22, 1920. 

89. Petition of the New England Power Company for license to erect 

and maintain a steel tower and string wires in and across Crystal 
Lake, Gardner. Granted Oct. 22, 1920. 

90. Petition of the Southeastern Massachusetts Power and Electric Com- 

pany for license to stretch wires or cables for a transmission line 
over Agawam River, Wareham. Granted Oct. 22, 1920. 

91. Petition of the city of Beverly for license to fill solid and build a 

riprap slope in a dock in Beverly Harbor, known as "Old Ferry 
Way," Beverly. Granted Oct. 22, 1920. 

92. Petition of Arthur Henry Lamborn for license to build a cement con- 

crete wharf in Vineyard Haven Harbor, Tisbury. Granted Oct. 
26, 1920. 

93. Petition of the Bay State Freezer, Incorporated, for license to build 

a pile wharf in Yarmouthport Harbor, Yarmouth. Granted Nov. 
5, 1920. 

94. Petition of Richard M. Winfield for license to build a pile and timber 

bulkhead in West Bay at Osterville, Barnstable. Granted Nov. 
12, 1920. 

95. Petition of Frederick E. Pierce for license to build a pile and timber 

launch way on Mystic River, Somerville. Granted Nov. 17, 1920. 

96. Petition of Richard T. Crane, Jr., for license to build and maintain 

pile and timber bulkheads, a pile pier and float, and to fill solid on 
Castle Neck River, Ipswich. Granted Nov. 26, 1920. 

Miscellaneous Permits granted during the Year. 
Boston & Maine Railkoad, to dredge berth between Piers 42 and 43 
of Hoosac Tunnel docks, Boston. Granted Dec. 5, 1919. 



42 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Merrimac Chemical Company, to dredge berth at its wharf in Everett. 
Granted Dec. 5, 1919. 

Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Company, to publish notice 
that Saugus River will be closed by the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad Company to the passage of vessels through the Saugus River 
drawbridge, for the purpose of making necessary repairs to said bridge. 
Granted Dec. 23, 1919. 

Kearns Construction Company, to use for storage purposes certain 
land at South Boston. Granted Dec. 26, 1919. 

Boston Merchant Marine Scaling Company, to dump ashes at re- 
ceiving basins at East Boston and South Boston. Granted Dec. 30, 
1919. 

New England Oil Refining Company, by the Aberthaw Construc- 
tion Company, Agents, to dredge in front of its wharf in Taunton 
River, Fall River. Granted Jan. 2, 1920. 

Isaac Blair & Co., Incorporated, to dump snow into tidewater from 
Dover Street bridge, Boston. Granted Jan. 26, 1920. 

Boston Dredging Company, to deposit dredged material at receiving 
basins at East Boston and South Boston. Granted Jan. 1, 1920. 

J. S. Packard Dredging Company, to deposit dredged material at re- 
ceiving basins at East Boston and South Boston. Granted Jan. 1, 
1920. 

Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company, to deposit dredged 
material at receiving basins at East Boston and South Boston. Granted 
Jan. 1, 1920. 

The Baldwin Shipping Company, Incorporated, to use and occupy 
the trolley freight station and terminal at South Boston. Granted 
Jan. 23, 1920. 

The Western Union Telegraph Company, to occupy a room at Com- 
monwealth Pier No. 5, South Boston. Granted Feb. 9, 1920. 

Betts Brothers & Co., to break up a lighter and deposit material on 
filled land of the Commonwealth near Jeffries Point, East Boston. 
Granted Feb. 13, 1920. 

The Irving Usen Company, to use and occupy building known as 
"Bosun's Locker" on Northern Avenue, South Boston. Granted 
Feb. 13, 1920. 

Frederic D. Fisk, Daniel R. Sortwell and Theodore Hoague, 
Trustees, to dredge material from their flats in Charles River Basin 
on Cambridge side of the channel and southerly of Cambridge bridge. 
Granted Feb. 20, 1920. 

Arnold Scott, acting in Behalf of the Summer Residents of the 
Town of Dartmouth, to dredge basin on the northerly side of the 
wharf at Salters Point, Dartmouth. Granted March 12, 1920. 

City of Boston, by its Public Works Department, to lay water 
pipes in certain streets on the Commonwealth flats at South Boston. 
Granted March 26, 1920. 



WATERWAYS. 43 

New Bedford Gas and Edison Light Company, to dredge in Acushnet 

River at its wharf at the foot of Coffin Street, New Bedford. Granted 

April 5, 1920. 
Boston Elevated Railway Company, to dredge berth at outer end of 

wharf at its power station in South Boston. Granted April 12, 1920. 
R. C. Grovestine, to remove sand and gravel from Nahant Beach in 

front of property of estate of Francis H. Johnson. Granted April 26, 

1920. 
Marine Scaling Company of New England, to deposit ashes at the 

receiving basins at East Boston and South Boston. Granted April 

26, 1920. 
Burton-Furber Coal Company, to dredge berth in front of its wharf 

at East Boston. Granted April 28, 1920. 
Boston Wool and Merchandise Stores, Incorporated, to lay and 

operate railroad tracks across Fargo Street, South Boston. Granted 

May 3, 1920. 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., to excavate earth from 

the Commonwealth's property at Haywards Creek. Granted May 6, 

1920. 
City of Boston, by its Public Works Department, to lay a 12-inch 

pipe in D Street from Fargo Street, South Boston. Granted May 

10, 1920. 
Selectmen of Town of Hull, to take gravel from beach lying between 

the new supply pier of the Nantasket Beach Steamboat Company and 

the Hull Yacht Club Pier, Hull. Granted May 12, 1920. 
William M. Bailey Company, to occupy lot of land at South Boston. 

Granted May 17, 1920. 
City of Boston, by its Public Works Department, to redredge berth 

at its Fort Hill dumping station on Atlantic Avenue at the foot of 

Oliver Street, Boston. Granted May 28, 1920. 
John H. Driscoll, Jr., to use and occupy Berry Island in Lake Winthrop, 

Holliston. Granted June 1, 1920. 
City Fuel Company of Boston, to dredge at its wharf at East Boston. 

Granted June 4, 1920. 
City Fuel Company of Boston, to dredge at its wharf on Neponset 

River, Milton. Granted June 4, 1920. 
Boston & Maine Railroad, to publish notice that Mystic River will be 

closed by the Boston & Maine Railroad to the passage of vessels through 

the draw in its bridge on its Western Division, for the purpose of in- 
stalling steel trusses in place of the present wooden ones. Granted 

June 15, 1920. 
Atlantic Works, to dredge a trench alongside their railway No. 3 at 

East Boston. Granted June 18, 1920. 
Joseph Burnett Company, assenting to the construction of five pro- 
jections from the front wall of the building being constructed on the 

easterly side of D Street, South Boston. Granted June 24, 1920. 



44 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

New England Oil Refining Company, to dredge near its wharf and 

trestle in Taunton River, Fall River. Granted July 9, 1920. 
Town of Ipswich, by its Health Department, to deposit clam shells 

in a cove adjacent to the town wharf on Ipswich River, Ipswich. 

Granted July 9, 1920. 
City of Fall River, to redredge at and near the wharf of the Bowen- 

ville Coal Company in Mount Hope Bay, Fall River. Granted July 

23, 1920. 
George T. Rendle Company, to dredge the berth on the westerly side 

of its wharf at East Boston. Granted July 29, 1920. 
William B. Emery, State Quartermaster, to deposit gravel at the foot 

of Depot Street in Plymouth Harbor, Plymouth. Granted Aug. 2, 1920. 
City of Fall River, to dredge in Taunton River at Central Street Creek, 

Fall River. Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 
City of Fall River, to dredge in Taunton River at and near the city 

wharf, Fall River. Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 
Boston Sand and Gravel Company, to dredge material at the mouth 

of Merrimack River and Ipswich River and in Annisquam River. 

Granted Aug. 5, 1920. 
Frank A. Andrews, to remove gravel from the beach on and in front of 

his property on Phillips Road, Nahant. Granted Aug. 20, 1920. 
Joseph Burnett & Co., to lay pipes in Fargo Street, South Boston. 

Granted Sept. 1, 1920. 
Richard T. Green Company, to dredge at its marine railways, East 

Boston. Granted Sept. 7, 1920. 
Boston Dredging Company, to deposit in Boston Harbor, northerly of 

Governor's Island, material dredged from Weymouth Fore River. 

Granted Sept. 16, 1920. 
Frank C. Taylor, to dredge material from Lagoon Pond and Vineyard 

Haven Harbor, Tisbury and Oak Bluffs. Granted Sept. 16, 1920. 
Board of Trustees of the Boston Elevated Railway, to dump snow 

and ice. upon a portion of the Commonwealth flats at South Boston. 

Granted Sept. 24, 1920. 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., to build a temporary 

fence across property of the Commonwealth at Haywards Creek, Quincy 

and Braintree. Granted Oct. 11, 1920. 
City of Boston, to dredge in Old Harbor at the outer ends of sewers 

leading from Kemp, Vale, H, K and N streets, South Boston. Granted 

Oct. 22, 1920. 
City of Beverly, to dredge an area in Beverly Harbor. Granted Oct. 

22, 1920. 
Boston Scaling and Bilge Cleaning Company, to deposit material at 

the receiving basin at Jeffries Point, East Boston. Granted Oct. 22, 

1920. 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, to dredge an area 

in Weymouth Fore River, Quincy. Granted Oct. 29, 1920. 
Swampscott Masonic Building Associates, Incorporated, to remove 



WATERWAYS. 45 

boulders from beach in front of their property at Swampscott. Granted 
Nov. 12, 1920. 
Public Works Department, Division of Highways, to occupy an 
area under the viaduct extending from Summer Street to Common- 
wealth Pier No. 5, South Boston. Granted Nov. 22, 1920. 

Fish Weir Permits approved during the Year. 

Thomas M. Douthart. Permit issued by selectmen of Falmouth Dec. 
1, 1919, to maintain and operate a fish trap in Buzzards Bay, Fal- 
mouth. Approved Dec. 5, 1919. 

William E. Taylor. Permit issued by selectmen of Falmouth Dec. 1, 
1919, to maintain and operate a fish trap in Buzzards Bay, Falmouth. 
Approved Dec. 5, 1919. 

Edmund G. Howes. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Dec. 1, 
1919, to construct, maintain and operate a fish weir in Chatham South 
Bay, Chatham. Approved Dec. 12, 1919. 

Frank K. Freeman. Permit issued by selectmen of Orleans Oct. 
10, 1919, to erect and maintain an eel fyke in the creek connecting 
Little Cove, so called, with Mill Pond, so called, in East Orleans. Ap- 
proved Dec. 12, 1919. 

Obed S. Dagget. Permit issued by selectmen of West Tisbury Dec. 10, 
1919, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Vineyard Sound, West 
Tisbury. Approved Jan. 2, 1920. 

David T. Butler. Permit issued by selectmen of Chilmark Dec. 9, 
1919, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Vineyard Sound, Chil- 
mark. Approved Jan. 9, 1920. 

Ernest C. Mayhew. Permit issued by selectmen of Chilmark Dec. 9, 

1919, to construct and maintain a fish weir in the tidewaters of Chil- 
mark. Approved Jan. 9, 1920. 

Daniel H. Nickerson. Permit issued by selectmen of Dennis Jan. 30, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Nantucket Sound, Dennis. 
Approved Feb. 9, 1920. 

George A. Finney. Permit issued by selectmen of Plymouth Feb. 2, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Cape Cod Bay, Plymouth. 

Approved Feb. 9, 1920. 
Frederick A. Pease. Permit issued by selectmen of Fairhaven Feb. 2, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Buzzards Bay, Fairhaven. 

Approved Feb. 13, 1920. 
Monomoy Weir and Fish Company. Permit issued by selectmen of 

Chatham Jan. 10, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in 

Chatham Bay, Chatham. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 
Roscoe H. Gould. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Jan. 10, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham Bay, Chatham. 

Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 
George C. Parker. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Jan. 10, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in the northeast part of South 

Bay, Chatham. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 



46 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Benjamin R. Baker. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Jan. 16, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Pleasant Bay, Chatham. 
Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Elmer F. Mayo. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Jan. 21, 1920, 
to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham South Bay, Chatham. 
Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Benjamin F. Rich. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Jan. 21, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir off Kidder's Point, Chat- 
ham. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Benjamin L. Jones. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Feb. 16, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham South Bay, 
Chatham. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Benjamin L. Jones. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Feb. 16, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham South Bay, 
Chatham. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

David N. Kelley. Permit issued by selectmen of Fairhaven Feb. 9, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Buzzards Bay, Fair- 
haven. Approved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Sven Hanson. Permit issued by Municipal Council of Gloucester Jan. 
28, 1920, to locate a fish trap in the tidewaters of Gloucester. Ap- 
proved Feb. 20, 1920. 

Robert P. Nokel. Permit issued by selectmen of Sandwich Feb. 21, 
1920, to construct and operate a fish weir or weirs in Cape Cod Bay, 
Sandwich. Approved March 3, 1920. 

Clarington E. Eldredge. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham 
March 15, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham 
South Bay, Chatham. Approved March 22, 1920. 

James C. Kelley. Permit issued by selectmen of Dennis March 15, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Nantucket Sound, 
Dennis. Approved March 22, 1920. 

Eldredge Woodbury. Permit issued by municipal council of Glouces- 
ter, March 17, 1920, to maintain a fish trap at Plum Cove, Gloucester. 
Approved March 26, 1920. 

Simon Berrio. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet March 13, 1920, 
to construct and maintain a fish weir in Cape Cod Bay, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved April 2, 1920. 

John W. Stubbs. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet March 13, 
1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Cape Cod Bay, Wellfleet. 
Approved April 2, 1920. 

Frank Keezer. Permit issued by selectmen of Nahant March 22, 1920, 
to construct and maintain a fish weir off Bass Point, Nahant. Ap- 
proved April 5, 1920. 

Aaron Kelley. Permit issued by selectmen of Dennis March 29, 1920, 
to construct and maintain a fish weir in Nantucket Sound, Dennis. 
Approved April 5, 1920. 



WATERWAYS. 47 

Otis B. Luce. Permit issued by selectmen of Gosnold March 20, 1920, 

to construct a fish trap in Vineyard Sound, Gosnold. Approved April 

5, 1920. 
George C. Parker. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham April 5, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir on the north side of South 

Bay, Chatham. Approved April 9, 1920. 
Benjamin L. Jones. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham March 

31, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Chatham South Bay, 

Chatham. Approved April 9, 1920. 
L. Pickert Fish Company. Permit issued by selectmen of Plymouth 

March 31, 1920, for location of fish weir in Saquish Cove, Plymouth. 

Approved April 9, 1920. 
Samuel M. Kehoe. Permit issued by selectmen of Swampscott April 

2, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish trap in Swampscott Bay, 

Swampscott. Approved April 12, 1920. 
Heath Brothers. Permit issued by the selectmen of Manchester April 

13, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in the tidewaters of 

Manchester. Approved April 28, 1920. 
Norman Benson. Permit issued by selectmen of West Tisbury April 

17, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Vineyard Sound, West 

Tisbury. Approved April 28, 1920. 
Edwin P. Cook. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet April 24, 1920, 

to construct and maintain a fish weir in the tidewaters of Wellfleet. 

Approved April 28, 1920. 
Joseph C. Forend. Permit issued by selectmen of Mattapoisett April 

30, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish trap in Buzzards Bay, Matta- 
poisett. Approved May 6, 1920. 
Thaddeus F. Ellis. Permit issued by selectmen of Orleans May 1, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Cape Cod Bay, Orleans. 

Approved May 6, 1920. 
Joseph B. Goulart. Permit issued by selectmen of Fairhaven May 3, 

1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in Little Bay, Fairhaven. 

Approved May 17, 1920. 
Shirley E. Nickerson. Permit issued by selectmen of Nantucket April 

16, 1920, to construct and maintain a fish weir in tidewaters of Nan- 
tucket. Approved June 18, 1920. 
William M. Kendrick. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham June 

9, 1920, to set and maintain a fyke for eels in a creek above the dike 

extending from Samuel Ryder's Island, Chatham. Approved July 18, 

1920. 
H. L. Peaks. Permit issued by selectmen of Gosnold June 25, 1920, to 

construct and maintain a fish trap in Buzzards Bay, Gosnold. Ap- 
proved July 12, 1920. 
Eugene B. Ellis. Permit issued by selectmen of Brewster July 3, 1920, to 

place two fish traps in Mill Creek, Brewster. Approved July 12, 1920. 



48 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

David E. Curran. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet July 10, 1920, 
to erect and maintain two eel fykes below Herring River dike, Well- 
fleet. Approved July 16, 1920. 
Edwin P. Cook. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet July 10, 1920, 
to erect and maintain two eel fykes in Duck Creek, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved July 16, 1920. 
Frank A. Williams. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet July 10, 
1920, to erect and maintain two fykes below Herring River dike, Well- 
fleet. Approved July 16, 1920. 
F. Thomas Ellis. Permit issued by selectmen of Brewster Aug. 13, 
1920, to place two fish traps in Mill Creek, Brewster. Approved Aug. 
17, 1920. 
Bay State Freezer, Incorporated. Permit issued by selectmen of 
Yarmouth June 16, 1920, to set and maintain a fish weir on the north 
shore of Yarmouth. Approved Sept. 10, 1920. 
Bay State Freezer, Incorporated. Permit issued by selectmen of 
Yarmouth June 16, 1920, to set and maintain a fish weir on the north 
shore of Yarmouth. Approved Sept. 10, 1920. 
Frederick Young. Permit issued by selectmen of Brewster Sept. 4, 
1920, to place a fish trap in Quivet Creek, Brewster. Approved Sept. 
10, 1920. 
Frederick Young. Permit issued by selectmen of Brewster Sept. 4, 
1920, to place a fish trap in Mill Creek, Brewster. Approved Sept. 10, 
1920. 
Orick D. Young. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham Sept. 2, 1920, 
to maintain and fish a fyke for eels in Henry Harding's Creek, Chatham. 
Approved Sept. 10, 1920. 
Charles W. Snow. Permit issued by selectmen of Truro Sept. 4, 1920, to 
construct eel fykes in Pamet River, Truro. Approved Sept. 13, 1920. 
James Y. Gill. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet Sept. 11, 1920, 
to erect and maintain eel fykes in Silver Spring Creek, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved Sept. 24, 1920. 
Maurice E. Maker. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet Sept. 11, 
1920, to erect and maintain an eel fyke in Duck Creek, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved Sept. 24, 1920. 
Bert W. Bell. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet Sept. 11, 1920, 
to erect and maintain an eel fyke in Blackfish Creek, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved Sept. 24, 1920. 
Clarence M. Lombard. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet Sept. 
20, 1920, to erect and maintain an eel fyke in Duck Creek, Wellfleet. 
Approved Sept. 24, 1920. 
Timothy W. Black. Permit issued by selectmen of Brewster Sept. 13, 
1920, to place a fish trap and an eel fyke near Mill Creek, Brewster. 
Approved Sept. 24, 1920. 
Frederick E. E. Johnson. Permit issued by selectmen of Chatham 
Sept. 22, 1920, to maintain an eel fyke in Smiths Dyke Creek, Chatham. 
Approved Sept. 27, 1920. 



WATERWAYS. 49 

Sherman Fisher. Permit issued by selectmen of Wellfleet Sept. 25, 
1920, to erect and maintain an eel fyke in Duck Creek, Wellfleet. Ap- 
proved Sept. 28, 1920. 

-Frederick Thacher. Permit issued by selectmen of Yarmouth Oct. 28, 
1920, to erect and maintain two fish weirs in Nantucket Sound, Yar- 
mouth. Approved Nov. 5, 1920. 

Arthur S. Weeks. Permit issued by selectmen of Falmouth Nov. 1, 
1920, to place a fish trap in Buzzards Bay, Falmouth. Approved Nov. 
5, 1920. 

Frederick Thacher. Permit issued by selectmen of Yarmouth Nov. 23, 
1920, to erect and maintain a double fish weir in Nantucket Sound, 
Yarmouth. Approved Nov. 29, 1920. 



50 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 

The policy of developing and improving the water front of 
Boston Harbor, from the viewpoint of anticipating the con- 
stantly increasing needs of facilities for commerce, manufactur- 
ing and other business, should be continued. Expenditures for 
most of the important projects are provided for in the recom- 
mendations for consideration in the Governor's budget. They 
include continued expenditures for dredging and filling in East 
Boston and South Boston, construction of piers, bulkheads, 
roadways and railroad connections upon the land already de- 
veloped at these points, and also at Hay wards Creek in Quincy 
and Braintree. 

Such other demands as are made necessary by projects al- 
ready established, requiring funds for maintenance and further 
development, are also included in recommendations that have 
been submitted for the Governor's budget. 

Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor. 

14. In determining the location of bulkheads, and other works 
in connection with the development of the property of the Com- 
monwealth in Boston Harbor, it is necessary to change and 
establish certain harbor lines in East Boston and in South Bay. 

15. Construction along the banks of important rivers in the 
Commonwealth requires the approval of the Division of Water- 
ways and Public Lands in many cases where the river line is 
not already definitely fixed. In order that there may be estab- 
lished a line which shall result in properly protecting the flow of 
water, as well as preserving a uniform river front, it is im- 
portant that definite lines should be fixed. The Division recom- 
mends such a line for a portion of the Merrimack River at 
Haverhill. 



WATERWAYS. 51 



Conservation of Water Resources. 

The Division of Waterways and Public Lands and its prede- 
cessors have in past years given considerable study and made 
extended investigations relative to the conservation, develop- 
ment and utilization of the water resources of the Common- 
wealth. These studies culminated in recommendations for legis- 
lation which were submitted in 1920. This bill was carefully 
considered, and in its amended form, as House Bill No. 1475, 
was referred to the General Court of 1921. It is recommended 
that this bill be reconsidered. 



52 



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56 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



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58 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



o 







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59 



CO 

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WATERWAYS. 



63 



Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for Improve- 
ment of Small Harbors and Channels within Boston Har- 
bor, UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands, and its Predeces- 
sors, from 1893 to 1920, inclusive. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Cottage Park Channel, Win- 

throp. 
Dorchester, easterly shore, Bos- 


Dredging . 


$9,525 92 


- 


$9,504 58 


Dredging . 




70,363 66 


- 


70,171 31 


Harbor View, Boston 


Dredging . 




10,146 00 


- 


146 00 


Hingham Harbor 


Dredging . 




13,180 69 


$3,000 00 


16,180 69 


Houghs Neck Channel, Quincy 


Dredging . 




26,952 54 


1,500 00 


28,452 54 


Island End River, Everett 


Survey 




264 10 


- 


264 10 


Jeffries Point Channel 


Dredging . 




12,961 90 


- 


2,961 90 


Mystic River (near Lawrence 

and Wiggin's Wharf) . 
Neponset River 


Dredging . 
Dredging . 




5,927 70 
44,152 59 


- 


5,927 70 
44,151 85 


Orient Heights Channel . 


Dredging . 




43,446 15 


- 


43,090 67 


Pleasant Park Yacht Club 

Channel. 
Point Shirley .... 


Dredging . 
Dredging . 




3,154 92 
1,986 53 


~" 


3,154 92 
1,986 53 


Shirley Gut, Boston and Win- 

throp. 
South Boston, southerly shore 


Dredging . 




1,906 20 


- 


1,906 20 


Dredging . 




126,972 48 


- 


126,972 44 


Stony Beach, Hull . 


Sea wall 




11,607 90 


- 


11,335 07 


Weir River, Hull 


Dredging . 




99,580 10 


25,000 00 


124,580 10 


Wessagussett Channel 


Dredging . 




815 20 


- 


815 20 


Weymouth Fore River 


Dredging . 




46,838 34 


- 


31,913 85 


Winthrop Harbor Channels 


Dredging . 




27,962 02 


1,000 00 


26,707 44 


Wollaston Channel . 


Dredging . 




34,309 77 


- 


33,888 38 


Totals .... 


$592,054 71 


$30,500 00 


$584,111 47 



Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor Work 
from Dec. 1, 1919, to Nov. 30, 1920, under Chapter 481, Acts of 
1909. 



Location. 


Character of Work. 


Contribu- 
tions. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Acushnet River .... 
Bass River, Yarmouth 
Brant Rock, Marshfield . 


Dredging .... 
Filling basin .... 
Spur jetties .... 


- 


$75,960 27 
2,547 35 
3,138 74 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contributions, etc. — Concluded. 



Location. 


Character of Work. 


Contribu- 
tions. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Cohasset Harbor .... 


Survey 


- 


$298 19 


Connecticut River, Hoi yoke . 


Marking and lighting old piers 


- 


181 74 


Connecticut River, West Springfield 


Riprapping bank . 


- 


4,070 79 


Cotuit Harbor 


Dredging 




- 


500 00 


East Bay, Osterville .... 


Dredging 




$10,000 00 


44,097 21 


Ellisville Harbor .... 


Dredging 




- 


2,857 50 


Falmouth Heights .... 


Sea wall . 




- 


1,867 42 


Falmouth Inner Harbor . 


Dredging 




- 


9,912 35 


Five Pound Island, Gloucester 


Dredging 




- 


18,649 11 


Gloucester Harbor .... 


Survey . 




- 


361 77 


Herring River, Harwich . 


Survey . 




- 


362 07 


Ipswich River 


Wall and bulkhead 




- 


441 22 


Lobster Cove, Gloucester 


Dredging 




- 


15,443 28 


Lynn Harbor 


Dredging 




- 


13,005 74 


Lynn Harbor and Saugus River 


Dredging 




- 


1,670 04 


Merrimack River .... 


Surveys . 




- 


556 91 


New Bedford Harbor 


Pier 




13,446 74i 


14,974 11 


Newburyport Harbor 


Survey . 




- 


9 02 


Pamet River 


Dredging 




- 


19,221 69 


Plymouth Harbor 




Dredging 




- 


1,432 90 


Popponesset Bay 




Dredging 




- 


14,760 20 


Point Shirley 




Shore protection 




- 


130 45 


Scituate 




Sea walls 




7,000 00 


9,011 68 


Scituate Harbor 




Dredging 




- 


30,920 16 


Sesuit Harbor . 




Jetty 




- 


513 50 


Waquoit Bay 




Repairing breakwater . 


- 


9,071 81 


Westfield River 




Extension of jetties 


- 


1,296 90 


West Bay . 




Dredging .... 


10,000 00 


10,648 71 


Winthrop Shore 




Sea wall 


- 


18 72 


Witchmere Harbor 




Dredging .... 


- 


149 83 


Yarmouthport Harbor 


Dredging .... 


- 


5,000 00 


General 


_ 


- 


4,627 24 










$40,446 74 


$317,708 62 



1 Paid by surety company. 



WATERWAYS. 



65 



Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures from 1893 to 
1920, inclusive, for rlver and harbor work, under the di- 
RECTION of the Department of Public Works, Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands, and its Predecessors, to Nov. 
30, 1920 (excepting Boston Harbor). 



Locality. 



Character of Work. 



Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 



Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 



Acushnet River 

Aliens Harbor, Harwich . 

Aliens Pond, Dartmouth 

Annisquam River, Gloucester 

Apponagansett Harbor and 

River, Dartmouth. 
Barnstable Harbor . 

Bass River, Beverly 

Bass River, Dennis and Yar 

mouth. 
Brant Rock, Marshfield . 

Bucks Creek, Chatham . 

Buzzards Bay, Falmouth 

Cataumet Harbor and Sque- 
teague Pond, Bourne and 
Falmouth. 

Centerville River, Barnstable 

Cohasset Harbor, Cohasset and 

Scituate. 
Concord River, Billerica . 

Connecticut River . 

Connecticut River . 

Connecticut River, Agawam 

Connecticut River, Chicopee 

Connecticut River, Hadley 

Connecticut River, Hatfield 

Connecticut River, Holyoke 

Connecticut River, Holyoke 

Connecticut River, Northamp- 
ton. 

Connecticut River, South Had- 
ley. 

Connecticut River, West Spring- 
field. 

Conservation of waters 

Cotuit Harbor, Barnstable 

Cuttyhunk Harbor, Gosnold . 

Deacons Pond Harbor, Fal- 
mouth.' 



Inspection . 

Surveys 

Survey 

Dredging, removing 
ledges and riprap. 

Survey, dredging and 
stone breakwater. 

Survey and dredging 

Dredging . 

Jetties, dredging and 

survey. 
Sea wall 

Jetties, survey and 

dredging. 
Survey 

Dredging . 



Dredging . 

Breakwater and dredg- 
ing. 
Removing boulders . 

Investigation of navi- 
gation and surveys. 
Improvement 

Protective work 

Survey, wall and rip- 
rap. 

Protective work and 
diversion wall. 

Dikes and riprap 

Marking and lighting 
old piers. 

Dredging and protec- 
tive work. 

Protective work 

Wall .... 
Protective work 
Investigation 
Dredging and survey 
Jetties and dredging . 



$75,962 42 


302 00 


195 95 


107,630 63 


56,159 59 


17,392 18 


25,539 81 


88,089 74 


4,104 58 


29,739 06 


166 11 


26,520 68 


6,103 22 


36,172 55 


1,514 59 


10,637 04 


103 63 


20,396 09 


25,149 02 


100,443 65 


14,751 82 


559 03 


18,815 78 


1,525 80 


6,406 36 


12,002 78 


38,000 00 


60,248 02 


61,828 25 


~ 



$1,500 00 

55,535 75 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

7,350 00 

1,500 00 

20,691 88 

150 00 



640 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

415 00 

1,000 00 



2,000 00 
9,000 00 



$75,962 42 

302 00 

195 95 

107,260 75 

55,786 05 

18,554 64 

81,075 56 

89,104 74 

4,104 58 

31,067 74 

166 11 

33,726 77 

7,603 22 

56,864 43 

1,664 59 

6,970 99 

103 63 

18,814 42 

25,789 02 

97,740 94i 

14,952 57 

559 03 

4,230 78 

1,524 20 

7,379 58 

11,919 27 2 

35,766 26 

59,219 91 

70,754 18 



1 From 1888, inclusive. 



2 From 1891, inclusive. 



3 See Falmouth Inner Harbor. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Appropriations, etc. — Continued. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Duxbury Bay and Harbor 


Dredging . 


$27,798 79 


- 


$27,798 79 


East Bay, Osterville 
Edgartown Harbor . 


Jetties, dredging and 

removing scows. 
Survey 


57,961 56 
205 65 


$10,000 00 


67,627 00 
205 65 


Ellisville Harbor 


Dredging . 


15,144 82 


- 


15,144 82 


Essex County beaches 


Survey 


1,000 00 


- 


1,000 00 


Essex River .... 


Dredging . 


5,000 00 


- 


5,000 00 > 


Fall River Harbor . 


Improvement 


350,290 54 


- 


1,130 18 


Falmouth Heights, Falmouth 


Sea wall 


37,006 94 


13,000 00 


50,006 94 


Falmouth Inner Harbor . 


Dredging, jetties and 

wall. 
Survey 


67,538 57 


14,000 00 


81,538 57 


Glades, North Scituate . 


51 63 


- 


51 63 


Gloucester Harbor, Gloucester 
Green Harbor, Marshfield 
Gun Rock Point, Hull . 


Dredging and remov- 
ing ledges. 

Jetties, dredging and 
survey. 

Breakwater 


74,767 21 
90,804 54 
48,096 11 


7,500 00 
10,000 00 


89,767 21 
76,466 85 
58,096 11 


Harbor Cove, Gloucester . 


Survey and dredging 


18,528 73 


866 00 


19,394 73 


Herring Creek, Scituate . 


Survey 


253 76 


- 


253 76 


Herring River, Harwich . 


Jetties and dredging . 


39,734 34 


2,500 00 


41,590 04 


Herring River, Wellfleet . 


Dikes and ditches 


11,832 74 


10,000 00 


21,800 73 


Housatonic River, Sheffield 


Survey 


2,011 29 


- 


2,011 29 


Hull 


Sea wall and survey . 


25,258 32 


8,882 06 


34,140 38 


Humarock Beach, Scituate 


Survey 


250 00 


- 


236 07 


Hyannisport, Barnstable . 

Improvement of rivers and 

harbors. 
Ipswich River, Ipswich 

Kings Beach, Swampscott 

Lake Anthony, Oak Bluffs 


Survey and break- 
water. 
General expenses 

Jetty, wall, riprap and 
dredging. 

Removal of obstruc- 
tion. 

Jetties and dredging . 


49,988 82 
11,620 06 
47,325 48 
166 41 
63,354 22 


2,500 00 
1,000 00 
2,000 00 


52,488 82 
11,620 06 
48,318 92 
166 41 
62,145 18 


Lake Quannapowitt, Wakefield 


Investigation 


1,004 21 


- 


345 32 


Lewis Bay, Barnstable 


Survey and dredging 


29,211 64 


- 


28,963 21 


Little Harbor, Marblehead 


Dredging . 


8,666 16 


2,500 00 


11,166 16 


Little River, Gloucester . 


Survey 


862 93 


- 


862 93 


Lobster Cove, Gloucester 


Dredging . 


33,047 26 


1,500 00 


34,547 26 


Lynn Harbor, anchorage basin 


Survey and dredging 


121,789 29 


5,200 00 


121,588 07 


Lynn Harbor and Saugus River 


Dredging and filling . 


90,942 35 


37,500 00 


128,442 35 


Manchester Harbor . 


Survey, jetties and 
dredging. 


68,100 67 


43,500 00 


109,078 51 



1 Expended by United States government. 



WATERWAYS. 



67 



Appropriations, etc. — Continued. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Menamsha Inlet, Chilmark and 

Gay Head. 
Merrimack River 

Mill River, Gloucester 


Jetties, dredging and 
sea wall. 

Investigation and sur- 
vey. 

Survey and dredging . 


$63,423 34 

1,308 50 

24,632 86 


$700 00 
300 00 


$64,019 69 

1,208 50 

24,899 59 


Mitchells River, Chatham 


Survey 


322 96 


- 


322 96 


Nantucket Harbor . 


Dredging . 


42,058 63 


1,000 00 


42,779 78 


New Bedford Harbor 


Dredging . 


1,409 76 


- 


1,409 76 


New Bedford Harbor 


Pier, shed and dredg- 


371,899 77 


13,446 74' 


385,346 51 


New Bedford State pier . 


ing. 
Improvement of 


73,461 00 


- 


73,436 38 


New Bedford State pier . 
Newburyport Harbor 


Operation and main- 
tenance. 
Survey 


43,274 33 
115 97 


_ 


43,259 82 
115 97 


Nobscusset Harbor, Dennis 
North River, Marshfield . 
North River, Salem 


Breakwater, dredging 

and riprap. 
Surveys and removing 

rocks. 
Survey 


31,874 49 

6,858 75 
704 52 


1,200 00 
1,800 00 


23,713 94 

8,658 75 

704 52 


Oak Bluffs . . . . 


Removing rocks 


632 45 


- 


594 95 


Oak Bluffs . 


Sea wall 


19,542 11 


2,500 00 


22,042 11 


Onset Bay, Ware ham 


Survey and dredging 


14,295 89 


1,000 00 


15,295 89 


Orleans 


Survey 


104 18 


- 


104 18 


Pamet River, Truro 

Paskamansett River, Dart- 
mouth. 
Penikese Island, Gosnold 


Survey, dredging and 

repairing jetties. 
Dredging and jetty . 


191,096 80 
5,227 68 


1,200 00 


192,296 80 
5,227 68 


Pile wharf and survey 


5,300 00 


- 


5,192 95 


Plum Island River, Newbury 

and Newburyport. 
Plymouth Harbor . 


Survey 
Dredging . 


983 31 
176,214 99 


71,794 55 


983 31 
221,507 27 2 


Popponesset Bay 


Dredging . 


46,252 33 


- 


46,252 33 


Powow River .... 
Province Lands, Provincetown 


Dredging channel and 

riprapping wall. 
Reclamation 


502 94 
88,000 00 


- 


502 94 
85,129 97 


Provincetown Harbor 


Survey 


1,217 78 


- 


1,217 78 


Quansett Harbor, Orleans 


Survey 


195 88 


- 


194 50 


Quicks Hole, Gosnold 


Survey 


500 00 


- 


- 


Red Brook Harbor, Bourne 


Removing pier . 


275 00 


- 


275 00 


Revere 


Stone breakwater 


60,407 09 


- 


60,397 93 


Rock Harbor, Orleans 


Dredging . 


12,108 25 


400 00 


12,492 71 


Rockport Harbor 

Salem Harbor .... 


Dredging and remov- 
ing rocks. 
Survey 


14,429 32 
3,050 05 


- 


13,749 02 
1,050 05 



1 Paid by surety company. 

2 $57,000 expended under direction of United States government. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Appropriations, etc. — 


Concluded. 




Locality. 


Character of W 7 ork. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Salt Pond River, Eastham 


Survey 


$210 11 


- 


$210 11 


Salters Point, Dartmouth 


Breakwater 


13,509 59 


$1,500 00 


15,009 59 


Sandwich Harbor 

Saugus River, Lynn and Saugus 


Dredging channel, rip- 
rap and jetties. 
Survey and dredging 


80,579 84 
19,206 64 


2,000 00 


80,579 84 
20,845 17 


Scituate ..... 


Sea wall and riprap . 


63,522 48 


7,235 00 


69,652 61 


Scituate Harbor 


Dredging . 


96,663 92 


8,300 00 


104,963 92 


Scorton Harbor, Sandwich 


Jetty and dredging . 


19,426 39 


500 00 


17,774 34 


Sesuit Harbor, Dennis 


Jetty .... 


28,067 85 


1,500 00 


24,555 10 


Sippican Harbor, Marion 


Survey 


7 17 


- 


7 17 


Smith's Cove, Gloucester 


Survey and dredging 


5,163 07 


- 


5,163 02 


South River, Salem . 


Dredging . 


10,523 65 


3,000 00 


13,462 66 


South Watuppa Pond, Fall 

River. 
Stage Harbor, Chatham . 


Fenders and excava- 
tion. 
Dikes and survey 


203 42 
10,803 01 


- 


203 42 
10,803 01 


Taunton River 
Taunton-Brockton waterway . 


Survey and investiga- 
tion. 
Investigation 


5,532 % 99 
5,388 46 


— 


1,960 51 
5,278 18 


Taunton River-Boston Harbor 

Canal. 
Taunton River-Massachusetts 

Bay Canal. 
Vineyard Haven Harbor . 


Survey 
Survey 
Repairing sea wall 


10,000 00 

11,786 71 

9,210 06 


2,380 50 


9,932 75- 
11,786 71 
11,590 50 


Vineyard Haven Harbor, Tis- 

bury. 
Waquoit Bay, Falmouth . 


Breakwater and dredg- 
ing. 

Breakwater wall and 
bulkhead. 

Survey and dredging 


45,089 48 
29,583 79 


1,000 00 
2,000 00 


45,518 25 
31,285 40 


Wareham River 


37,349 27 


5,000 00 


42,349 27 


Warrens Cove, Plymouth 


Sea wall 


14,468 97 


9,713 98 


24,481 22 


Watch Hill, Chatham 


Survey and riprap 


15,020 47 


- 


14,968 75 


Wellfleet Harbor 


Survey and dredging 


16,867 22 


1,500 00 


17,600 29 


West Bay, Barnstable 


Jetties and dredging . 


59,281 84 


10,000 00 


59,244 47 


West Falmouth Harbor, Fal- 
mouth. 
West Harwich .... 


Dredging . 

Survey 


25,655 31 
9 00 


; 


24,386 18 
9 00 


West field River 


Survey, jetties . 


6,296 90 


- 


6,037 29 


Wild Harbor, Falmouth . 


Jetty and dredging . 


15,671 59 


5,000 00 


15,614 72 


Winthrop shore 

Witchmere Harbor, Harwich . 


Sea walls and protec- 
tive work. 
Jetties and dredging 


17,021 51 
28,912 11 


3,000 00 
1,000 00 


20,021 51 
29,769 41 


Woods Hole, Great Harbor, Fal- 
mouth. 
Wrecks 

Yarmouthport Harbor . 


Dredging . 

Removal from tide- 
water. 
Survey 


5,468 86 
65,816 66 
83,977 37 


1,500 00 
7,000 00 


6,968 86 

7,005 08 

90,977 37 




$4,404,052 06 


$446,201 46 


$4,316,557 56 



WATERWAYS. 



69 



FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Federal appropriations and expenditures for improvement of 
rivers and harbors in Massachusetts from the establishment of 
the government to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1920, as shown in the following tables, furnished by the Chief of 
Engineers, U . S. A. : — 

Table No. 1. — Localities at Present under Improvement. 

[Compiled from the annual report of the Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., for the fiscal year ending 

June 30, 1920.] 



Locality. 



Expenditures. 



Appropriations. 



Newburyport Harbor 

Merrimack River 

Sandy Bay, Cape Ann, harbor of refuge . 
Gloucester Harbor . . ,. 

Beverly Harbor 

Salem Harbor 

Lynn Harbor 

Mystic River (upper portion) 3 

Mystic River (below mouth of Island End River) 3 . 

Maiden River 

Boston Harbor* 

Dorchester Bay and Neponset River .... 

Weymouth Fore River 

Weymouth Back River 

Plymouth Harbor 

Provincetown Harbor 

Pollock Rip Shoals, Nantucket Sound 

Nantucket Harbor of refuge 

New Bedford and Fairhaven Harbors 

Taunton River 

Fall River Harbor 

Totals .... 



$494,059 85 

404,388 92 

1,941,478 00 

538,183 00 

49,125 00 

71,368 66 

471,000 77 

305,031 34 

71,285 18 
12,572,068 13 

95,008 00 
439,569 05 

26,500 00 
363,868 69 
348,062 72 
443,785 22 
574,797 95 
769,310 00 
201,888 76 
380,911 49 



$494,100 00 
414,466 72i 
1,950,000 00 ' 
542,083 00 
110,625 00 
71,368 66 2 
476,837 00 

336,050 00 

149,950 00 
12,675,827 58 

95,233 00 
573,750 00 

27,000 00 
391,959 80 
362,162 97 
665,000 00 
586,473 50 
769,310 00 
210,189 18 
380,911 49 



),561,690 73 



$21,283,297 90 



was carried to the surplus fund of the treasury from 



1 Of original amount appropriated, 
previous project. 

2 Of original amount appropriated, $1,131.34 was carried to the surplus fund of the treasury. 

3 Now consolidated as one improvement. 

4 Including Chelsea Creek. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Table No. 2. — Localities in which Work is not now in Progress. 

[Compiled from data furnished by the United States Treasury Department and the Chief of 

Engineers, U. S. A.] 



Locality. 



Expenditures. 



Appropriations. 



Bass River . 
Buzzards Bay Harbor . 
Canapitset Channel 
Chatham Harbor 
Cohasset Harbor . 
Duxbury Harbor 
East Dennis Breakwater 
Edgartown Harbor 
Essex River . 
Hingham Harbor 
Hyannis Harbor . 
Ipswich River 
Kingston Harbor 
Little Harbor, Woods Hole . 
Manchester Harbor 
Marblehead Harbor 
Marthas Vineyard Harbor . 
Powow River 
Rockport Harbor 
Scituate Harbor . 
Town River . 
Vineyard Haven Harbor 
Wareham Harbor 
Wellfleet Harbor . 
Westport Harbor and River 
Winthrop Harbor 
Woods Hole Channel . 
Totals . 



$20,150 34 

2,500 00 

5,312 54 

12,171 36 

10,000 00 

37,000 00 

7 57 

25,000 00 

30,000 00 

38,316 58 

221,787 75 

5,617 91 

8,940 09 

18,000 00 

23,985 57 

833 42 

7,000 00 

50,940 72 

91,229 25 

104,590 98 

37,577 41 

55,387 35 

95,997 30 

11,365 57 

3,000 00 

9,000 00 

343,599 92 



$20,150 41 

2,500 00 

9,800 00 

13,732 79 

10,000 00 

37,000 00 

1,500 00 

25,000 00 

30,000 00 

39,000 00 

221,267 07 

7,500 00 

10,000 00 

18,000 00 

24,300 00 

1,900 00 

7,000 00 

51,000 00 

91,232 57 

104,680 00 

37,577 41 

60,000 00 

96,236 00 

16,000 00 

3,000 00 

9,000 00 

344,000 00 



$1,269,311 63 



$1,291,376 25 



Recapitulation. 


Expenditures. 


Appropriations. 


Total of Table No. 1 

Total of Table No. 2 


$20,561,690 73 
1,269,311 63 


$21,283,297 90 
1,291,376 25 




$21,831,002 36 


$22,574,674 15 



WATERWAYS. 



71 



Expenditures on Boston Harbor and its Tributaries to 

June 30, 1920. 

(The tributaries given are those now under improvement, and do not include tributaries here- 
tofore improved.] 



Locality. 


Expenditures. 


Appropriations. 


Boston Harbor proper * 

Mystic River (below mouth of Island End River) 2 . 

Mystic River (upper portion) 2 

Maiden River 


$12,572,068 13 

1 

J. 305,031 34 

J 

71,285 18 


$12,675,827 58 
336,050 00 
149,950 00 


Totals 


$12,948,384 65 


$13,161,827 58 



1 Including Chelsea Creek. 



2 Now one improvement. 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contracts awarded by the Directors of the Port of Boston 



fCon- 
tract 
No. 


WOBK. 


Contractor. 


Date. 


51 


Reclamation of fiats at East Boston 


Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Com- 
pany. 


Mar. 14, 1916 



Contracts made by the Commission on Waterways and Public 



Con- 
tract 
No. 


Work. 


Contractor. 


Date. 


9 


Extension of contract No. 51 (Di- 
rectors of the Port of Boston) for 
dredging and filling at East Bos- 
ton. 


Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Com- 
pany. 


Oct. 6, 1916 


31 


Houghs Neck, Quincy, sea wall 


Dennis F. Crowley . 


Sept. 18, 1917 


75 


Dry Dock Avenue, South Boston, 
paving. 


Coleman Brothers 


May 12, 1919 


78 


Gloucester Harbor, dredging . 


Boston Dredging Company 


July 28, 1919 


80 


Popponesset Bay and West Bay, 
dredging. 


John R. Burke .... 


June 16, 1919 


86 


Lynn Harbor and Saugus River, 
dredging. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


July 28, 1919 


88 


East Boston, bulkhead . 


W. S. Rendle .... 


Sept. 3, 1919 


91 


Dry Dock, South Boston, dredging 
approach. 


Boston Dredging Company 


Aug. 20, 1919 


93 


Weir River, Boston Harbor, dredg- 
ing. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Sept. 15, 1919 


95 


Orient Heights, East Boston, dredg- 
ing. 


Gerrish Dredging Company 


Oct. 3, 1919 


96 


Waquoit Bay, Falmouth and Mash- 
pee, repairing breakwater. 


E. S. Belden & Sons, Incorpo- 
rated. 


Oct. 29, 1919 


97 


South Boston, industrial tracks 
south of Summer Street. 


J. F. Kennedy & Co. 


Nov. 24, 1919 


98 


New Bedford State Pier, fire sprin- 
klers. 


General Fire Extinguisher Com- 
pany. 


Nov. 26, 1919 


99 


New Bedford State pier, freight ele- 
vator. 


F. S. Payne Company 


Nov. 26, 1919 



WATERWAYS. 



73 



and in Force during the Year ending Nov. 30, 1920. 



Condition of 
Work. 


Contract Prices. 


Amount 
paid during 
Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1920. 


Total 
paid to 
Nov. 30, 

1920. 


Estimated 
Amount of 
Contract. 


Completed Nov. 
27, 1920. 


15.47 cents per cubic yard 


$391,075 92 


$1,336,156 68 


$1,338,322 951 



1 Includes extension of original contract. 

Lands and in Force during the Year ending Nov. 30, 1920. 



Condition of 
Work. 



Contract Prices. 



Amount 
paid during 
Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1920. 



Total 
paid to 
Nov. 30, 

1920. 



Estimated 

Amount of 

Contract. 






Completed Nov. 
27, 1920. 



Completed June 
19, 1920. 

Completed Dec. 
13, 1919. 

In progress . 

Completed Aug. 
3, 1920. 



Completed Dec. 
4, 1919. 



Completed Dec. 

20, 1919. 

Completed July 
28, 1920. 

Completed Nov. 

27, 1920. 

Completed Aug. 

28, 1920. 

Completed June 
7, 1920. 

Completed May 

21, 1920. 

Completed April 
25, 1920. 



Completed Sept. 
17, 1920. 



15.47 cents per cubic yard 



Unit prices 



Unit prices 

Unit prices 

For dredging, 63^ cents per cubic 
yard, measured in situ. For ex- 
cavating boulders, $12.50 per 
cubic yard. 

For dredging, 67 cents per cubic 
yard, scow measurement. For 
excavating boulders, $20 per 
cubic yard. 

$44.45 per linear foot of completed 
bulkhead. 

For dredging, 65 cents per cubic 
yard, measured in scows. 

For dredging, 53 cents per cubic 
yard, measured in scows. 

For dredging, 33 cents per cubic 
yard, measured in place. 

For furnishing and placing stone, 
$7.50 per ton. 

Unit prices 



For furnishing and installing 
sprinklers and fire extinguishing 
apparatus, $6,921. For furnish- 
ing and installing a pipe connec- 
tion, $417. For furnishing ad- 
ditional sprinklers, $5.50 per 
sprinkler. 

Lump sum of $4,796 



$12,510 81 

45,154 31 

16,448 57 
15,395 36 

13,874 73 

23,778 60 

25,331 35 

84,692 68 

15,107 50 

8,876 84 

9,181 63 

7,523 51 



$17,950 81 

173,929 13 

52,217 06 
32,484 92 

67,132 66 

72,364 60 

136,528 60 

118,539 65 

27,169 00 

10,608 23 

9,181 63 

7,523 51 



4,796 00 



4,796 00 



$14,576 50 

149,103 00 

38,000 00 

35,000 00 

30,150 00 

71,120 00 

130,000 00 

100,700 00 

40,000 00 

4,500 00 

9,275 25 

7,338 00 



4,796 00 



1 See contract No. 51. 






74 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contracts made by the Department of Public Works, Division 

Year ending 



Con- 
tract 
No. 


Work. 


Contractor. 


Date. 


1 


Mystic River, dredging at Island 
End River. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Dec. 11, 1919 


2 


Mystic River, dredging at Maiden 
bridge. 


Boston Dredging Company 


Dec. 8, 1919 


3 


North Scituate, concrete sea wall . 


William H. Connor . 


Feb. 24, 1920 


4 


East Boston, filling back of bulk- 
head. 


John R. Burke .... 


Feb. 13, 1920 


5 


Dry Dock, South Boston, clearing 
entrance channel. 


George T. Rendle Company . 


April 9, 1920 


6 


Scituate Harbor, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


May 24, 1920 


7 


East Bay, Barnstable, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


June 28, 1920 


8 


West Bay, Barnstable, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


July 1, 1920 


9 


Herring River, Witchmere Harbor, 
Bass River, redredging channels. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


June 3, 1920 


10 


Falmouth Inner Harbor, dredging . 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


June 3, 1920 


12 


Haywards Creek, dredging and fill- 
ing. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


May 10, 1920 


13 


Ellisville Harbor, Plymouth, exca- 
vating channel. 


George A. Finney and P. H. 
Marsh. 


May 10, 1920 


14 


Acushnet River, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Aug. 2, 1920 


15 


East Boston, dredging at Jeffries 
Yacht Club. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


June 8, 1920 


16 


Bullock Street, South Boston, pav- 
ing. 


B. E. Grant Company 


July 19, 1920 


17 


Winthrop Harbor, dredging . 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Sept. 10, 1920 



WATERWAYS. 



75 



of Waterways and Public Lands, and in Force during the 
Nov. 30, 1920. 



Condition of 
Work. 



Contract Prices. 



Amount 
paid during 
Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1920. 



Total 
paid to 
Nov. 30, 

1920. 



Estimated 

Amount of 

Contract. 



Completed March 
30, 1920. 

Completed July 
1, 1920. 

Completed Aug. 
12, 1920. 



Completed May 
28, 1920. 

Completed July 
23, 1920. 

Completed July 
20, 1920. 



Completed Oct. 
22, 1920. 



In progress . 



Work at Bass 
River com- 
pleted Aug. 3, 
1920. 

Completed July 
9, 1920. 



Completed Aug. 
13, 1920. 



Completed July 
31, 1920. 

In progress . 



Completed July 
31, 1920. 

Completed Dec. 
1, 1920. 

In progress . 



Dredging, 65 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. 

Dredging, 50 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. 

For furnishing materials and build- 
ing wall, $14 per cubic yard of 
concrete measured in place in 
completed work. For additional 
material for filling back of wall, 
$2 per cubic yard of material in 
place. 



$22.90 per 
dredge. 



hour of work by the 



Lump sum of $12,600 



Dredging, 59.8 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 

Dredging, 78 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 

Dredging, 78 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 

Dredging, $1.20 per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. For excavat- 
ing boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 

Dredging, 58 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $12 per cubic yard. 

For material excavated by hy- 
draulic dredge, 38 cents per cubic 
yard, measured by cross section 
in excavation. For material ex- 
cavated by dipper dredge, 65 
cents per cubic yard, measured 
in scows. 

Lump sum of $1,000 

Dredging, 52 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $16 per cubic yard. 

Dredging, 50 cents per cubic yard, 
measured in scows. 

Unit prices 



Dredging, 47.9 cents per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. 



$73,340 80 
54,125 00 
14,730 33 



13,224 75 
12,600 00 
30,030 95 

42,017 65 

7,397 75 

14,404 80 

9,368 74 
98,773 56 



1,000 00 
72,596 56 

1,728 50 
45,727 87 



$73,340 80 
54,125 00 
14,730 33 



13,224 75 
12,600 00 
30,030 95 

42,017 65 

7,397 75 

14,404 80 

9,368 74 
98,773 56 



1,000 00 
72,596 56 

1,728 50 
45,727 87 



$69,550 00 
47,500 00 
10,120 00 



20,000 00 
12,600 00 
29,900 00 

36,660 00 

31,200 00 

14,000 00 

9,280 00 
80,000 00 



1,000 00 
112,320 00 

1,800 00 
52,345 00 
12,100 00 



76 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contracts made by the Department of Public Works, Division 

Year ending 



Con- 
tract 
No. 


Work. 


Contractor. 


Date. 


18 
20 


Lobster Cove, Gloucester and New- 
buryport Harbor, dredging basins. 

Brant Rock, Marshfield, spur jetties 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 

William H. Connor . 


Sept. 1, 1920 
Sept. 10, 1920 



WATERWAYS. 



77 



of Waterways and Public Lands, and in Force during the 
Nov. 30, 1920 — Concluded. 



Condition of 
Work. 


Contract Prices. 


Amount 
paid during 
Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1920. 


Total 
paid to 
Nov. 30, 

1920. 


Estimated 
Amount of 
Contract. 


Work at Lobster 
Cove completed 
Oct. 2, 1920. 

Completed Oct. 
25, 1920. 


Dredging at Lobster Cove, 65 cents 
per cubic yard, scow measure- 
ment. Excavating boulders at 
Lobster Cove, $18 per cubic 
yard. Dredging at Newbury- 
port Harbor, SI. 65 per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. Excavating 
boulders at Newbury port Har- 
bor, $18 per cubic yard. 

For furnishing materials and build- 
ing jetties, $21.50 per cubic yard 
of concrete measured in place in 
the completed work. 


$14,931 15 
2,832 62 


$14,931 15 
2,832 62 


$15,000 00 
3,332 50 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



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WATERWAYS. 



91 



Taunton River at Titicut Railroad Station, Mass. 

Summary of Daily and Monthly Discharge for the Period from March to 

September, 1920. 

[Drainage area, 185 square miles.] 








Maximum Day. 


Minimum Day. 


Mean 
Disch 


Daily 

ARGE. 


















Run-off 

Depth 

in Inches. 


.MONTH. 


Second- 
feet. 


Second- 
feet per 
Square 
Mile. 


Second- 
feet. 


Second- 
feet per 
Square 
Mile. 


Second- 
feet. 


Second- 
feet per 
Square 
Mile. 


March 


4,000 


21.600 


250 


1.350 


1,730.0 


9.350 


10.78 


April 


1,230 


6.650 


460 


2.490 


789.0 


4.260 


4.75 


May 


1,320 


7.140 


316 


1.710 


665.0 


3.590 


4.14 


June 


1,510 


8.160 


338 


1.830 


753.0 


4.070 


4.54 


July 


361 


1.950 


100 


.541 


191.0 


1.030 


1.19 


August 


272 


1.470 


45 


.243 


122.0 


.659 


.76 


September 


117 


.632 


42 


.227 


69.3 


.375 


.42 



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WATERWAYS. 



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INDEX 



INDEX. 



Department of Public Works. 

Appointments, Assignments and Organization, under ch. 350, Gen. Acts 
of 1919 



PAGE 



3-6 



Division of Waterways and Public- Lands. 

Acushnet River .......... 19 

Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor 

Work, from 1893 to Nov. 30, 1920, excepting Boston Harbor . 65 

Bass River, Dennis and Yarmouth ....... 20 

Boston Harbor ........••• 7 

Anchorage Basin ......... 12 

Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for Improvement 
of Small Harbors and Channels within Boston Harbor, 1893 

to 1920, inclusive 63 

Belle Isle Inlet 12 

Boston Harbor Dredging ........ 57 

Commonwealth Flats at East Boston . . . . . 11 

Commonwealth Flats at South Boston ...... 7 

Bullock Street Paving 10 

Commonwealth Pier No. 5 ...... 7 

Commonwealth Pier No. 6 ...... 8 

Development of Land South of Summer Street ... 9 

Dry Dock 8 

Dry Dock Avenue ........ 9 

Reserved Channel Bulkhead . . . . . . . 10 

Trolley Freight Shed . 10 

Commonwealth Terminal on Weymouth Fore River and Hay wards 

Creek 16 

Expenditures for Development and Improvement in Boston Harbor, 

1859-1920 61 

Financial Statement ......... 52-60 

Harbor Compensation Fund ....... 52 

Hay wards Creek ......... 16 

Hough's Neck, Quincy . . . . . . . 12, 57 

Income of Harbor Compensation Fund ...... 52 

Investigation as to Certain Rivers in Boston Harbor ... 58 
Investigation as to Feasibility of Bridge or Tunnel, Boston to East 

Boston .......... 58 

Jeffries Yacht Club, Dredging ....... 13 

Mystic River, Dredging ........ 13 

Orient Heights, Dredging ........ 14 

Port of Boston Fund ......... 52-56 

United States Harbor Lines in Chelsea Creek and Mystic River . 15 

Weir River, Dredging ......... 15 

Winthrop Harbor, Dredging . . . . . . . 15 



100 



INDEX. 



Brant Rock, Marshfield ........ 

Cohasset Harbor ......... 

Conserving and equalizing the Flow of Water in Rivers and Streams 
United States Geological Survey, Summary of Stream Flow Record 

Contracts made and pending during 1920 ..... 

Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor Work, Dec. '. 
1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 

East Bay, Osterville . 

Ellisville Harbor, Plymouth 

Fall River Harbor, State Pier 

Falmouth Inner Harbor 

Federal Appropriations and Expenditures in Massachusetts Rivers and 
Harbors to June 30, 1920 . 

Financial Statement ..... 

Fish Weir Permits approved during the Year 

Gloucester Harbor 

Five Pound Island 
Lobster Cove 

Great Ponds 

Herring River, Harwich 

Income 

Katama Bay, Edgartown 

Licenses granted during the Year 

Lynn Harbor and Saugus River . 

Massachusetts Atlas Sheets and Town Boundary Atlases 

Miscellaneous Permits granted during the Year 

Xew Bedford State Pier 
Income 
Operation . 
Nevvburyport Harbor 
Popponesset Bay and West Bay 
Port of Boston Fund . 
Province Lands 
Receipts, 1920 . 

Recommendations for Legislation 
Re-establishment of Certain Triangulation Points 
Rivers, Harbors, Tide Waters and Foreshores, exclusive 
Scituate Harbor 

Scituate Sea Walls, North Scituate 
State Boundaries 

Waquoit Bay, Falmouth and Mashpee 
Waterways Fund 
West Bax, Barnstable 
Westfield River 
Witchmere Harbor ! 



of Boston Harbor 



PAGE 

21 

21 

31 

78-95 

72 

63 
21 
22 
22 
23 

69 
52 
' i 
23 
23 
24 
31 
24 
60 
24 
35 
25 
34 
41 
25 
60 
58 
26 
27 

52-56 
33 
59 

50,51 
34 
18 
27 
28 
32 
29 
59 
29 
30 
30 



Public Document 



No. 54 



3Tt)c <JkmtmomDeattl) of Jtta00<ul)uMt0 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Department of Public Works 






FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1921 




BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 



Publication of this Document 

appboved by the 
Supebvisor of Administration. 



®t)e CommcntDealtt) of Jtla00acl)U0ett0 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts. 

Pursuant to the provisions of law, I have the honor as 
Commissioner of Public Works to submit the second annual 
report of the Department of Public Works for the fiscal year 
ending Nov. 30, 1921. 

Chapter 350, General Acts of 1919, abolished the Massa- 
chusetts Highway Commission and the Commission on Water- 
ways and Public Lands, and established the Department of 
Public Works, which was to be organized in two divisions, 
namely, a Division of Highways and a Division of Waterways 
and Public Lands, and made said Department the successor 
of said commissions. 

Some of the provisions of chapter 350 aforesaid are now 
found in chapter 16, General Laws, which provides: — 

Section 1. There shall be a department of public works, consisting 
of a division of highways and a division of waterways and public lands. 

Section 2. The department shall be under the supervision and con- 
trol of a commissioner of public works and four associate commissioners. 
Upon the expiration of the term of office of a commissioner or an associate 
commissioner, his successor shall be appointed for three years by the 
governor, with the advice and consent of the council. The commissioner 
shall receive such salary, not exceeding seventy-five hundred dollars, 
and the associate commissioners such salaries, not exceeding six thousand 
dollars, as the governor and council may determine. The commissioner 
and associate commissioners shall be allowed their actual traveling and 
other necessary expenses. 

Section 3. Two of the associate commissioners shall be designated 
by the governor to have charge of the division of highways, and two to 
have charge of the division of waterways and public lands. Whenever 
a change in the associate commissioners occurs, the governor may make 
a new designation. The commissioner may act as a member of both 
divisions, and when present shall act as chairman of the division. The 



4 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

concurrence of two members shall be necessary in any official act of 
either division. 

Section 4. The commissioner shall be the executive and adminis- 
trative head of the department. He shall approve all contracts made by 
either division, and may require any of the expenditures of either divi- 
sion to be submitted to him for approval. He may appoint, assign to 
divisions, transfer and remove such officials and employees as the work 
of the department may require, and fix their compensation. 

Section 5. The commissioner shall appoint and may remove, sub- 
ject to the approval of the governor and council, an official to be known 
as the registrar of motor vehicles, and may, with like approval, fix his 
compensation. 

Section 6. Except as otherwise provided by sections thirty-one and 
forty-one of chapter ninety and section sixty of chapter one hundred and 
forty, all rules and regulations within the jurisdiction of the division of 
highways or the division of waterways and public lands shall be drafted 
by the associate commissioners having charge of said division, shall be 
submitted to the commissioner and associate commissioners sitting as a 
board, and shall take effect when approved by them, and at such time as 
they shall designate. Said board shall also have power to make all need- 
ful rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions of law relating to 
the department. 

Section 7. The commissioner shall make an annual report contain- 
ing, in addition to other matters required by law the following: 

A list of the expenditures of the division of highways, with such state- 
ments relative to the construction and maintenance of public ways and 
such recommendations as to the general policy of the commonwealth 
relative thereto as it considers appropriate. 

He shall also make an annual report containing, in addition to other 
matters required by law, a statement of the acts of the division of water- 
ways and public lands. 

The personnel during the year ending Nov. 30, 1921, was 
as follows : — 

Commissioner of Public Works, John N. Cole. 

Division of Highways. 

Associate Commissioner, Frank D. Kemp. 
Associate Commissioner, James W. Synan. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Associate Commissioner, Jesse B. Baxter. 
Associate Commissioner, Richard K. Hale. 

Executive Secretary for the Department, Frederick N. Wales. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



Division of Highivays. 

Chief Engineer, Arthur W. Dean. 
Construction Engineer, Franklin C. Pillsbury. 
District Engineers : — 

District No. 1, Berkshire County, George A. Curtis. 

District No. 2, Franklin and Hampshire counties, H. D. Phillips. 

District No. 3, Hampden and Worcester counties, John A. Johnston. 

District No. 4, Middlesex County, F. D. Sabin. 

District No. 5, Essex and Suffolk counties, D. H. Dickinson. 

District No. 6, Norfolk and Bristol counties, R. W. Coburn. 

District No. 7, Plymouth, Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket counties, 
George H. Delano. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Mary A. Riley. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Fred Fair. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Chief Engineer, Frank W. Hodgdon. 

Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for Boston Harbor, John N. Ferguson. 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for harbors and waterways outside Bos- 
ton Harbor, Francis L. Sellew. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Edna F. Townsend. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Cora I. Allen. 

Bridge Engineer for the Department, William F. Williams. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 
Registrar, Frank A. Goodwin. 
Chief Clerk, Charles R. Gilley. 
Chief of Inspection Force, Albert S. Olsson. 

A detailed report is presented herewith, covering the activi- 
ties for the year of the Division of Highways, the Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands, and the Registry of Motor 
Vehicles. 

JOHN N. COLE, 

Commissioner. 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 







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DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS. 



Appropriations. 
The appropriations for the construction and repair of State 
highways during the period 1903 to 1921, inclusive, were — 



1903 
1907 
1912 
1919 



Total 



. $2,250,00Cf 00 1 

. 2,500,000 00 1 

. 5,000,000 00 1 

. 4,000,000 00 2 

. $13,750,000 00 



The total of such appropriations during the period 1894 to 
Nov. 30, 1921, inclusive, was $18,250,000. 

The appropriations for maintenance during the period 1914 
to 1921, inclusive, paid from the treasury of the Common- 
wealth, were — 



1914 . 












. 


$350,000 00 3 


1915 . 












. 


350,000 00 3 


1916 . 














415,000 00 3 


1917 . 














404,547 86 3 


1918 . 














258,462 80 


1919 . 












. 


312,524 64 


1920 . 














358,889 44 


1921 . 








367,697 00 


Total 


$2,817,121 74 



The total of such appropriations during the period 1903 to 
Nov. 30, 1921, inclusive, was $4,331,288.40. 

The appropriations made in 1921, and relating to the De- 
partment of Public Works, Division of Highways, are included 
in various items in chapters 203 and 502, Acts of 1921, which 
follow. 

Chapter 203, Acts of 1921, making appropriations for the 

1 To cover expense of construction for a period of five years. 

2 To cover expense of construction for a period of four years, 1920-23, inclusive. 

3 Includes appropriations for widening. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

maintenance of departments, boards, commissions, institu- 
tions and certain activities of the Commonwealth, for interest, 
sinking fund and serial bond requirements, and for certain 
permanent improvements, is, in part, as follows : — 

Service of the Department of Public Works. 
Item 

575 For the salaries of the commissioner and the four associate com- 

missioners, a sum not exceeding thirty-one thousand five 

hundred dollars $31,500 00 

576 For personal services of clerks and assistants to the commis- 

sioner, a sum not exceeding twelve thousand eight hundred 

and fifty dollars 12,850 00 

576 1 For traveling expenses of the commissioner, a sum not exceed- 
ing fifteen hundred dollars ...... 1,500 00 



Total $45,850 00 

Division of Highways (the following appropriations for 
the operation and maintenance of this division, except 
as otherwise provided, are made from the receipts in the 
Motor Vehicle Fees Fund) : 

577 For the personal services of the chief engineer, engineers and 

office assistants, including certain clerks and stenographers, 
a sum not exceeding forty-seven thousand five hundred 
dollars $47,500 00 

578 For traveling expenses of the associate commissioners, when 

traveling in the discharge of their official duties, a sum not 

exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars .... 2,500 00 

579 For services other than personal, including printing the annual 

report and necessary office supplies and equipment, a sum 

not exceeding twelve thousand dollars .... 12,000 00 

580 For the care, repair and storage, replacement and purchase of 

road-building machinery and tools, a sum not exceeding 

three hundred thousand dollars ..... 300,000 00 

581 For the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths on state 

highways, a sum not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars . 15,000 00 

582a For the construction and repair of town and county ways, a 

sum not exceeding seven hundred thousand dollars . . 700,000 00 

582& For aiding towns in the repair and improvement of public ways, 

a sum not exceeding four hundred thousand dollars . . 400,000 00 

582c For the maintenance and repair of state highways, a sum not 
exceeding two million ten thousand five hundred dollars, of 
which sum three hundred sixty-seven thousand six hundred 
and ninety-seven dollars represents the receipts from assess- 
ments upon certain cities and towns for the maintenance of 
state highways, and the balance from receipts in the Motor 
Vehicle Fees Fund 2,010,500 00 

582d For engineering service and expenses, a sum not exceeding two 

hundred thousand dollars 200,000 00 

583 For the maintenance and operation of the Newburyport bridge 
and the Brightman street bridge in Fall River, in accordance 
with the provisions of existing laws, a sum not exceeding 
twenty-nine thousand dollars ...... 29,000 00 



Total $3,716,500 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 11 

Item 

Registration of Motor Vehicles: 

584 For personal services, a sum not exceeding three hundred thirty- 

two thousand five hundred dollars, from receipts in the Motor 

Vehicle Fees Fund $332,500 00 

585 For services other than personal, including traveling expenses, 

purchase of necessary supplies, equipment and materials, in- 
cluding cartage and storage of the same, and for work inci- 
dental to the registration and licensing of owners of motor 
vehicles, a sum not exceeding two hundred forty thousand 
dollars, from receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund . 240,000 00 



Total $572,500 00 

586 For the purpose of enabling the department of public works 
to secure federal aid for the construction of highways, a sum 
not exceeding one million dollars in addition to any other 
funds which the department has available for the purpose; 
of the said sum seven hundred fifty thousand dollars shall be 
payable from receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund, and 
the balance from receipts from counties for assessments on 
highways previously constructed, or from the general fund $1,000,000 00 

587 J For the care of snow on highways, as provided by section nine- 
teen of chapter eighty-one of the General Laws, a sum not 
exceeding fifty thousand dollars, from receipts in the Motor 
Vehicle Fees Fund $50,000 00 

588 1 For administering the law relative to advertising signs near 
highways, a sum not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars, to be 
paid from the general fund ...... $15,000 00 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands: 

589 For personal services of the chief engineer and assistants, a sum 

not exceeding fifty-nine thousand dollars, from receipts in the 

Port of Boston Fund $59,000 00 

590 For necessary traveling expenses of the associate commis- 

sioners, a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars . . 1,000 00 

591 For services other than personal, including printing and bind- 

ing the annual report, and for necessary office and engineering 
supplies and equipment, a sum not exceeding eight thousand 
dollars 8,000 00 

592 For the care and maintenance of the Province lands, a sum not 

exceeding four thousand dollars ..... 4,000 00 

593 For the maintenance of structures, and for repairing damages 

along the coast line or river banks of the commonwealth, and 
for the removal of wrecks and other obstructions from tide- 
waters and great ponds, and for gauging of streams in co- 
operation with the federal government, a sum not exceeding 
twenty-five thousand dollars ...... 25,000 00 

594 For the improvement, development and protection of rivers 

and harbors, tidewaters and foreshores within the common- 
wealth, as provided by chapter two hundred and thirty-one 
of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and nineteen, and of 
great ponds, a sum not exceeding two hundred fifty thousand 
dollars . 250,000 00 

1 See reference to this item in 1921, 502, section 2, under item 28c. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Item 

595 For re-establishing and permanently marking certain triangular 
points and sections as required by order of the land court, in 
accordance with section thirty-three of chapter ninety-one 
of the General Laws, a sum not exceeding one thousand 
dollars $1,000 00 

597 For the supervision and operation of commonwealth pier five, 

including the salaries or other compensation of employees, 
and for the repair and replacement of equipment and other 
property, a sum not exceeding eighty-nine thousand dollars, 
from receipts in the Port of Boston Fund .... 89,000 00 

598 For the maintenance of pier one, at East Boston, a sum not ex- 

ceeding fifteen thousand dollars, from receipts in the Port of 

Boston Fund 15,000 00 

599 For the maintenance and improvement of commonwealth prop- 

erty under the control of the division, a sum not exceeding 
fifty-five thousand dollars, from receipts in the Port of Boston 
Fund 55,000 00 

600 For the operation and maintenance of the New Bedford state 

pier, a sum not exceeding ten thousand dollars . . . 10,000 00 

601 For the compensation of dumping inspectors, a sum not exceed- 

ing two thousand dollars, to be paid from the Waterways 

Fund 2,000 00 

601 \ For the payment of money due contractors for work done and 
material furnished in the construction of the dry dock at 
South Boston and held by the commonwealth as retained 
percentages, the amount received from the federal govern- 
ment as the final payment in connection with the purchase 
of the dry dock and placed in the Port of Boston Fund, the 
sum of sixty thousand thirty-four dollars and twenty-two 
cents 60,034 22 



Total $579,034 22 

The following appropriations for special improvements 
are to be made from the Port of Boston Fund: 

602 For dredging and filling upon property of the commonwealth, 

a sum not exceeding three hundred seventy thousand dollars, 
the same to be in addition to any sum heretofore appropriated 
for the purpose $370,000 00 

603 For improvements of the commonwealth pier at East Boston, a 

sum not exceeding four thousand dollars .... 4,000 00 

604 For dredging in and about minor channels in Boston harbor, a 

sum not exceeding eighty thousand dollars, the same to be in 

addition to any sum heretofore appropriated for the purpose 80,000 00 

605 For the construction of a pier and the improvement of land and 

flats near Hayward's creek in the city of Quincy and the town 
of Braintree, a sum not exceeding one hundred sixty thousand 
dollars 160,000 00 

606 For street and pier improvements and developments upon 

property of the commonwealth at South Boston, a sum not 
exceeding one hundred forty thousand dollars, the same to 
be in addition to any amount heretofore appropriated for the 
purpose 140,000 00 



Total $754,000 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 13 



Item Deficiencies. 

Division of Highways: 

For the care, repair and storage, replacement and purchase of 
road-building machinery and tools, the sum of forty-seven 
dollars and thirty-eight cents ...... $47 38 

For the maintenance of state highways and the improvement 
and construction of town ways and certain through routes, 
in accordance with the provisions of existing laws, and for 
the payment of any claims for damages occurring on state 
highways, with the approval of the attorney-general, the sum 
of two hundred sixty-eight dollars and twenty-nine cents . 268 29 

For expenses on account of construction of state highways for 
the year 1917-1918, the sum of ninety-four dollars and forty- 
four cents ......... 94 44 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands: 
For the maintenance and improvement of commonwealth prop- 
erty under the control of the division, the sum of forty-four 
hundred forty-one dollars and twenty cents . . . $4,441 20 

Chapter 502, Acts of 1921, in addition to the general appro- 
priation act making appropriations to supplement certain 
items contained therein, and for certain new activities and 
projects is, in part, as follows : — 

Service of the Department of Public Works. 
Item 

Registration of Motor Vehicles: 

584 For personal services, a sum not exceeding seventy-five hun- 

dred dollars, from receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund, 
the same to be in addition to any amount heretofore appro- 
priated for the purpose ....... $7,500 00 

585 For services other than personal, including traveling expenses, 

purchase of necessary supplies, equipment and materials, 
including cartage and storage of the same, and for work inci- 
dental to the registration and licensing of owners of motor 
vehicles, a sum not exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars, 
from the receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund, the same 
to be in addition to any amount heretofore appropriated for 

the purpose 2,500 00 

28c Item five hundred and eighty-seven of chapter two hundred 
and three of the general appropriation act is hereby amended 
by striking out said item and inserting in place thereof the 
following: For the care of snow on highways, as provided by 
section eleven of chapter eighty-four of the General Laws, a 
sum not exceeding fifty thousand dollars, from receipts in the 
Motor Vehicle Fees Fund. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands: 
607a For making rail connections with the property of the common- 
wealth at East Boston, as authorized by chapter four hun- 
dred and ninety-four of the acts of the present year, a sum 
not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars, the same to be 
paid from the Port of Boston Fund ..... $100,000 00 



14 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Item 

6076 For the State's part of the expense of establishing a public res- 
ervation at Good Harbor Beach in the city of Gloucester, a 
sum not exceeding five hundred dollars .... $500 00 

Section 3. The treasurer and receiver-general is hereby authorized 
and directed to transfer the balance of forty-nine thousand one hundred 
twenty-three dollars and forty-three cents, remaining to the credit of a 
fund known as the Compensation Fund for Boston Harbor, to the Port 
of Boston Fund established by chapter six hundred and sixty-three of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and twelve. 

Expenditures. 

Summary of expenditures by the Division during the fiscal 
year ending Nov. 30, 1921: — 

For construction of State highways, under chapter 81, 
General Laws $2,047,865 85 

For maintenance of State highways, from Motor Vehicle 
Fees Fund, under chapter 81, General Laws, section 13 . 2,265,377 23 

For maintenance of State highways from revenue appro- 
priations, under chapter 81, General Laws, section 13 . 367,697 00 

For maintenance and improvement of town and county 
ways, under chapter 90, General Laws, section 34 as 
amended 765,303 76 

For construction and repair of ways not State highways 
in certain towns, under chapter 81, General Laws, sec- 
tion 23 74,533 24 

For highways in the five western counties, under General 
Acts of 1915, chapter 221 381,090 53 

For repair and improvement of public ways, exclusive of 
State highways, in certain towns, under chapter 81, 
General Laws, sections 26-29, 31 and amendment . . 361,523 95 

For maintenance and improvement of public ways, ex- 
clusive of State highways, in certain towns, under Gen- 
eral Acts of 1918, chapter 155 20,318 27 

For the construction and maintenance of a State highway 
in Hingham, under General Acts of 1916, chapter 213, 
and Acts of 1921, chapter 138 271 79 

For the construction and improvement of the Holland 
Road in Holland and Brimfield, under Special Acts of 
1919, chapter 232 2,096 58 

For the construction and improvement of a highway be- 
tween Holden and the Wachusett Mountain State Res- 
ervation, under Special Acts of 1919, chapter 233 . . 3,504 90 

For the improvement of the highway between Westbor- 
ough and the village of North Grafton, under General 
Acts of 1919, chapter 335 4,000 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 15 

For the construction and improvement of the highway 
from North Brookfield to New Braintree, under General 
Acts of 1919, chapter 336 $193 25 

For the further improvement of a highway in Hubbardston 
and Rutland, under General Acts of 1919, chapter 337 . 15,138 11 

For the construction of a State highway in Holyoke, under 
General Acts of 1919, chapter 338 48,119 61 

For the further improvement of a section of State highway 
in Dracut and Methuen, under General Acts of 1919, 
chapter 340 20,000 00 

For the construction of a State highway in Norton, under 
General Acts of 1919, chapter 348 19,861 33 

For the construction and improvement of the Clinton- 
West Boylston road, in Clinton, under Acts of 1920, 
chapter 520 29,661 03 

For the construction and improvement of a highway in 
Holden, under Acts of 1920, chapter 521 . . . . 19,306 53 

For the construction and improvement of a highway in 
Templeton, under Acts of 1920, chapter 522 .. . 94 52 

For the improvement of the main highway in Westbor- 
ough, under Acts of 1920, chapter 536 ... 14,000 00 

For the construction and improvement of highway in 
Chester, Middlefield, Peru and Hinsdale, under Acts 
of 1920, chapter 5Q6 5,971 13 

For the construction of a highway in Blandford, Otis, 
Monterey and Great Barrington, under Acts of 1920, 
chapter 571 17,326 24 

For the maintenance and operation of the bridge over Mer- 
rimack River between Newburyport and Salisbury, 
under Acts of 1912, chapter 716 7,253 88 

For the maintenance and operation of the bridge over 
Taunton Great River at Brightman Street in Fall River, 
under Acts of 1912, chapter 717 16,863 57 

For State aid in keeping certain highways open during the 
winter months, under chapter 84, General Laws, sec- 
tion 11 47,333 83 

For the regulation of advertising signs and devices within 
the public view, under chapter 93, General Laws, sec- 
tions 29-33 6,175 72 

For the suppression of gypsy and brown-tail moths and 
elm-leaf beetles on State highways 15,000 00 

For the care, repair and storage, replacement and pur- 
chase of road-building machinery and tools . . . x 326,166 89 

For general expenses, under Acts of 1921, chapter 203 . 60,880 15 



Total $6,962,928 89 

1 Includes first appropriation made in 1920. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Co-operative Work — Supervision of Expenditures. 
The Division has supervised the expenditures during the 
year by cities, towns and counties, under section 26 of chapter 
81 of the General Laws, as amended by section 1 of chapter 
120 of the Acts of 1921, x and under section 34 of chapter 90 
of the General Laws, as amended by section 1 of chapter 112 
of the Acts of 1921, 2 of approximately $2,040,347 for co-opera- 
tive work, in repairing, maintaining and improving certain 
public ways, and for other road work for which the towns and 
cities made contributions. All such work was carried out in 
conformity with contracts, specifications and plans approved 
by the Division. 

Petitions, Meetings and Hearings. 

In addition to the regular weekly meetings of the Division 
throughout the year, numerous hearings and conferences have 
been held, including the annual meeting and hearing in the 
several counties in the Commonwealth, for the open discussion 
of questions relative to the public ways, as required by sec- 
tion 1 of chapter 81 of the General Laws; hearings on petitions 
for the relocation of street railway tracks in Andover, Swansea, 
Marion, Mattapoisett, Wareham, Lynn and Winchester; ap- 
peals from the action taken by the registrar of motor vehicles 
in the suspension or revocation of certain licenses to operate 
motor vehicles; and on the matter of outdoor advertising. 

Petitions were received and contracts signed during the 
year, as follows : — 







Petitions. 


Contracts. 




12 


27 


Work under section 34, chapter 90, General Laws, as amended 


90 


143 


Work under section 26, chapter 81, General Laws, as amended 


122 


111 




- 


15 


Totals 


224 


296 



» Printed on pages 86, 87. 
2 Printed on page 70. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 17 



GENERAL STATEMENT AS TO SURVEYS, PLANS, ESTIMATES 
AND OTHER WORK DURING THE YEAR. 

State Highways. — During the year ending Nov. 30, 1921, the 
Division completed work on about 46.72 miles of State high- 
way, portions of which were laid out in 1920. Construction 
was commenced, but not completed, on over 16 miles of road 
in 10 cities and towns. Layouts were made of 39.587 miles of 
State highway in 26 cities and towns. The total length of State 
highways at the end of the year was 1,393.548 miles. 

Surveys, Estimates and Designs. — During the year prelimi- 
nary surveys, plans and estimates were made on contemplated 
State highways in 50 towns covering a distance of 79 miles. 
Surveys, plans and estimates were made for resurfacing or 
reconstruction in 29 towns covering a distance of 44.37 miles. 
Lines and grades for construction work on State highways 
were made in 37 towns covering a distance of 68.55 miles, 
and for resurfacing and reconstruction in 19 towns for a dis- 
tance of 22.80 miles. Final surveys were made on completed 
State highways in 34 towns for a distance of 63.93 miles, for 
resurfacing or reconstruction in 13 towns for a distance of 
37.50 miles, and on roads other than State highways in 26 
towns for a distance of 24.92 miles. Under section 23 of 
chapter 81 of the General Laws, and section 34 of chapter 90 
of the General Laws as amended, and for roads to be con- 
structed by the towns, surveys, plans and estimates have been 
made in 72 towns for a distance of 59.37 miles. 

Lines and grades for construction have been made in 77 
towns for a distance of 58.15 miles. 

Under chapter 221, General Acts of 1915, and for work under 
special acts, surveys, plans and estimates have been made in 
9 towns for a distance of 12.63 miles, and lines and grades for 
construction have been made in 11 towns for a distance of 
18.06 miles. 

Layout plans have been made in 26 towns covering a distance 
of 39.587 miles. Plans to accompany decrees for street rail- 
way locations on State highways have been made in 5 towns. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Roads constructed in 1921. — Construction has been com- 
pleted on 47.72 miles of State highway, 2.30 miles of highways 
under the provisions of section 23 of chapter 81 of the General 
Laws, 85.75 miles of highways under the provisions of section 
34 of chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended, and 21.61 
miles of highways under the provisions of special acts, making 
a total of 157.38 miles completed during the year. 

Of the above roads completed this year, .97 of a mile was of 
water-bound macadam; 33.30 miles were of gravel; 15.10 miles 
were of bituminous concrete; 61.64 miles were of bituminous 
macadam; 3.94 miles were of water-bound macadam with an 
oil or tar surface applied; 6.18 miles were of reinforced con- 
crete; 15.34 miles were of cement concrete; 19.67 miles were 
of gravel with an oil surface applied; and 1.13 miles were earth 
roads, that is, surfaced with the best available material; .11 
of a mile was of granite block. 

Trees on State Highways. — During the last seventeen years 
45,607 trees have been planted on the borders of State high- 
ways, of which 887 were planted this year, the Division con- 
tinuing its policy of planting quick-growing trees and hedges 
to replace guard rails. 

Permits. — There were 1,117 permits issued during the year 
for opening or occupying State highways for various purposes. 

Resurfacing and Widening. — During the year 3.85 miles of 
State highway were resurfaced without widening, 5.48 miles 
were widened but not resurfaced, and 20.13 miles were re- 
surfaced and widened. These figures are for completed work. 
There is uncompleted work in various stages on a number of 
miles of road where the work will be completed next year. 

Engineering Advice to Municipal Authorities. ■ — The Division 
furnished, without charge, engineering advice to cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth, in accordance with the provisions 
of section 1 of chapter 81 of the General Laws. 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 19 



STATE HIGHWAYS. 
Chapter 81, General Laws, section 4, provides that — 

If county commissioners, aldermen or selectmen adjudge that public 
necessity and convenience require that the commonwealth lay out and 
take charge of a new or existing way as a highway in whole or in part, 
in their county, city or town, they may apply, by a written petition, to 
the division, requesting that said way be laid out and taken charge of 
by the commonwealth. 

The following petitions under chapter 81 aforesaid have 
been submitted during the year: — 

Selectmen of Woburn. — Section of Salem Street from Pine Street to 

Beach Street. Received Feb. 24, 1921. 
Mayor and Aldermen of Haverhill. — Section of Broadway from 

North Broadway to the Methuen line. Received Feb. 25, 1921. 
Selectmen of Lakeville. — Section from the Middleborough line to the 

State highway; section of Bedford Street to the Rochester line; and 

section of Lakeside Avenue from Bedford Street to the Freetown 

line. Received March 15, 1921. 
Selectmen of Canton. — Section of Washington Street from the Milton 

line to the village of Ponkapoag. Received May 31, 1921. 
Mayor and Aldermen of Waltham. — Section of Lexington Street 

from Lake Street to the Lexington line. Received June 15, 1921. 
Selectmen of Lanesborough. — Section of the Pittsfield- Williams- 
town road from the Pittsfield line to the New Ashford line. Received 

July 1, 1921. 
Selectmen of Williamstown. — Section of the River Road from the 

village of South Williamstown to the New Ashford line. Received 

July 1, 1921. 
Mayor and Aldermen of North Adams. — Section of the Hodge Cross 

Road from Church Street to State Street. Received Sept. 13, 1921. 
Selectmen of Wareham. — Approach to new bridge over Cohasset 

Narrows. Received Sept. 13, 1921. 
Selectmen of Bourne. — Approach to new bridge over Cohasset 

Narrows. Received Sept. 15, 1921. 
Selectmen of Egremont. — Section of Great Barrington road from the 

village of South Egremont to the Great Barrington line. Received 

Oct. 21, 1921. 
Mayor and Aldermen of Haverhill. — Section of Kenoza Street from 

the Amesbury road to Kenoza Avenue. Received Oct. 25, 1921. 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



The expenditures during the year in various counties for the 
construction of State highways were : — 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Essex . 

Franklin 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Suffolk 

Worcester 



$20,704 20 

66,319 16 

41,488 11 

402,593 73 

168,143 98 

310,626 95 

301,977 12 

68,397 61 

54,226 63 

3,221 82 

610,166 54 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow 



Barnstable . 
Bourne . 
Provincetown 



Dalton . 

Egremont 

Hinsdale 

Lanesborough 

Sheffield 

Washington 

Windsor 



Taunton 



Andover 
Dan vers 
Lynnfield 
Middleton . 
North Andover 
Peabody 
Saugus . 
Topsfield . 



Barnstable County. 



Berkshire County. 



Bristol County. 
Essex County. 



$12,475 11 


67 88 


8,161 21 


2,454 13 


18,212 19 


627 67 


11,554 85 


446 99 


418 45 


32,604 88 



41,488 11 



4,602 97 

17,164 88 

119,008 86 

68,883 83 

702 03 

114,086 96 

76,394 34 

1,749 86 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



21 



Franklin County. 



Conway 
Deerfield 
Greenfield 
Shelburne 



Amherst 
Cummington 
Huntington . 
Ware 



Ashby . 

Billerica 

Groton . 

Littleton 

Waltham 

Woburn 



Braintree 
Holbrook 
Quincy . 
Wrentham 



Hingham 
Kingston 
Norwell 



Boston 



Barre . 
Leicester 
Mendon 
Northbridge 
Oakham 
Oxford . 
Shrewsbury . 
Templeton . 
Upton . 
Uxbridge 
Westminster 
Winchendon 

Total . 



Hampshire County. 



Middlesex County. 



Norfolk County. 



Plymouth County. 



Suffolk County. 
Worcester County. 



$811 62 


300 78 


66,812 63 


100,218 95 


541 88 


172,471 54 


76,290 80 


61,322 73 


55,084 00 


8,561 28 


155,475 70 


43,859 89 


30,695 84 


8,300 41 


23,464 12 


269 98 


44,447 52 


215 99 


29,487 48 


612 73 


24,126 42 



3,221 82 



5,580 08 


79,689 97 


35,759 36 


12,230 57 


42 15 


203,146 69 


5 56 


45,265 49 


99,907 11 


51,460 03 


5 86 


77,073 67 


$2,047,865 85 



22 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Construction and Resurfacing of State Highways. 

(Chapter 81, General Laws.) 

The following contracts were entered into during the year 
for the construction and resurfacing of State highways in 
various municipalities: — 

Braintree. 

Feb. 23, 1921, contract made with the Norfolk County com- 
missioners for the resurfacing of 260 feet of State highway on 
Quincy Avenue at the approach to the bridge over Monatiquot 
River, the surface consisting of bituminous macadam 26 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $2,243. 

Work completed July 19, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $2,243. 

East Brook field-Spencer. 

March 8, 1921, contract made with Hinman & Rudiger of 
Sturbridge for the surfacing of 2,245 feet of State highway in 
East Brookfield and 2,550 feet of State highway in Spencer, 
the surface consisting of bituminous macadam 20 feet wide. 
The proposal amounted to $49,056.25. 

Work completed Aug. 9, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $58,600.46. 

Palmer. 

March 8, 1921, contract made with Willard C. Tannatt, Jr., 
of Easthampton for the surfacing of 9,479 feet of State high- 
way, the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet wide. 
The proposal amounted to $95,729.75. 

Work completed Oct. 18, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $100,009.61. 

East Brookfield. 

March 8, 1921, contract made with Carlo Bianchi & Co., Inc., 
of Framingham for the surfacing of 5,241 feet of State highway, 
the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $49,755. 

Work completed July 5, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $56,679. 




0> 

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 23 

Ashby. 

April 26, 1921, contract made with the Lane Construction 
Corporation of Meriden, Conn., for the construction of 6,602 
feet of State highway, the surface consisting of bituminous 
macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $37,098.50. 

Work completed Aug. 16, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $44,638.05. 

Upton. 

May 3, 1921, contract with the R. H. Newell Company of 
Uxbridge for the construction of 8,830 feet of State highway, 
the surface consisting of bituminous concrete 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $67,996. 

Work completed Sept. 27, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $80,945.62. 

Waltham. 

May 10, 1921, contract made with Samuel O. Hoyt of Hol- 
yoke for the construction of 5,025 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam varying from 21 
to 24 feet in width. The proposal amounted to $44,057. 

Work completed Aug. 23, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $24,870.04. 

Quincy. 

May 24, 1921, contract made with A. G. Tomasello & Son 
of Boston for the construction of 2,950 feet of State highway, 
the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $31,906.25. 

Work completed Aug. 30, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $36,011.77. 

Oxford. 

May 24, 1921, contract made with D'Onfro Brothers, Inc., 
of Leominster for the construction of 3.2 miles of State high- 
way, the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet wide. 
The proposal amounted to $138,038.15. 

Work completed Oct. 25, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $124,870.70. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Andover. 

June 8, 1921, contract made with James H. Fannon of 
Somerville for the surfacing of 3,235 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $14,980. 

Work completed July 26, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $14,728.07. 

Mendon-Uxbridge. 

June 8, 1921, contract made with J. H. Fannon of Somerville 
for the construction of 4,845 feet of State highway in Mendon 
and 5,500 feet of State highway in Uxbridge, the surface con- 
sisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $109,088.25. 

Work completed Nov. 22, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $70,666.73. 

Leicester. 

June 8, 1921, contract made with Charles E. Home of Mill- 
bury for the surfacing of 4,378 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet wide. The pro- 
posal amounted to $61,058. 

Work completed Dec. 20, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $60,292.18. 

Stoughton. 

June 21, 1921, contract made with Carlo Bianchi & Co., 
Inc., of Framingham for the surfacing of 11,556 feet of State 
highway, the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $95,364.25. 

Work completed Nov. 29, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $83,389.14. 

Lanesborough, New Ashford and Williamstoivn. 

June 21, 1921, contract made with the Rendle-Stoddard 

Company of Chelsea for the construction of the 12 reinforced 

concrete bridges on the State highway in Lanesborough, New 

Ashford and Williamstown. The proposal amounted to 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 25 

$42,005.50. On Sept. 22, 1921, said contractors were notified 
to discontinue all work under said contract, the chief engineer 
having certified in writing that the work called for by the 
contract had been unnecessarily and unreasonably delayed. 
Expenditure during 1921, $45,054.55. 

Watertown. 

June 28, 1921, contract made with Thomas J. McCue of 
Watertown for the surfacing of 4,486 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 27 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $30,498.30. 

Work completed Sept. 27, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $37,432.60. 

Winchester and Woburn. 

July 5, 1921, contract made with Powers Brothers of Brock- 
ton for the surfacing of 3.042 miles of State highway, the sur- 
face consisting of bituminous macadam varying from 18 to 20 
feet in width. The proposal amounted to $106,098.10. 

Work completed Dec. 30, 1921. 

Expenditure during 192.1, $102,044.72. 

Middleton and Danvers. 

July 5, 1921, contract made with Fred E. Ellis of Melrose 
for the construction of 1.9 miles of State highway, the surface 
consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $70,969.50. 

Work completed Dec. 20, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $60,663.36. 

Brookfield and West Brookfield. 

July 19, 1921, contract made with the Middlesex Construc- 
tion Company of Medford for the surfacing of 8,880 feet of 
State highway, the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 
feet wide. The proposal amounted to $101,555.90. 

Work completed Nov. 22, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $95,308.38. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Winchendon and Templeton. 

July 19, 1921, contract made with the Lane Construction 
Corporation of Meriden, Conn., for the construction of 5.39 
miles of State highway, the surface consisting of bituminous 
macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $209,028.50. 

Work about half completed. 

Expenditure during 1921, $99,120.27. 

Littleton. 

Aug. 2, 1921, contract made with Thomas J. McCue of 
Watertown for the surfacing of 7,104 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 20 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $62,813.20. 

Work completed Nov. 15, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $51,285.74. 

North Adams. 

Aug. 2, 1921, contract made with Fred T. Ley & Co., 
Inc., of Springfield for the surfacing of 8,650 feet of State 
highway, the surface consisting of cement concrete 20 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $70,623.75. 

Work completed Dec. 6, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $69,144.11. 

Littleton. 

Aug. 16, 1921, contract made with Thomas J. McCue of 
Watertown for the surfacing of 8,596 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 20 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $47,174.12. 

Work completed Nov. 29, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $52,311.39. 

Lynn field. 
Aug. 23, 1921, contract made with the Hanscom Construc- 
tion Company of Boston for the construction of 3,052 feet of 
State highway on Salem Street, the surface consisting of bitu- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 27 

minous macadam varying from 18 to 24 feet in width. The 
proposal amounted to $45,941.50. 

Work completed Jan. 10, 1922. 

Expenditure during 1921, $17,091.87. 

Egremont. 

Sept. 27, 1921, contract made with D. S. McGrath, Inc., of 
Adams for the construction of 4,328 feet of State highway, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $36,422.45. 

Expenditure during 1921, $5,321.10. 

Bernardston. 

Oct. 13, 1921, contract made with the Lane Construction 
Corporation of Meriden, Conn., for the construction of 1,750 
feet of State highway, the surface consisting of bituminous 
macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $14,020.70. 

Expenditure during 1921, $951.79. 

Danvers and Tops field. 

Nov. 1, 1921, contract made with Thomas J. McCue of 
Watertown for the construction of 15,889 feet of State high- 
way in Danvers, and 18,547 feet of State highway in Topsfield, 
on the Newburyport Turnpike, the surface on 8,100 feet con- 
sisting of cement concrete 18 feet wide, and the surface on 
26,336 feet consisting of bituminous macadam varying from 18 
to 24 feet. The proposal amounted to $273,523.90. 

Expenditure during 1921, $2,577.75. 

Boston. 

Nov. 1, 1921, contract made with J. C. Coleman & Sons of 
Boston for the construction of 1,412 feet of State highway on 
Washington Street in the West Roxbury district. This con- 
tract provides for the construction of two roadways, one road- 
way to be surfaced with bituminous concrete and the other with 
bituminous macadam. The proposal amounted to $47,308.25. 

Expenditure during 1921, $2,610.35. 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Maintenance of State Highways (from Motor Vehicle 

Fees Fund). 

Section 13 of chapter 81 of the General Laws provides: — 

State highways shall be maintained and kept in good repair and con- 
dition by the division at the expense of the commonwealth. The division 
shall keep all state highways reasonably clear of brush, shall cause suitable 
shade trees to be planted thereon if practicable, and may establish and 
maintain watering troughs upon said highways. 

The expenditures during the year in various counties were : — 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Bristol 
Dukes 
Essex . 
Franklin 
Hampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Nantucket 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Suffolk 
Worcester . 



$208,462 67 

261,881 50 

43,610 49 

28,357 57 

82,991 82 

209,382 77 

181,759 72 

48,005 84 

400,197 35 

3,326 44 

143,586 59 

82,514 58 

7,601 11 

550,324 42 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow : — 



Barnstable County. 



Barnstable 

Bourne . 

Brewster 

Chatham 

Dennis . 

Eastham 

Falmouth 

Harwich 

Mashpee 

Orleans 



$6,372 14 
11,507 40 
3,372 14 
4,243 24 
2,340 56 
40,349 21 
9,058 90 
2,101 27 
2,378 85 
1,638 90 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



29 



Provincetown 
Sandwich 
Truro . 
Wellfleet 
Yarmouth 



Adams . 

Becket . 

Cheshire 

Clarksburg 

Dalton . 

Egremont 

Florida . 

Great Barrington 

Hancock 

Hinsdale 

Lanesborough 

Lee 

Lenox . 

New Ashford 

New Marlborough 

North Adams 

Pittsfield 

Richmond 

Savoy . 

Sheffield 

Stockbridge 

Washington 

Williamstown 

Windsor 



Acushnet 
Attleboro 
Berkley 
Dartmouth . 
Dighton 
Easton . 
Fairhaven . 
Fall River . 
Freetown 
Mansfield . 
North Attleborough 
Norton . 
Raynham 



Berkshire County. 



Bristol County. 



$5,490 37 


3,217 85 


74,522 49 


39,002 23 


2,867 12 


1,003 33 


34,094 98 


7,382 37 


4,435 05 


2,920 15 


4,103 25 


8,770 78 


5,090 88 


24,158 55 


2,286 59 


1,210 15 


8,565 23 


9,956 43 


66 27 


100 66 


85,197 75 


35,059 62 


4,905 06 


3,755 10 


5,943 85 


2,987 69 


842 40 


8,055 10 


990 26 


1,342 45 


4,111 51 


531 32 


2,049 50 


2,509 25 


59 16 


1,483 93 


44 47 


1,401 44 


188 58 


1,766 36 


1,258 51 


2,495 20 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Rehoboth $5,000 84 

Seekonk 3,755 51 

Somerset 3,427 47 

Swansea 3,845 82 

Taunton 5,445 46 

Westport 2,893 71 

Dukes County. 

Chilmark 16,414 87 

Edgartown 345 71 

Gay Head . • 1,435 18 

Oak Bluffs 279 88 

Tisbury 874 30 

West Tisbury 9,007 63 

Essex County. 

Amesbury . 1,692 10 

Andover 19,854 17 

Beverly 8,418 66 

Danvers 284 34 

Essex 1,985 20 

Gloucester 3,477 19 

Groveland 297 30 

Hamilton 1,062 58 

Haverhill 3,927 22 

Ipswich 3,701 02 

Lawrence 268 14 

Lynn 3,418 62 

Lynnfield 98 51 

Merrimac 2,449 32 

Methuen 2,277 54 

Middleton 1,437 78 

Newbury 4,539 30 

Newburyport 1,170 05 

North Andover 4,378 22 

Rockport 1,147 68 

Rowley 2,512 79 

Salem 2,702 63 

Salisbury 4,294 16 

Saugus 3,034 05 

Swampscott 891 78 

Topsfield 9 75 

Wenham 1,054 77 

West Newbury 2,606 95 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



31 



Franklin County. 



Ashfield 

Bernardston 

Buckland 

Charlemont 

Colrain 

Conway 

Deerfield 

Erving . 

Gill 

Greenfield 

Montague 

'Northfield 

Orange . 

Shelburne 

Sunderland 

Whately 



Agawam 

Blandford . 

Brimfield 

Chester 

Chicopee 

East Longmeadow 

Holyoke 

Monson 

Palmer . 

Russell . 

Wales . 

West Springfield 

Westfield . 

Wilbraham . 



Amherst 

Belchertown 

Cummington 

Easthampton 

Goshen 

Granby 

Hadley . 

Hatfield 

Huntington 

Northampton 



Hampden County. 



Hampshire County. 



$1,259 77 


90,443 07 


3,224 19 


13,999 71 


1,389 70 


4,231 93 


6,190 15 


5,749 56 


10 83 


50,504 25 


12,136 35 


3,472 09 


7,070 36 


5,720 06 


2,117 60 


1,863 15 


2,068 12 


3,707 49 


3,235 04 


9,494 89 


4,581 86 


953 40 


2,608 99 


961 54 


18,735 47 


8,873 36 


850 18 


3,025 41 


16,846 29 


5,817 68 


4,311 37 


1,976 57 


1,290 48 


1,045 37 


1,773 79 


4,871 83 


2,393 67 


1,500 15 


8,280 09 


1,945 92 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



South Hadley $5,714 04 

Southampton 1,790 86 

Ware 7,140 43 

Williamsburg 3,971 27 



Middlesex County. 



Acton . 

Arlington 

Ashby . 

Ashland 

Ayer 

Bedford 

Billerica 

Boxborough 

Burlington 

Chelmsford 

Concord 

Dracut . 

Framingham 

Groton . 

Holliston 

Hudson 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Lowell . 

Maiden 

Marlborough 

Medford 

Melrose 

Natick . 

Newton 

North Reading 

Pepperell 

Reading 

Shirley . 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Sudbury 

Tewksbury 

Townsend 

Tyngsborougl 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Wayland 



11,317 03 

280 80 

2,497 95 

1,973 77 

2,040 25 

1,330 20 

4,790 72, 

1,871 71 

3,026 34 

6,292 67 

1,863 21 

3,385 76 

2,044 78 

1,557 75 

1,922 11 

1,144 79 

2,832 08 

1,421 30 

143,459 06 

4,797 67 

26 65 

4,450 90 

603 26 

443 98 

1,556 03 

158 35 

2,149 03 

2,576 99 

5,535 64 

1,450 88 

479 95 

2,627 29 

1,573 94 

1,803 78 

3,645 48 

6,382 70 

23 34 

40,825 21 

1,162 46 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



33 



Westford 

Weston 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Woburn 

Nantucket County. 
Nantucket 



$7,157 72 

981 15 

1,341 25 

45,461 83 

67,929 59 



3,326 44 



Norfolk County. 



Avon . 

Bellingham 

Braintree 

Canton 

Cohasset 

Dedham 

Dover . 

Foxborough 

Franklin 

Holbrook 

Milton . 

Needham 

Norfolk 

Norwood 

Plain ville 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Sharon . 

Stoughton 

Walpole 

Wellesley 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Wrentham 



1,112 80 
1,258 51 
4,921 70 
3,695 69 

313 43 
1,845 70 
1,469 68 

795 78 
1,208 89 

696 62 

641 59 

970 09 
1,332 97 
2,330 58 
3,230 25 
1,796 39 
2,718 75 

338 69 

91,738 62 

4,779 37 

382 26 
1,529 63 
8,569 87 
5,908 73 



Plymouth County. 

Abington 4,088 93 

Bridgewater 5,544 07 

Brockton 2,225 15 

Duxbury 4,105 44 

East Bridgewater 2,476 18 

Hanover 4,472 32; 

Hingham 2,910 95 

Kingston 2,575 83 



34 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Lakeville $3,645 08 

Marion . • 1,070 79 

Marshfield 6,616 27 

Mattapoisett 1,250 14 

Middleborough 6,629 62 

Norwell 141 80 

Pembroke : 3,114 07 

Plymouth 8,647 43 

Rochester 1,878 33 

Rockland 4,977 86 

Scituate 6,487 20 

Wareham 6,001 97 

West Bridgewater 1,742 27 

Whitman 1,912 88 

Suffolk County. 

Boston 937 69 

Chelsea 1,768 47 

Revere 4,894 95 

Worcester County. 

Ashburnham 7,040 22 

Athol 2,443 20 

Auburn 4,222 51 

Barre 4,154 01 

Blackstone 2,247 56 

Brookfield 32,980 86 

Charlton 9,103 53 

Douglas 1,409 60 

Dudley 3,290 02 

East Brookfield 98,383 67 

Fitchburg 1,595 51 

Gardner 1,924 83 

Grafton 6,621 76 

Hardwick 1,098 64 

Harvard 1,512 19 

Holden 3,779 75 

Hopedale 279 68 

Lancaster 2,540 48 

Leicester 95,591 64 

Leominster 4,076 67 

Lunenburg 62,420 34 

Mendon 722 00 

Milford 3,924 02 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 35 

Millbury $3,184 54 

Millville 2,698 60 

New Braintree 85 55 

North Brookfield 2,212 25 

Northborough 3,115 13 

Northbridge 1,125 01 

Oakham 1,146 47 

Oxford 4,429 79 

Paxton 3,584 95 

Petersham 4,860 79 

Phillipston 1,550 10 

Princeton 1,439 27 

Royalston 20 79 

Rutland 2,164 48 

Shrewsbury 7,670 32 

Southborough 1,163 46 

Southbridge 1,324 68 

Spencer 34,053 46 

Sterling 5,584 55 

Sturbridge 2,261 42 

Sutton 3,054 96 

Templeton 4,666 97 

Upton . 2,133 98 

Uxbridge 4,242 40 

Warren 4,407 33 

Webster 1,192 64 

West Boylston 1,546 64 

West Brookfield 73,453 94 

Westborough 1,543 68 

Westminster 5,807 29 

Winchendon 8,533 53 

Worcester 4,702 47 

Total * $2,252,002 87 

1 To this amount should be added items totalling $13,374.36 for tree planting and traffic census. 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Maintenance of State Highways (from Revenue Appro- 
priations). 

(Section 13 of chapter 81 of the General Laws. x ) 

The expenditures during the year in various counties were : — 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Bristol 
Dukes 
Essex . 
Franklin 
Hampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Nantucket 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Suffolk 
Worcester . 



$17,565 05 
35,359 20 
30,467451 

2,679 97 
52,438 19 
16,925 33 
24,398 60 
13,719 39 
44,349 36 

1,802 23 
27,133 02 
18,176 60 

5,785 28 
76,897 27 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 



Barnstable . 

Bourne . 

Brewster 

Chatham 

Dennis . 

Eastham 

Falmouth 

Harwich 

Mashpee 

Orleans 

Provincetown 

Sandwich 

Truro . 

Wellfleet . 

Yarmouth, North j 

Yarmouth, South j 



Barnstable County. 



$3,177 51 

1,329 25 

847 25 

564 20 

1,168 39 

24 87 

1,962 78 

1,664 74 

787 37 

472 97 

1,693 23 

889 88 

1,135 93 

518 33 

1,328 35 



1 Printed on page 28. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 37 



Berkshire County. 

Adams $664 77 

Becket 2,584 61 

Cheshire 2,098 54 

Clarksburg 1,084 00 

Dalton 1,088 85 

Egremont 641 37 

Florida 4,220 20 

Great Barrington 1,091 22 

Hancock 148 94 

Hinsdale 316 55 

Lanesborough ' . . . 736 50 

Lee 3,925 78 

Lenox 3,593 20 

North Adams 5,160 43 

Pittsfield '. 2,449 07 

Richmond 593 25 

Savoy 671 12 

Sheffield 1,738 35 

Stockbridge 1,208 58 

Washington 214 70 

Williamstown 926 37 

Windsor 202 80 

Bristol County. 

Acushnet . 1,074 02 

Attleboro 860 97 

Berkley 1,100 13 

Dartmouth 1,718 02 

Dighton 1,671 49 

Easton 166 00 

Fairhaven 757 46 

Fall River 23 10 

Freetown 260 70 

Mansfield 489 49 

North Attleborough 1,016 05 

Norton 2,888 34 

Raynham 1,016 56 

Rehoboth 4,067 48 

Seekonk 2,161 88 

Somerset 3,679 33 

Swansea 4,375 24 

Taunton 2,260 07 

Westport 881 18 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Dukes County. 

Chilmark 

Edgartown 

Gay Head . . . . 

Oak Bluffs 

Tisbury 

West Tisbury 

Essex County. 

Amesbury 

Andover 

Beverly ■ . 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Groveland 

Hamilton 

Haverhill 

Ipswich 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Merrimac 

Methuen 

Middleton 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

North Andover 

Rockport 

Rowley 

Salem 

Salisbury 

Saugus 

Swampscott 

Wenham 

West Newbury 

Franklin County. 

Ashfield 

Bernardston 

Buckland 

Charlemont 

Colrain 

Conway 

Deerfield 

Erving 

Greenfield 



$665 05 
276 06 
443 60 

1,093 91 

41 10 

160 25 



2,015 25 

3,512 65 

1,948 84 

49 60 

456 90 

579 97 
1,370 04 

353 65 
5,143 69 
4,679 52 

542 68 
3,943 16 
2,196 43 
2,731 15 
46 39 
3,436 01 

754 90 
7,666 60 
1,004 23 
2,311 06 

649 92 
3,416 89 
1,953 68 

190 50 

290 03 
1,194 45 



197 95 

832 35 

1,015 60 

3,973 07 

121 45 

594 33 

1,962 17 

1,216 19 

698 16 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



39 



Montague $1,599 36 

Northfield * . 792 61 

Orange 1,558 19 

Shelburne 1,425 15 

Sunderland 368 15 

Whately 570 60 

Hampden County. 

Agawam 1,813 97 

Blandford 1,074 10 

Brimfield 1,055 95 

Chester 2,536 83 

Chicopee 1,639 01 

East Longmeadow 1,366 76 

Holyoke 926 85 

Monson 299 98 

Palmer 4,421 81 

Russell 3,232 24 

Wales 859 44 

West Springfield 439 60 

Westfield 3,290 80 

Wilbraham 1,441 26 

Hampshire County. 

Amherst 1,326 69 

Belchertown 329 17 

Cummington 407 23 

Easthampton 187 56 

Goshen 328 80 

Granby 1,612 40 

Hadley 1,276 72 

Hatfield 255 27 

Huntington 2,773 99 

Northampton 743 95 

Southampton 25 86 

South Hadley 1,863 07 

Ware 1,508 36 

Williamsburg 1,080 32 

Middlesex County. 

Acton 1,970 11 

Arlington 144 71 

Ashby 1,339 03 

Ashland 1,347 32 

Ayer 538 74 

Bedford 480 01 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Billerica $1,504 15 

Boxborough 1,092 45 

Burlington 1,539 48 

Chelmsford 4,519 73 

Concord 615 42 

Dracut 1,244 58 

Framingham 3,038 56 

Groton 516 66 

Holliston 1,464 28 

Hudson 431 82 

Lexington 571 84 

Lincoln 237 38 

Littleton 2,236 97 

Lowell ■ . 2,407 88 

Maiden 18 50 

Marlborough 1,982 73 

Medford 166 83 

Melrose 103 15 

Natick 617 06 

Newton 71 56 

North Reading 377 31 

Pepperell 753 72 

Reading 446 83 

Shirley 340 13 

Somerville 312 96 

Stoneham 483 50 

Sudbury '. 242 17 

Tewksbury 328 36 

Townsend 982 89 

Tyngsborough 2,573 46 

Watertown 303 14 

Wayland 430 43 

Westford 2,763 45 

Weston 495 07 

Wilmington 709 95 

Winchester 1,351 48 

Woburn 1,253 06 

Nantucket County. 

Nantucket 1,802 23 

Norfolk County. 

Avon 304 61 

Bellingham 1,952 04 

Braintree 1,024 50 

Canton 1,461 29 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



41 



Cohasset 

Dedham 

Dover . 

Foxborough 

Franklin 

Holbrook 

Milton . 



$185 42 
233 45 
468 95 
974 23 

3,349 20 
684 30 
369 08 



Norfolk County. 



Needham 

Norfolk 

Norwood 

Plainville 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Sharon . 

Stoughton 

Walpole 

Wellesley 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Wrentham 



604 15 

355 52 

1,604 61 

2,397 10 

1,188 54 

607 14 

222 32 

977 24 

1,635 37 

272 15 

1,151 06 

2,078 38 

3,032 37 



Plymouth County. 



Abington 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewater 

Hanover 

Hingham 

Kingston 

Lakeville 

Marion 

Marshfield . 

Mattapoisett 

Middleborough 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Scituate 

Wareham 

West Bridgewater 

Whitman 



637 71 

1,263 16 
462 91 
782 60 
574 57 

1,019 52 
339 99 
722 96 

1,289 00 
712 91 

1,207 24 
419 82 

1,999 75 
564 74 

1,310 77 
855 59 
448 20 
677 88 

2,088 01 
308 52 
490 75 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Suffolk County. 

Boston 

Chelsea 

Revere 



Worcester County. 



Athol . 

Auburn 

Ashburnham 

Barre . 

Blackstone 

Brookfleld 

Charlton 

Douglas 

Dudley . 

East Brookfleld 

Fitchburg 

Gardner 

Grafton 

Hardwick 

Harvard 

Holden . 

Hopedale 

Lancaster 

Leicester 

Leominster 

Lunenburg 

Mendon 

Milford 

Millbury 

Millville 

New Braintree 

North Brookfleld 

Northborough 

Northbridge 

Oakham 

Oxford . 

Paxton . 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Princeton 

Rutland 

Shrewsbury 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Spencer 



$890 92 
2,117 17 

2,777 19 



833 00 

4,126 25 

3,258 36 

1,837 88 

1,592 70 

1,446 11 

3,584 57 

520 77 

1,437 61 

374 31 

605 61 

673 44 

3,916 95 

1,299 62 

829 80 

2,161 69 

426 83 

651 42 

3,804 14 

2,120 43 

2,433 67 

444 84 

1,680 90 

867 64 

1,128 11 

123 40 

786 51 

1,047 67 

240 74 

559 57 

1,440 58 

1,003 50 

1,692 15 

139 66 

312 83 

899 90 

1,521 03 

384 72 

174 32 

757 65 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



43 



Sterling 

Sturbridge 

Sutton . 

Templeton 

Upton . 

Uxbridge 

Warren 

Webster 

Westborough 

West Boylston 

West Brookfielcl 

Westminster 

Winchendon 

Worcester . 

Total . 



$3,173 60 


339 31 


1,138 97 


2,084 29 


2,113 14 


2,061 89 


832 77 


652 44 


544 03 


788 65 


664 35 


3,505 00 


3,792 84 


2,064 61 


$367,697 00 



The amounts expended for maintenance of State highways, 
the average expenditure per mile in 1921 for maintenance, the 
average cost per mile per year for each municipality, the 
number of miles under maintenance, and the amounts to be 
assessed upon municipalities for maintenance under 1921 ex- 
penditures are shown in the following table : — 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 









Amounts 


EXPENDED. 






Town or City. 


REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR VEHICLE FEES FUND. 
















Total 


During 


Total. 


Total 


During 


Total. 




to 1921. 


1921. 


to 1921. 


1921. 


Abington 


$9,760 56 


S637 71 


$10,398 27 


$34,444 18 


$4,088 93 


$38,533 11 


Acton . 




23,924 31 


1,970 11 


25,894 42 


209,256 41 


11,317 03 


220,573 44 


Acushnet 




13,671 93 


1,074 02 


14,745 95 


40,652 25 


1,342 45 


41,994 70 


Adams . 




8,591 98 


664 77 


9,256 75 


7,346 11 


1,003 33 


8,349 44 


Agawam 




19,471 28 


1,813 97 


20,785 25 


19,890 61 


2,068 12 


21,958 73 


Amesbury 




14,534 81 


2,015 25 


16,550 06 


8,771 68 


1,692 10 


10,463 78 


Amherst 




7,795 22 


1,326 69 


9,121 91 


12,657 21 


4,311 37 


16,968 58 


Andover 




28,123 67 


3,512 65 


31,636 32 


91,397 52 


19,854 17 


111,251 69 


Arlington 




537 92 


144 71 


682 63 


608 75 


280 80 


889 55 


Ashburnham 




16,628 54 


3,258 36 


19,886 90 


44,540 91 


7,040 22 


51,581 13 


Ash by . 




16,542 37 


1,339 03 


17,881 40 


51,223 36 


2,497 95 


53,721 31 


Ashfield 




4,895 35 


197 95 


5,093 30 


8,884 58 


1,259 77 


10,144 35 


Ashland 




7,822 57 


1,347 32 


9,169 89 


6,527 65 


1,973 77 


8,501 42 


Athol . 




17,674 76 


833 00 


18,507 76 


45,250 29 


2,443 20 


47,693 49 


Attleboro 




15,252 53 


860 97 


16,113 50 


86,616 09 


4,111 51 


90,727 60 


Auburn 




44,682 82 


4,126 25 


48,809 07 


74,133 78 


4,222 51 


78,356 29 


Avon 




716 59 


304 61 


1,021 20 


2,330 05 


1,112 80 


3,442 85 


Ayer 




3,438 68 


538 74 


3,977 42 


4,827 94 


2,040 25 


6,868 19 


Barnstable 




31,682 22 


3,177 51 


34,859 73 


42,311 83 


6,372 14 


48,683 97 


Barre 




17,718 51 


1,837 88 


19,556 39 


29,515 57 


4,154 01 


33,669 58 


Becket . 




41,786 78 


2,584 61 


44,371 39 


242,808 81 


34,094 98 


276,903 79 


Bedford 




6,029 73 


480 01 


6,509 74 


8,018 18 


1,330 20 


9,348 38 


Belchertown 




5,767 53 


329 17 


6,096 70 


6,795 41 


1,976 57 


8,771 98 


Bellingham 




6,320 33 


1,952 04 


8,272 37 


8,682 76 


1,258 51 


9,941 27 


Berkley 




2,771 42 


1,100 13 


3,271 55 


2,603 11 


531 32 


3,134 43 


Bernardston 




9,881 35 


832 35 


10,713 70 


50,178 42 


90,443 07 


140,621 49 


Beverly 




59,056 25 


1,948 84 


61,005 09 


161,319 33 


8,418 66 


169,737 99 


Billerica 




4,998 77 


1,504 15 


6,502 92 


5,760 62 


4,790 72 


10,551 34 


Blackstone 




14,492 89 


1,392 70 


16,085 59 


13,570 70 


2,247 65 


15,818 35 


Blandford 




2,079 06 


1,074 10 


3,153 16 


9,863 15 


3,707 49 


13,570 64 


Boston . 




12,901 81 


890 92 


13,792 73 


75,256 15 


937 69 


76,193 84 


Bourne . 




18,930 09 


1,329 25 


20,259 34 


48,798 44 


11,507 40 


60,305 84 


Boxborough 




9,854 34 


1,092 45 


10,946 79 


12,072 53 


1,871 71 


13,944 24 


Braintree 




5,071 31 


1,024 50 


6,095 81 


14,226 27 


4,921 70 


19,147 97 


Brewster 




18,995 72 


847 25 


19,842 97 


44,224 18 


3,372 14 


47,596 32 


Bridgewater 




9,450 25 


1,263 16 


10,713 41 


31,928 70 


5,544 07 


37,472 77 


Brimfield 




7,503 72 


1,055 95 


8,559 67 


17,648 96 


3,235 04 


20,884 00 


Brockton 




16,909 73 


462 91 


17,372 64 


31,381 43 


2,225 15 


33,606 58 


Brookfield 




21,005 92 


1,446 11 


22,452 03 


45,104 89 


32,980 86 


78,085 75 


Buckland 




18,866 47 


1,015 60 


19,882 07 


47,242 40 


3,224 19 


50,466 59 


Burlington 




14,259 99 


1,539 48 


15,799 47 


13,985 38 


3,026 34 


17,011 72 


Canton . 




15,474 85 


1,461 29 


16,936 14 


56,810 69 


3,695 69 


60,506 38 


Charlemont 




20,704 07 


3,973 07 


24,677 14 


39,094 05 


13,999 71 


53,093 76 


Charlton 




23,643 80 


3,584 57 


27,228 37 


30,335 11 


9,103 53 


39,438 64 


Chatham 




15,696 84 


564 20 


16,261 04 


35,471 98 


4,243 24 


39,715 22 


Chelmsford 




26,634 13 


4,519 73 


31,153 86 


34,103 76 


6,292 67 


40,396 43 


Chelsea . 




9,624 06 


2,117 17 


11,741 23 


20,435 07 


1,768 47 


22,203 54 


Cheshire 




18,611 24 


2,098 54 


20,709 78 


20,692 64 


7,382 37 


28,075 01 


Chester . 




21,342 56 


2,536 83 


23,879 39 


32,683 50 


9,494 89 


42,178 39 


Chicopee 




30,353 83 


1,639 01 


31,992 84 


54,149 99 


4,581 86 


58,731 85 


Chilmark 




10,347 86 


665 05 


11,012 91 


20,399 17 


16,414 57 


36,814 04 


Clarksburg 




6,878 94 


1,084 00 


7,962 94 


9,629 52 


4,435 05 


14,064 57 


Cohasset 




8,724 08 


185 42 


8,909 50 


46,526 47 


313 43 


46,839 90 


Colrain . 




5,001 42 


121 45 


5,122 87 


6,510 86 


1,389 70 


7,900 56 


Concord 




23,152 24 


615 42 


23,767 66 


116,590 83 


1,863 21 


118,454 04 


Conway 




1,664 18 


594 33 


2,258 51 


4,350 72 


4,231 93 


8,582 65 


Cummington 




- 


407 23 


407 23 


466 23 


1,290 48 


1,756 71 


Dalton . 




12,726 13 


1,088 85 


13,814 98 


11,942 58 


2,920 15 


14,862 73 


Dan vers 




399 91 


49 60 


449 51 


323 06 


284 34 


607 40 


Dartmouth 




19,333 29 


1,718 02 


21,051 31 


95,580 09 


2,049 50 


97,629 59 


Dedham 




3,961 42 


233 45 


4,194 87 


6,992 19 


1,845 70 


8,837 89 


Deerfield 




34,532 05 


1,962 17 


36,494 22 


74,626 08 


6,190 15 


80,816 23 


Dennis . 




27,626 23 


1,168 39 


28,794 62 


40,441 83 


2,340 56 


42,782 39 


Dighton 




8,449 39 


1,671 49 


10,120 88 


49,335 17 


2,509 25 


51,844 42 


Douglas 




6,824 35 


520 77 


7,345 12 


12,847 52 


1,409 60 


14,257 12 


Dover . 




8,470 43 


468 95 


8,939 38 


6,952 87 


1,469 68 


8,422 55 


Dracut . 




7,803 37 


1,244 58 


9,047 95 


10,847 70 


3,385 75 


14,233 46 


Dudley . 




11,865 43 


1,437 61 


13,303 04 


16,962 21 


3,290 02 


20,252 23 


Duxbury 




13,954 96 


782 60 


14,737 56 


51,862 55 


4,105 44 


55,967 99 


East Bridgewater . 


780 17 


574 57 


1,354 74 


27,274 81 


2,476 18 


29,750 99 


East Brookfield . 


— 


374 31 


374 31 




98,383 67 


98,383 67 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



45 





Expended per Mile 


in 1921. 




Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 












Total 


Amount 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


to be assessed 

on Cities 
and Towns. 




priation. 












848,931 38 


$107 36 


$688 37 


$795 73 


$614 75 


5.940 


$1,188 00 


246,467 86 


250 46 


1,438 73 


1,689 19 


1,967 17 


7.866 


1,573 20 


56,740 65 


233 33 


291 65 


524 98 


774 31 


4.603 


460 30 


17,606 19 


327 80 


494 74 


822 54 


536 26 


2.028 


834 05 


42,743 98 


454 29 


517 94 


972 23 


762 78 


3.993 


798 60 


27,013 84 


611 61 


513 54 


1,125 15 


483 95 


3.295 


1,853 68 


26,090 49 


188 02 


611 02 


799 04 


605 56 


7.056 


2,819 03 


142,888 01 


806 95 


4,561 03 


5,367 98 


1,556 61 


4.353 


5,723 09 


1,572 18 


111 57 


216 50 


328 07 


606 08 


1.297 


212 76 


71,468 03 


530 07 


1,145 31 


1,675 38 


2,322 58 


6.147 


614 70 


71,602 71 


163 84 


305 63 


469 47 


672 43 


8.173 


408 65 


15,237 65 


123 10 


783 44 


906 54 


409 93 


1.608 


160 80 


17,671 31 


421 30 


617 19 


1,038 49 


394 11 


3.198 


319 80 


66,201 25 


149 23 


437 69 


586 92 


950 78 


5.582 


1,638 10 


106,841 10 


254 05 


1,213 19 


1,467 24 


1,729 66 


3.389 


2,486 24 


127,165 36 


778 69 


796 85 


1,575 54 


1,132 93 


5.299 


1,059 80 


4,464 05 


186 08 


679 78 


865 86 


504 92 


1.637 


163 70 


10,845 61 


154 90 


586 62 


741 52 


558 70 


3.478 


695 60 


83,543 70 


160 18 


321 22 


481 40 


415 82 


19.837 


4,774 83 


53,225 97 


303 18 


685 25 


988 43 


773 39 


6.062 


1,212 40 


321,275 18 


145 87 


1,924 31 


2,070 18 


2,269 75 


17.718 


885 90 


15,858 12 


291 27 


807 16 


1,098 43 


505 03 


1.648 


329 eo 


14,868 68 


101 97 


612 32 


714 29 


315 81 


3.228 


322 80 


18,213 64 


613 85 


395 76 


1,009 61 


358 56 


3.180 


318 00 


7,005 98 


874 51 


422 35 


1,296 86 


454 31 


1.258 


62 90 


151,335 19 


94 83 


10,304 55 


10,399 38 


2,730 10 


8.777 


438 85 


230,743 08 


343 05 


1,481 90 


1,824 95 


2,126 80 


5.681 


3,491 83 


17,054 26 


363 86 


804 89 


1,168 75 


717 48 


5.952 


3,147 44 


31,903 94 


768 68 


1,084 77 


1,853 45 


1,053 10 


2.072 


414 40 


16,723 80 


259 88 


897 04 


1,156 92 


1,103 59 


4.133 


206 65 


89,986 57 


638 19 


671 70 


1,309 89 


5,181 17 


1.396 


914 31 


80,565 18 


103 33 


8,945 42 


9,048 75 


534 35 


12.864 


4,840 80 


24,891 03 


329 95 


565 30 


895 25 


414 09 


3.311 


165 55 


25,243 78 


171 67 


824 68 


996 35 


714 47 


5.968 


2,973 10 


67,439 29 


108 33 


431 16 


539 49 


397 65 


7.821 


391 05 


48,186 18 


278 17 


1,220 89 


1,499 06 


802 97 


4.541 


3,403 62 


29,443 67 


266 18 


815 48 


1,081 66 


349 24 


3.967 


198 35 


50,979 22 


122 14 


587 11 


709 25 


710 31 


3.790 


1,344 03 


100,537 78 


814 70 


18,580 76 


19,395 46 


1,342 36 


1.775 


88 75 


70,348 66 


235 91 


748 94 


984 85 


752 55 


4.305 


861 00 


32,811 19 


405 23 


796 61 


1,201 84 


520 11 


3.799 


379 90 


77,442 52 


335 93 


849 58 


1,185 51 


1,647 82 


4.350 


2,578 49 


77,770 90 


333 34 


1,174 57 


1,507 91 


1,057 17 


11.919 


596 10 


66,667 01 


345 47 


877 36 


1,222 83 


567 82 


10.376 


1,003 00 


55,976 26 


78 73 


592 14 


670 87 


486 04 


7.166 


1,433 20 


71,550 29 


628 79 


875 44 


1,504 23 


725 30 


7.188 


5,406 20 


33,944 77 


2,207 69 


1,844 08 


4,051 77 


1,304 71 


.959 


1,918 00 


48,784 79 


314 62 


1,106 80 


1,421 42 


553 26 


6.670 


333 50 


66,057 78 


383 44 


1,435 14 


1,818 58 


682 66 


6.616 


661 60 


90,724 69 


414 52 


1,158 79 


1,573 31 


1,356 77 


3.954 


3,110 43 


47,526 95 


85 38 


2,107 44 


2,192 82 


517 46 


7.789 


389 45 


22,027 51 


376 91 


1,542 09 


1,919 00 


982 75 


2.876 


143 80 


55,749 40 


81 32 


137 47 


218 79 


1,157 80 


2.280 


249 42 


13,023 43 


56 94 


651 52 


708 46 


299 43 


2.133 


213 30 


142,221 70 


146 88 


444 68 


591 56 


1,916 71 


4.190 


1,239 33 


10,841 16 


193 34 


1,376 69 


1,570 03 


1,113 74 


3.074 


153 70 


2,163 94 


66 58 


211 00 


277 58 


1,135 33 


6.116 


305 80 


28,677 71 


379 26 


1,017 12 


1,396 38 


502 73 


2.871 


531 40 


1,056 91 


16 87 


96 71 


113 58 


205 50 


2.940 


166 97 


118,580 90 


370 10 


441 51 


811 61 


1,348 23 


4.642 


1,883 76 


13,032 76 


99 17 


784 07 


883 24 


433 61 


2.354 


1,039 58 


117,310 45 


161 26 


508 78 


669 98 


818 51 


12.168 


2,433 60 


71,577 01 


155 83 


312 16 


467 89 


439 18 


7.498 


749 80 


61,965 30 


274 06 


411 42 


685 48 


817 76 


6.099 


1,219 40 


21,602 24 


245 07 


663 34 


908 41 


590 01 


2.125 


425 00 


17,361 93 


215 01 


673 86 


888 87 


556 49 


2.181 


436 20 


23,281 41 


218 23 


593 68 


811 91 


428 27 


5.703 


1,140 60 


33,555 27 


316 59 


724 51 


1,041 10 


817 11 


4.541 


908 20 


70,705 55 


87 76 


460 41 


548 17 


590 69 


8.917 


1,783 40 


31,105 73 


152 57 


657 50 


810 07 


2,880 69 


3.766 


753 20 


98,757 98 


104 24 


27,397 29 


27,501 53 


15,606 50 


3.591 


179 55 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 









Amounts 


EXPENDED. 






Town or Citt. 


REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 
















Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


East Longmeadow 


$7,279 70 


$1,366 76 


$8,646 46 


$9,206 38 


$953 40 


$10,159 78 


Eastham 


11,873 32 


24 87 


11,898 19 


131,154 84 


40,349 21 


171,504 05 


Easthampton 


8,476 88 


187 56 


8,664 44 


27,383 32 


1,045 37 


28,428 69 


Easton . 


5,156 01 


166 00 


5,322 01 


22,332 03 


59 16 


22,391 19 


Edgartown . 


7,420 86 


276 06 


7,696 92 


3,459 45 


345 71 


3,805 16 


Egremont 


2,605 23 


641 37 


3,246 60 


11,228 93 


4,103 25 


15,332 18 


Erving . 


18,670 68 


1,216 19 


19,886 87 


56,640 70 


5,749 56 


62,390 26 


Essex 


6,806 38 


456 90 


7,263 28 


5,847 84 


1,985 20 


7,833 04 


Fairhaven 


3,358 05 


757 46 


4,115 51 


22,182 66 


1,483 93 


23,666 59 


Fall River . 


66 30 


23 10 


89 40 


179 58 


44 47 


224 05 


Falmouth 


41,637 69 


1,962 78 


43,600 47 


88,584 02 


9,058 90 


97,642 92 


Fitchburg 


16,286 75 


605 61 


16,892 36 


86,503 67 


1,595 51 


88,099 18 


Florida . 


24,586 10 


4,220 20 


28.806 30 


49,569 29 


8,770 78 


58,340 07 


Foxborough . 


8,195 04 


974 23 


9,169 27 


26,221 13 


795 78 


27,016 91 


Framingham 


16,146 46 


3,038 56 


19,185 02 


13,796 27 


2,044 78 


15,841 05 


Franklin 


10,261 35 


3,349 20 


13,610 55 


10,588 14 


1,208 89 


11,797 03 


Freetown 


8,499 79 


260 70 


8,760 49 


50,164 83 


1,401 44 


51,566 27 


Gardner 


10,858 78 


673 44 


11,532 22 


45,633 68 


1,924 83 


47,558 51 


Gay Head 


4,143 79 


443 60 


4,587 39 


6,912 41 


1,435 18 


8,347 59 


Gill 


71 50 


- 


71 50 


109 41 


10 83 


120 24 


Gloucester 


56,117 04 


579 97 


56,697 01 


43,162 38 


3,477 19 


46,639 57 


Goshen . 


9,430 61 


328 80 


9,759 41 


19,783 72 


1,773 79 


21,557 51 


Grafton 


21,234 16 


3,916 95 


25,151 11 


24,056 36 


6,621 76 


30,678 12 


Granby 


15,390 23 


1,612 40 


17,002 63 


15,447 95 


4,871 83 


20,319 78 


Great Barrington . 


20,990 61 


1,091 22 


22,081 83 


43,074 38 


5,090 88 


48,165 26 


Greenfield 


9,184 93 


698 16 


9,883 09 


71,939 69 


50,504 25 


122,443 94 


Groton . 


3,867 52 


516 66 


4,384 18 


5,784 04 


1,557 75 


7,341 79 


Groveland 


8,187 04 


1,370 04 


9,557 08 


9,318 48 


297 30 


9,615 78 


Hadley . 


21,838 58 


1,276 72 


23,115 30 


50,027 31 


2,393 67 


52,420 98 


Hamilton 


14,281 69 


353 65 


14,635 34 


58,162 04 


1,062 58 


59,224 62 


Hancock 


49,045 90 


148 94 


49,194 84 


173,324 34 


24,158 55 


197,482 89 


Hanover 


4,966 47 


1,019 52 


5,985 99 


14,058 93 


4,472 32 


18,531 25 


Hardwick 


3,446 47 


1,299 62 


4,746 09 


3,621 86 


1,098 64 


4,720 50 


Harvard 


6,071 85 


829 80 


6,901 65 


8,304 41 


1,512 19 


9,816 60 


Harwich 


14,792 34 


1,664 74 


16,457 08 


39,801 64 


2,101 27 


41,902 91 


Hatfield 


8,183 86 


255 27 


8,439 13 


70,345 76 


1,500 15 


71,845 91 


Haverhill 


33,974 28 


5,143 69 


39,117 97 


22,080 13 


3,927 22 


26,007 35 


Hingham 


10,624 87 


339 99 


10,964 86 


50,494 44 


2,910 95 


53,405 39 


Hinsdale 


2,724 98 


316 55 


3,041 53 


3,643 69 


2,286 59 


5,930 28 


Holbrook 


4,786 48 


684 30 


5,470 78 


7,670 74 


696 62 


8,367 36 


Holden . 


25,405 63 


2,161 69 


27,567 32 


27,716 90 


3,779 75 


31,496 65 


Holliston 


8,485 58 


1,464 28 


9,949 86 


9,876 74 


1,922 11 


11,798 85 


Holyoke 


9,700 25 


926 85 


10,627 10 


45,946 42 


2,608 99 


48,555 41 


Hopedale 


291 90 


426 83 


718 73 


582 22 


279 68 


861 90 


Hudson 


4,103 72 


431 82 


4,535 54 


3,237 61 


1,144 79 


4,382 40 


Huntington . 


16,983 40 


2,773 99 


19,757 39 


17,306 46 


8,280 09 


25,586 55 


Ipswich 


22,331 97 


4,679 52 


27,011 49 


75,951 16 


3,701 02 


79,652 18 


Kingston 


2,909 35 


722 96 


3,632 31 


6,269 80 


2,575 83 


8,845 63 


Lakeville 


11,407 11 


1,289 00 


12,696 11 


54,002 89 


3,645 08 


57,647 97 


Lancaster 


5,851 25 


651 42 


6,502 67 


5,496 11 


2,540 48 


8,036 59 


Lanesborough 


5,766 01 


736 50 


6,502 51 


5,958 58 


1,210 15 


7,168 73 


Lawrence 


7,075 29 


542 68 


7,617 97 


22,192 95 


268 14 


22,461 09 


Lee 


39,228 28 


3,925 78 


43,154 06 


33,126 82 


8,565 23 


41,692 05 


Leicester 


48,214 90 


3,804 14 


52,019 04 


107,456 89 


95,591 64 


203,048 53 


Lenox . 


57,105 66 


3,593 20 


60,698 86 


57,534 44 


9,956 43 


67,490 87 


Leominster . 


10,270 01 


2,120 43 


12,390 44 


8,790 98 


4,076 67 


12,867 65 


Lexington 


25,933 15 


571 84 


26,504 99 


114,402 07 


2,832 08 


117,234 15 


Lincoln . 


11,988 41 


237 38 


12,225 79 


69,183 18 


1,421 30 


70,604 48 


Littleton 


16,641 88 


2,236 97 


18,878 85 


84,204 65 


143,459 06 


227,663 71 


Lowell . 


28,895 39 


2,407 88 


31,303 27 


25,163 71 


4,797 67 


29,961 38 


Lunenburg . 


22,691 88 


2,433 67 


25,125 55 


140,744 66 


62,420 34 


203,165 00 


Lynn 


15,716 71 


3,943 16 


19,659 87 


15,064 53 


3,418 62 


18,483 15 


Lynnfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


98 51 


98 51 


Maiden . 


239 12 


18 50 


257 62 


487 66 


26 65 


514 31 


Mansfield 


2,763 78 


489 49 


3,253 27 


11,567 69 


188 58 


11,756 27 


Marion . 


19,112 25 


712 91 


19,825 16 


64,339 69 


1,070 79 


65,410 48 


Marlborough 


42,306 59 


1,982 73 


44,289 32 


168,512 34 


4,450 90 


172,963 24 


Marshfield . 


16,838 73 


1,207 24 


18,045 97 


96,276 32 


6,616 27 


102,892 59 


Mashpee 


3,008 52 


787 37 


3,795 89 


4,926 35 


2,378 85 


7,305 20 


Mattapoisett 


10,146 70 


419 82 


10,566 52 


68,911 69 


1,250 14 


70,161 83 


Medford 


3,429 52 


166 83 


3,596 35 


20,053 24 


603 26 


20,656 50 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



47 





Expended per Mile 


in 1921. 
















Total 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 












Amount 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


to be assessed 

on Cities 
and Towns. 


$18,806 24 


$759 73 


$529 96 


$1,289 69 


$729 23 


1.799 


$179 90 


183,402 24 


3 85 


6,246 00 


6,249 85 


2,172 06 


6.460 


323 00 


37,093 13 


68 50 


381 80 


450 30 


630 59 


2.738 


616 47 


27,713 20 


207 24 


73 85 


281 09 


1,652 54 


.801 


112 58 


11,502 08 


113 75 


142 44 


256 19 


197 52 


2.427 


242 70 


18,578 78 


117 42 


751 24 


868 66 


588 44 


5.462 


273 10 


82,277 13 


149 72 


707 81 


857 53 


797 38 


8.123 


812 30 


15<,096 32 


313 59 


1,362 52 


1,676 11 


974 96 


1.457 


145 70 


27,782 10 


203 24 


398 16 


601 40 


589 21 


3.727 


1,120 69 


313 45 


721 87 


1,389 68 


2,111 55 


1,411 93 


.032 


33 79 


141,243 39 


126 41 


583 43 


709 84 


573 61 


15.527 


5,510 84 


104,991 54 


147 06 


387 44 


534 50 


1,208 64 


4.118 


1,100 56 


87,146 37 


586 79 


1,219 52 


1,806 31 


1,704 57 


7.192 


719 20 


36,186 18 


277 24 


226 46 


503 70 


608 86 


3.514 


702 80 


35,026 07 


948 07 


638 00 


1,586 07 


744 09 


3.205 


2,541 67 


25,407 58 


890 03 


321 26 


1,211 29 


580 48 


3.763 


2,279 05 


60,326 76 


67 38 


362 22 


429 60 


898 43 


3.869 


386 90 


59,090 73 


200 67 


573 55 


774 22 


784 55 


3.356 


1,299 13 


12,934 98 


141 54 


457 95 


599 49 


600 68 


3.134 


156 70 


191 74 


- 


38 13 


38 13 


80 80 


.284 


5 42 


103,336 58 


85 92 


515 14 


601 06 


1,069 39 


6.750 


2,028 58 


31,316 92 


133 66 


721 05 


854 71 


554 24 


2.460 


123 00 


55,829 23 


408 95 


691 35 


1,100 30 


643 06 


9.578 


1,915 60 


37,322 41 


209 78 


633 86 


843 64 


426 92 


7.686 


384 30 


70,247 09 


125 38 


584 96 


710 34 


744 35 


8.703 


3,091 05 


132,327 03 


89 65 


6,484 88 


6,574 53 


1,583 81 


7.788 


11,402 00 


11,725 97 


96 55 


291 11 


387 66 


377 49 


5.351 


1,037 20 


19,172 86 


795 14 


172 55 


967 69 


599 45 


1.723 


172 30 


75,536 28 


272 22 


510 38 


782 60 


783 22 


4.690 


938 00 


73,859 96 


114 04 


342 66 


456 70 


1,561 29 


3.101 


620 40 


246,677 73 


46 08 


7,474 80 


7,520 88 


3,257 33 


3.232 


161 60 


24,517 24 


178 96 


785 03 


963 99 


636 20 


5.697 


1,139 20 


9,466 59 


1,586 84 


1,341 44 


2,928 28 


529 45 


.819 


163 80 


16,718 25 


358 29 


652 93 


1,011 22 


461 25 


2.316 


463 20 


58,359 99 


257 02 


324 42 


581 44 


485 61 


6.477 


647 70 


80,285 04 


72 11 


423 77 


495 88 


1,865 48 


3.540 


708 00 


65,125 32 


899 88 


687 06 


1,586 94 


687 55 


5.716 


4,535 46 


64,370 25 


55 22 


472 79 


528 01 


906 32 


6.157 


1,625 47 


8,971 81 


89 80 


648 68 


738 48 


375 31 


3.525 


176 25 


13,838 14 


174 79 


177 94 


352 73 


317 91 


3.915 


690 46 


59,063 97 


311 08 


543 93 


855 01 


492 13 


6.949 


1,389 80 


21,748 71 


297 38 


390 36 


687 74 


219 20 


4.924 


984 80 


59,182 51 


222 43 


626 11 


848 54 


1,247 78 


4.167 


1,767 92 


1,580 63 


1,350 73 


88 50 


1,439 23 


1,429 15 


.316 


353 26 


8,917 94 


378 12 


1,002 44 


1,380 56 


530 90 


1.142 


788 30 


45,343 94 


346 10 


1,033 07 


1,379 17 


712 80 


8.015 


400 75 


106,663 67 


1,058 47 


837 15 


1,895 62 


1,989 51 


4.421 


4,190 27 


12,477 94 


284 74 


1,014 51 


1,299 25 


437 50 


2.539 


253 90 


70,344 08 


154 19 


436 01 


590 20 


611 71 


8.360 


836 00 


14,539 26 


521 55 


2,034 01 


2,555 56 


606 96 


1.249 


249 80 


13,671 24 


212 98 


349 96 


562 94 


563 43 


3.458 


117 00 


30,079 06 


669 98 


331 04 


1,001 02 


3,038 59 


.810 


405 41 


84,846 11 


366 69 


800 04 


1,166 73 


602 00 


10.706 


2,141 20 


255,067 57 


789 40 


17,581 69 


18,371 09 


2,204 41 


5.437 


1,087 40 


128,189 73 


468 90 


1,299 29 


1,768 19 


1,002 91 


7.663 


6,774 81 


25,258 09 


831 86 


1,599 32 


2,431 18 


571 28 


2.549 


3,098 55 


143,739 14 


114 21 


565 62 


679 83 


1,401 09 


* 5.007 


1,701 96 


82,830 27 


115 23 


689 95 


805 18 


1,615 82 


2.060 


206 00 


246,542 56 


253 39 


16,250 46 


16,503 85 


3,435 17 


8.828 


882 80 


61,264 65 


907 26 


1,807 71 


2,714 97 


1,052 55 


2.654 


3,602 77 


228,290 55 


413 47 


10,604 88 


11,018 35 


2,706 59 


5.886 


588 60 


38,143 02 


1,076 78 


933 54 


2,010 32 


1,192 90 


3.662 


3,680 89 


98 51 


- 


64 72 


64 72 


648 09 


1.522 


49 25 


771 93 


122 52 


176 49 


299 01 


1,495 99 


.151 


22 58 


15,009 54 


403 54 


155 47 


559 01 


710 21 


1.213 


339 03 


85,235 64 


107 85 


162 00 


269 85 


671 27 


6.610 


891 85 


217,252 56 


283 98 


637 48 


921 46 


1,772 68 


6.982 


3,216 83 


120,938 56 


145 85 


799 36 


945 21 


869 94 


8.277 


1,655 40 


11,101 09 


100 79 


304 51 


405 30 


199 92 


7.812 


390 60 


80,728 35 


130 95 


389 94 


520 89 


1,139 55 


3.206 


320 60 


24,252 85 


193 54 


699 83 


893 37 


2,100 54 


.862 


385 05 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 









Amounts 


EXPENDED. 








REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 


Town or Citt. 




























Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


Melrose . 


$3,013 00 


$103 15 


$3,116 15 


$2,419 59 


$443 98 


$2,863 57 


Mendon 


519 01 


444 84 


963 85 


3,078 86 


722 00 


3,800 86 


Merrimac 


10,198 73 


2,196 43 


12,395 16 


8,413 38 


2,449 32 


10,862 70 


Methuen 


15,168 04 


2,731 15 


17,899 19 


83,646 68 


2,277 54 


85,924 22 


Middleborough 


28,645 28 


1,999 75 


30,645 03 


119,726 80 


6,629 62 


126,356 42 


Middleton 


15,946 17 


46 39 


15,992 56 


3,299 70 


1,437 78 


4,737 48 


Milford . 


7,246 92 


1,680 90 


8,927 82 


11,375 75 


3,924 02 


15,299 77 


Millbury 


20,382 30 


867 64 


21,249 94 


54,457 45 


3,184 54 


57,641 99 


Millville 


3,981 90 


1,128 11 


5,110 01 


4,949 34 


2,698 60 


7,647 94 


Milton . 


8,317 25 


369 08 


3,686 33 


14,847 51 


641 59 


15,489 10 


Monson 


5,177 77 


299 98 


5,477 75 


2,576 30 


961 54 


3,537 84 


Montague 


13,756 04 


1,599 36 


15,355 40 


47,364 32 


12,136 35 


59,500 67 


Nantucket . 


24,886 21 


1,802 23 


26,688 44 


14,030 11 


3,326 44 


17,356 55 


Natick . 


15,989 49 


617 06 


16,606 55 


81,743 46 


1,556 03 


83,299 49 


Needham 


7,092 42 


604 15 


7,696 57 


6,792 73 


970 09 


7,762 82 


New Ashford 


- 


- 


- 


— 


66 27 


66 27 


New Braintree 


546 86 


123 40 


670 26 


445 42 


85 55 


530 97 


Newbury 


22,251 28 


3,436 01 


25,687 29 


18,976 37 


4,539 30 


23>515 67 


Newburyport 


14,257 10 


754 90 


15,012 00 


10,219 37 


1,170 05 


11,389 42 


New Marlborough 


269 06 


- 


269 06 


192 06 


100 66 


292 72 


Newton 


4,274 57 


71 56 


4,346 13 


18,432 07 


158 35 


18,590 42 


Norfolk 


6,649 64 


355 52 


7,005 16 


16,084 60 


1,332 97 


17,417 57 


North Adams 


64,529 75 


5,160 43 


69,690 18 


116,591 81 


85,197 75 


201,789 56 


Northampton 


12,288 24 


743 95 


13,032 19 


47,212 43 


1,945 92 


49,158 35 


North Andover 


22,764 29 


7,666 60 


30,430 89 


19,097 21 


4,378 22 


23,475 43 


North Attleborough 


14,162 74 


1,016 05 


15,178 79 


55,599 94 


1,766 36 


57,366 30 


Northborough 


20,383 95 


1,047 67 


21,431 62 


76,761 30 


3,115 13 


79,876 43 


Northbridge . 


1,242 09 


240 74 


1,482 83 


3,006 95 


1,125 01 


4,131 96 


North Brookfield . 


4,332 42 


786 51 


5,118 93 


5,101 14 


2,212 25 


7,313 39 


Northfield . 


8,390 46 


792 61 


9,183 07 


25,858 45 


3,472 09 


29,330 54 


North Reading 


21,742 95 


377 31 


22,120 26 


67,768 29 


2,149 03 


69,917 32 


Norton . 


12,994 13 


2,888 34 


15,882 47 


17,589 49 


1,258 51 


18,848 00 


Norwell 


- 


- 


— 


— 


141 80 


141 80 


Norwood 


14,659 31 


1,604 61 


16,263 92 


28,840 91 


2,330 58 


31,171 49 


Oak Bluffs . 


11,361 56 


1,093 91 


12,455 47 


7,105 67 


279 88 


7,385 55 


Oakham 


1,463 47 


559 57 


2,023 04 


6,168 94 


1,146 47 


7,315 41 


Orange . 


21,538 55 


1,558 19 


23,096 74 


64,479 27 


7,070 36 


71,549 63 


Orleans . 


10,745 79 


472 97 


11,218 76 


17,966 36 


1,638 90 


19,605 26 


Oxford . 


8,700 34 


1,440 58 


10,140 92 


10,238 34 


4,429 79 


14,668 13 


Palmer . 


49,397 91 


4,421 81 


53,819 72 


146,656 01 


118,735 47 


265,391 48 


Paxton . 


26,846 75 


1,003 50 


27,850 25 


25,960 59 


3,584 95 


29,545 54 


Peabody 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Pembroke 


4,255 85 


564 74 


4,820 59 


5,388 38 


3,114 07 


8,502 45 


Pepperell 


4,643 86 


753 72 


5,397 58 


10,049 12 


2,576 99 


12,626 11 


Petersham 


1,651 04 


1,692 15 


3,343 19 


6,749 46 


4,860 79 


11,610 25 


Phillipston . 


25,552 50 


139 66 


25,692 16 


30,240 81 


1,550 10 


31,790 91 


Pittsfield 


61,981 66 


2,449 07 


64,430 73 


150,293 41 


35,059 62 


185,353 03 


Plainville 


7,054 41 


2,397 10 


9,451 51 


28,644 76 


3,230 25 


31,875 01 


Plymouth 


20,900 30 


1,310 77 


22,211 07 


80,874 19 


8,647 43 


89,521 62 


Princeton 


4,602 30 


312 83 


4,915 13 


7,864 18 


1,439 27 


9,303 45 


Provincetown 


5,734 39 


1,693 23 


7,427 62 


16,051 97 


5,490 37 


21,542 34 


Quincy . 


10,637 55 


1,188 54 


11,826 09 


62,475 55 


1,796 39 


64,271 94 


Randolph 


4,270 57 


607 14 


4,877 71 


52,211 22 


2,718 75 


54,929 97 


Raynham 


6,189 58 


1,016 56 


7,206 14 


15,135 51 


2,495 20 


17,630 71 


Reading 


41,354 87 


446 83 


41,801 70 


56,731 78 


5,535 64 


62,267 42 


Rehoboth 


17,223 84 


4,067 48 


21,291 32 


63,467 62 


5,000 84 


68,468 46 


Revere . 


19,186 76 


2,777 19 


21,963 95 


42,960 61 


4,894 95 


47,855 56 


Richmond 


9,573 87 


593 25 


10,167 12 


31,914 45 


4,905 06 


36,819 51 


Rochester 


11,694 81 


855 59 


12,550 40 


32,485 79 


1,878 33 


34,364 12 


Rockland 


8,461 90 


448 20 


8,910 10 


14,879 56 


4,977 86 


19,857 42 


Rockport 


10,736 31 


1,004 23 


11,740 54 


4,659 98 


1,147 68 


5,807 66 


Rowley . 


14,204 77 


2,311 06 


16,515 83 


100,421 24 


2,512 79 


102,934 03 


Royalston 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 79 


20 79 


Russell . 


41,218 01 


3,232 24 


44,450 25 


52,647 65 


8,873 36 


61,521 01 


Rutland 


5,973 42 


899 90 


6,873 32 


13,077 23 


2,164 48 


15,241 71 


Salem . 


20,515 15 


649 92 


21,165 07 


12,999 84 


2,702 63 


15,702 47 


Salisbury 


12,895 01 


3,416 89 


16,311 90 


57,164 47 


4,294 16 


61,458 63 


Sandwich 


14,288 87 


889 88 


15,178 75 


31,937 28 


3,217 85 


35,155 13 


Saugus . 


19,457 27 


1,953 68 


21,410 95 


71,264 00 


3,034 05 


74 298 05 


Savoy . 


4,635 26 


671 12 


5,306 38 


9,847 28 


3,755 10 


13,602 38 


Scituate 


14,229 36 


677 88 


14,907 24 


48,945 32 


6,487 20 


55,432 52 


Seekonk 


13,503 05 


2,161 88 


15,664 93 


90,877 17 


3,755 51 


94,632 68 


Sharon . 


1,051 56 


222 32 


1,273 88 


1,750 49 


338 69 


2,089 18 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



49 





Expended per Mile 


in 1921. 
















Total 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 












Amount 


Total 
expended. 


From 

Revenue 

Appro- 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


to be assessed 

on Cities 
and Towns. 




priation. 












$5,979 72 


$181 60 


$781 65 


$963 25 


$905 60 


.568 


$273 56 


4,764 71 


240 97 


391 12 


632 09 


640 16 


1.846 


92 30 


23,257 86 


984 50 


1,097 86 


2,082 36 


502 99 


2.231 


223 10 


103,823 41 


350 28 


292 10 


642 38 


1,079 85 


7.797 


2,504 35 


157,001 45 


160 71 


532 80 


693 51 


683 09 


12.443 


3,504 58 


30,730 04 


17 47 


541 54 


559 01 


1,078 28 


2.655 


265 50 


24,227 59 


474 02 


1,106 60 


1,580 62 


505 28 


3.546 


2,802 46 


78,891 93 


291 05 


1,068 28 


1,359 33 


1,489 06 


2.981 


596 20 


12,757 95 


680 81 


1,628 61 


2,309 42 


541 19 


1.657 


165 70 


24,175 43 


349 17 


606 99 


956 16 


1,284 22 


1.057 


505 34 


9,015 59 


185 75 


595 38 


781 13 


260 27 


1.615 


323 00 


74,856 07 


279 12 


2,118 04 


2,397 16 


811 44 


5.730 


6,867 85 


44,044 99 


278 16 


513 42 


791 58 


291 91 


6.479 


2,564 34 


99,906 04 


192 59 


485 65 


678 24 


1,711 57 


3.204 


1,086 54 


15,459 39 


296 88 


476 70 


773 58 


442 52 


2.035 


787 12 


66 27 


- 


66 27 


66 27 


- 


1.000 


33 13 


1,201 23 


310 83 


215 49 


526 32 


150 68 


.397 


19 85 


49,202 96 


812 10 


1,072 87 


1,884 97 


622 19 


4.231 


846 20 


26,401 42 


340 04 


527 05 


867 09 


623 24 


2.220 


962 46 


561 78 


- 


437 65 


437 65 


814 18 


.230 


23 00 


22,936 55 


69 34 


153 44 


222 78 


1,067 11 


1.032 


114 96 


24,422 73 


245 86 


921 83 


1,167 69 


548 01 


1.446 


144 60 


271,479 74 


634 27 


10,471 70 


11,105 97 


2,305 54 


8.136 


7,254 67 


62,190 54 


106 23 


277 87 


384 10 


843 01 


7.003 


1,344 94 


53,906 32 


722 99 


412 88 


1,135 87 


492 76 


10.604 


6,022 41 


72,545 09 


282 39 


490 93 


773 32 


812 90 


3.598 


1,391 20 


101,308 05 


195 46 


581 18 


776 64 


1,138 83 


5.360 


1,072 00 


5,614 79 


53 51 


250 06 


303 57 


285 23 


4.499 


682 87 


12,432 32 


349 25 


982 35 


1,331 60 


385 52 


2.252 


450 40 


38,513 61 


164 17 


719 16 


883 33 


956 31 


4.828 


427 80 


92,037 58 


148 66 


846 74 


995 40 


1,825 45 


2.538 


253 80 


34,730 47 


379 00 


165 14 


544 14 


569 85 


7.621 


762 10 


141 80 


- 


66 32 


66 32 


33 16 


2.138 


70 90 


47,435 41 


755 82 


1,097 78 


1,853 60 


953 36 


2.123 


1,967 59 


19,841 02 


458 28 


117 25 


575 53 


326 52 


2.387 


477 40 


9,338 45 


200 42 


410 63 


611 05 


645 90 


2.792 


139 60 


94,646 37 


324 96 


1,474 53 


1,799 49 


925 68 


4.795 


959 00 


30,824 02 


100 67 


348 85 


449 52 


376 50 


4.698 


939 60 


24,809 05 


167 82 


516 05 


683 87 


550 37 


8.584 


1,716 80 


319,211 20 


307 82 


8,265 61 


8,573 43 


1,870 81 


14.365 


12,332 14 


57,395 79 


278 98 


996 65 


1,275 63 


647 44 


3.597 


179 85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.238 


_ 


13,323 04 


129 97 


716 70 


846 67 


452 07 


4.345 


434 00 


18,023 69 


210 71 


720 43 


931 14 


582 61 


3.577 


715 60 


14,953 44 


206 77 


593 79 


800 50 


738 40 


8.186 


766 40 


57,483 07 


50 15 


556 59 


606 74 


1,191 31 


2.785 


139 25 


249,783 76 


270 53 


3,872 71 


4,143 24 


1,839 94 


9.053 


6,348 70 


41,326 52 


1,045 40 


1,408 74 


2,454 14 


1,158 19 


2.293 


229 30 


111,732 69 


91 03 


604 72 


695 75 


555 18 


14.300 


5,089 87 


14,218 58 


140 28 


645 41 


785 69 


322 79 


2.230 


223 00 


28,969 96 


437 75 


1,419 43 


1,857 18 


940 46 


3.868 


773 60 


76,098 03 


368 31 


556 67 


924 98 


1,656 32 


3.227 


1,492 47 


59,807 68 


163 65 


732 82 


896 47 


1,417 51 


3.710 


742 00 


24,836 85 


179 83 


441 39 


621 22 


441 85 


5.653 


565 30 


104,069 12 


113 90 


1,411 07 


1,524 97 


1,461 50 


3.923 


2,991 24 


89,759 78 


621 37 


763 95 


1,385 32 


800 41 


6.546 


654 60 


69,819 51 


553 12 


974 90 


1,528 02 


2,307 47 


5.021 


3,836 07 


46,986 63 


147 68 


1,221 08 


1,368 78 


623 18 


4.017 


200 85 


46,914 52 


138 67 


304 43 


443 10 


448 42 


6.170 


617 00 


28,767 52 


190 40 


2,114 63 


2,305 03 


730 38 


2.354 


2,713 03 


17,548 20 


627 64 


717 28 


1,344 92 


790 47 


1.600 


320 00 


119,449 86 


636 13 


691 66 


1,327 79 


2,632 79 


3.633 


363 30 


20 79 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 




105,971 26 


332 53 


912 90 


1,245 43 


611 50 


9.720 


1,944 00 


22,115 03 


162 17 


390 07 


552 24 


657 48 


5.549 


554 90 


36,867 54 


196 35 


816 50 


1,012 85 


1,222 68 


3.310 


1,120 96 


77,770 53 


345 04 


433 62 


778 66 


838 33 


9.903 


990 30 


50,333 88 


93 46 


337 97 


431 42 


464 05 


9.521 


952 10 


95,709 00 


301 65 


468 43 


770 08 


1,992 61 


6.477 


2,493 86 


18,908 76 


372 22 


2,082 70 


2,454 92 


1,480 02 


1.803 


90 20 


70,339 76 


126 14 


1,207 15 


1,333 29 


766 70 


5.374 


3,582 54 


110,297 61 


358 58 


622 91 


981 49 


1,344 58 


6.029 


1,205 80 


3,363 06 


348 46 


530 86 


879 32 


402 04 


.638 


127 6a 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 











Amounts 


EXPENDED. 






Town or City. 


REVENUE APPROPRIATIONS. 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE FEES FUND. 


Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


Total 
to 1921. 


During 
1921. 


Total. 


Sheffield 


$8,962 98 


$1,738 35 


$10,701 33 


$15,442 05 


$5,943 85 


$21,385 90 


Shelburne 




15,080 65 


1,425 15 


16,505 80 


30,270 76 


5,720 06 


35,990 82 


Shirley . 




2,503 44 


340 13 


2,843 57 


2,940 95 


1,450 88 


4,391 83 


Shrewsbury 




51,575 25 


1,521 03 


53,096 28 


106,931 76 


7,670 32 


114,602 08 


Somerset 




26,047 64 


3,679 33 


29,726 97 


124,744 83 


3,427 47 


128,172 30 


Somerville 




7,691 74 


312 96 


8,004 70 


44,060 12 


479 95 


44,540 07 


Southampton 


1,516 70 


25 86 


1,542 56 


1,683 07 


1,790 86 


3,473 93 


Southborough 


10,055 72 


384 72 


10,440 44 


10,625 77 


1,163 46 


11,789 23 


Southbridge . 


4,390 53 


174 32 


4,564 85 


8,069 03 


1,324 68 


9,393 71 


South Hadley 


55,338 68 


1,863 07 


57,201 75 


55,018 18 


5,714 04 


60,732 22 


Spencer 


24,067 53 


757 65 


24,825 18 


22,670 10 


34,053 46 


56,723 56 


Sterling 




17,711 25 


3,173 60 


20,884 85 


14,809 72 


5,584 55 


20,394 27 


Stockbridge 




14,447 70 


1,208 58 


15,656 28 


28,196 58 


2,987 69 


31,184 27 


Stoneham 




13,475 69 


483 50 


13,959 19 


60,969 61 


2,627 29 


63,596 90 


Stoughton 




10,831 95 


977 24 


11,809 19 


48,140 56 


91,738 62 


139,879 18 


Stur bridge 




7,155 98 


339 81 


7,495 79 


11,544 90 


2,261 42 


13,806 32 


Sudbury 




35,914 28 


242 17 


36,156 45 


157,974 73 


1,573 94 


159,548 67 


Sunderland 




5,631 30 


368 15 


5,999 45 


25,692 89 


2,117 60 


27,810 49 


Sutton . 




9,992 03 


1,138 97 


11,131 00 


17,043 02 


3,054 96 


20,097 98 


Swampscott 




23,265 54 


190 50 


23,456 04 


21,715 64 


891 78 


22,607 42 


Swansea 




23,397 78 


4,375 24 


27,773 02 


76,392 64 


3,845 82 


80,238 46 


Taunton 




21,052 69 


2,260 07 


23,312 76 


70,633 76 


5,445 46 


76,079 22 


Templeton 




16,125 65 


2,084 29 


18,209 94 


48,430 29 


4,666 97 


53,097 26 


Tewksbury 




18,490 34 


328 86 


18,819 20 


159,407 44 


1,803 78 


161,211 22 


Tisbury 




5,989 28 


41 10 


6,030 38 


23,948 92 


874 30 


24,823 22 


Topsfield 




- 


- 


- 


- 


9 75 


9 75 


Townsend 




13,950 24 


982 89 


14,933 13 


32,264 37 


3,645 48 


35,909 85 


Truro 




13,592 58 


1,135 93 


14,728 51 


49,048 51 


74,522 49 


123,571 00 


Tyngsboroug 


i 


25,117 91 


2,573 46 


27,691 37 


29,600 24 


6,382 70 


35,982 94 


Upton . 




1,970 76 


2,113 14 


4,083 90 


2,047 02 


2,133 98 


4,181 00 


Uxbridge 




11,773 96 


2,061 89 


13,835 85 


16,073 69 


4,242 40 


20,316 09 


Wales 




2,309 64 


859 44 


3,169 08 


2,315 30 


850 18 


3,165 48 


Walpole 




22,132 58 


1,635 37 


23,767 95 


62,069 52 


4,779 37 


66,848 89 


Waltham 




— 


— 


- 


- 


23 34 


23 34 


Ware 




13,285 36 


1,508 36 


14,793 72 


12,707 43 


7,140 43 


19,847 86 


Wareham 




26,497 10 


2,088 01 


28,585 11 


94,468 83 


6,001 97 


100,470 80 


Warren . 




22,521 09 


832 77 


23,353 86 


119,768 72 


4,407 33 


124,176 05 


Washington 




- 


214 70 


214 70 


159 25 


842 40 


1,001 65 


Watertown 




9,047 37 


303 14 


9,350 51 


12,185 71 


40,825 21 


53,010 92 


Wayland 




42,941 85 


430 43 


43,372 28 


40,951 50 


1,162 46 


42,113 96 


Webster 




5,225 69 


652 44 


5,878 13 


13,428 85 


1,192 84 


14,621 69 


Wellesley 




6,210 65 


272 15 


6,482 80 


18,455 95 


382 26 


18,838 21 


Wellfleet 




13,526 80 


518 33 


14,045 13 


69,574 93 


39,002 23 


108,577 16 


Wenham 




14,045 00 


290 03 


14,335 03 


54,669 75 


1,054 77 


55,724 52 


Westborough 


7,536 70 


544 03 


8,080 73 


9,241 99 


1,543 68 


10,785 58 


West Boylston 


11,224 38 


788 65 


12,013 03 


43,995 20 


1,546 64 


45,541 84 


West Bridgewater . 


22,738 35 


308 52 


23,046 87 


10,860 09 


1,742 27 


12,602 36 


West Brookfield . 


18,785 60 


664 35 


19,449 95 


46,522 14 


73,453 94 


119,976 08 


Westfield 


38,283 74 


3,290 80 


41,574 54 


49,075 56 


16 846 29 


65,921 85 


Westford 


15,863 38 


2,763 45 


18,626 83 


19,370 62 


7,157 72 


26,528 34 


Westminster . 


32,290 50 


3,505 00 


35,795 50 


81,862 30 


5,807 29 


87,669 59 


West Newbury 


24,983 03 


1,194 45 


26,177 48 


21,354 96 


2,606 95 


23,961 91 


Weston . 


25,613 02 


495 07 


26,108 09 


43,289 68 


981 15 


44,270 83 


Westport 


39,693 10 


881 18 


40,574 28 


61,170 43 


2,893 71 


64,064 14 


West Springfield . 


11,585 18 


439 60 


12,024 78 


51,048 59 


3,025 41 


54,074 00 


West Tisbury 


6,389 25 


160 25 


6,549 50 


20,253 96 


9,007 63 


29,261 59 


Westwood 


12,980 59 


1,151 06 


14,131 65 


14,844 98 


1,529 63 


16,374 61 


Weymouth 




34,868 86 


2,078 38 


36,947 24 


101,012 37 


8,569 87 


109,582 24 


Whately 




16,287 88 


570 60 


16,858 48 


48,523 52 


1,863 15 


50,386 67 


Whitman 




7,048 49 


490 75 


7,539 24 


19,742 50 


1,912 88 


21,655 38 


Wilbraham 




27,499 15 


1,441 26 


28,940 41 


100,909 66 


5,817 68 


106,727 34 


Williamsburg 


9,467 14 


1,080 32 


10,547 46 


35,206 40 


3,971 27 


39,177 67 


Williamstown 


14,999 70 


926 37 


15,926 07 


44,376 98 


8,055 10 


52,432 08 


Wilmington . 


6,141 10 


709 95 


6,851 05 


75,529 10 


1,341 25 


76,870 35 


Winchendon 




16,049 59 


3,792 84 


19,842 43 


40,843 10 


8,533 53 


49,376 63 


Winchester 




12,896 62 


1,351 48 


14,248 10 


16,868 58 


45,461 83 


62,330 41 


Windsor 




2,710 73 


202 80 


2,913 53 


6,008 46 


990 26 


6,998 72 


Woburn 




14,854 95 


1,253 06 


16,108 01 


13,412 22 


67,929 59 


81,341 81 


Worcester 




34,168 72 


2,064 61 


36,233 33 


75,827 67 


4,702 47 


80,530 14 


Wrentham 




19,844 82 


3,032 37 


22,877 19 


69,321 32 


5,908 73 


75,230 05 


Yarmouth, North 1 
Yarmouth, South J 


24,269 05 


1,328 35 


25,597 40 


56,801 70 


2,867 12 


59,668 82 


Total 


- 


$4,209,091 18 


$367,697 00 


$4,576,788 18 


$10,877,487 63 


$2,252,002 87 


$13,129,490 50 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



51 





Expended per Mile 


in 1921. 
















Total 


Length 
under 

Mainte- 
nance 

(Miles). 












Amount 


Total 
expended. 


From 
Revenue 
Appro- 
priation. 


From Motor 

Vehicle 
Fees Fund. 


Total. 


Cost per 

Mile 
per Year. 


to be assessed 

on Cities 
and Towns. 


$32,087 23 


$151 11 


$516 67 


$667 78 


$537 03 


11.504 


$1,150 40 


52,496 62 


151 95 


609 88 


761 83 


824 61 


9.379 


1,366 60 


7,235 40 


94 01 


401 02 


495 03 


309 34 


3.618 


361 80 


167,698 36 


313 36 


1,580 21 


1,893 57 


1,554 89 


4.854 


970 80 


157,899 27 


370 94 


345 55 


716 49 


946 49 


9.919 


1,983 80 


52,544 77 


197 70 


303 19 


500 89 


2,965 11 


1.583 


396 46 


5,016 49 


36 53 


2,529 47 


2,566 00 


448 46 


.708 


35 40 


22,229 67 


104 23 


315 22 


419 45 


428 01 


3.691 


738 20 


13,958 56 


128 46 


976 18 


1,104 64 


580 83 


1.357 


749 50 


117,933 97 


252 99 


775 94 


1,028 93 


924 48 


7.364 


3,788 55 


81,548 74 


247 68 


11,132 22 


11,379 90 


1,556 00 


3.059 


611 80 


41,279 12 


389 02 


684 55 


1,073 57 


428 74 


8.158 


815 80 


46,840 55 


284 17 


702 49 


986 66 


973 65 


4.253 


850 60 


77,556 09 


305 63 


1,660 74 


1,966 37 


2,268 38 


1.582 


1,555 39 


151,688 37 


175 73 


16,496 78 


16,672 51 


2,141 52 


5.561 


4,378 00 


21,302 11 


144 42 


961 08 


1,105 50 


552 32 


2.353 


235 30 


195,705 12 


47 35 


307 77 


355 12 


1,887 72 


5.114 


511 40 


33,809 94 


92 71 


533 27 


625 98 


753 69 


3.971 


198 55 


31,228 98 


165 14 


442 94 


608 08 


595 78 


6.897 


689 70 


46,063 46 


127 77 


598 10 


725 87 


1,388 29 


1.491 


541 14 


108,011 48 


462 50 


406 53 


869 03 


1,062 02 


9.460 


1,892 00 


99,391 98 


212 57 


512 18 


724 75 


792 43 


10.632 


3,852 77 


71,307 20 


366 44 


820 49 


1,186 93 


806 18 


5.688 


1,137 60 


180,030 42 


53 16 


291 59 


344 75 


1,619 92 


6.186 


1,237 20 


30,853 60 

9 75 

50,842 98 


21 34 


453 94 


475 28 


607 27 


1.926 


385 20 


150 87 


559 55 


710 42 


442 06 


6.515 


651 50 


138,299 51 


112 55 


7,383 58 


7,496 13 


1,564 65 


10.093 


504 65 


63,674 31 


370 82 


919 70 


1,290 52 


550 50 


6.940 


347 00 


8,264 90 


407 39 


411 41 


818 80 


922 42 


5.187 


518 70 


34,151 94 


352 10 


724 45 


1,076 55 


506 45 


5.856 


3,152 14 


6,334 56 


168 52 


166 70 


335 22 


248 55 


5.100 


255 00 


90,616 84 


309 91 


905 70 


1,215 61 


799 09 


5.277 


3,207 37 


23 34 


— 


24 51 


24 51 


- 


.952 


11 67 


34,641 58 


221 75 


1,049 75 


1,271 50 


487 37 


6.802 


4,324 40 


129,055 91 


157 75 


453 46 


611 21 


888 12 


13.236 


4,044 99 


147,529 91 


168 58 


892 17 


1,060 75 


1,702 75 


4.940 


988 00 


1,216 35 


96 32 


377 93 


474 25 


455 05 


2.229 


111 45 


62,361 43 


356 64 


48,029 66 


48,386 30 


2,914 35 


.850 


1,700 00 


85,486 24 


150 50 


406 45 


556 95 


1,543 71 


2.860 


572 00 


20,499 82 


250 65 


458 26 


708 91 


779 75 


2.603 


922 64 


25,321 01 


231 42 


325 05 


556 47 


1,061 05 


1.176 


327 21 


122,622 29 


70 37 


5,294 90 


5,365 27 


1,360 82 


7.366 


368 30 


70,059 55 


164 60 


598 63 


763 23 


1,922 44 


1.762 


352 40 


18,866 31 


181 89 


516 11 


698 00 


353 13 


2.991 


598 20 


57,554 87 


183 27 


359 43 


542 70 


1,059 72 


4.303 


430 30 


35,649 23 


97 60 


551 18 


648 78 


583 01 


3.161 


316 10 


139,426 03 


236 09 


26,103 03 


26,339 12 


2,672 84 


2.814 


281 40 


107,496 39 


566 99 


2,902 53 


3,469 52 


814 36 


5.804 


5,540 57 


45,155 17 


558 39 


1,446 30 


2,004 69 


598 89 


4.949 


989 80 


123,465 09 


436 87 


723 83 


1,160 70 


1,014 45 


8.023 


802 30 


50,139 39 


233 97 


510 67 


744 64 


528 22 


5.105 


510 50 


70,378 92 


157 07 


311 28 


468 35 


1,015 45 


3.152 


738 11 


104,638 42 


188 69 


619 64 


808 33 


943 41 


4.670 


934 00 


66,098 78 


162.57 


1,118 86 


1,281 43 


1,395 37 


2.704 


1,732 50 


35,811 09 


29 91 


1,681 16 


1,711 07 


316 71 


5.358 


267 90 


30,506 26 


1,074 75 


1,428 23 


2,502 98 


1,354 39 


1.071 


214 20 


146,529 48 


228 02 


940 19 


1,168 21 


1,102 21 


9.115 


5,324 12 


67,245 15 


141 73 


462 78 


604 51 


937 79 


4.026 


201 30 


29,194 62 


122 99 


479 42 


602 41 


452 33 


3.990 


1,201 81 


135,667 75 


285 12 


1,150 88 


1,436 00 


1,325 14 


5.055 


1,011 00 


49,725 13 


403 10 


1,481 82 


1,884 92 


876 15 


2.680 


268 00 


68,358 15 


107 56 


935 33 


1,042 89 


1,362 15 


8.612 


1,701 00 


83,721 40 


193 02 


364 67 


557 69 


1,992 04 


3.678 


735 60 


69,219 06 


515 61 


1,160 08 


1,675 69 


1,711 43 


7.356 


1,471 20 


76,578 51 


692 36 


23,289 87 


23,982 23 


1,817 75 


1.952 


2,100 00 


9,912 25 


23 95 


116 97 


140 92 


190 34 


8.466 


325 15 


97,449 82 


178 04 


9,651 83 


9,829 87 


1,638 86 


7.038 


4,070 00 


116,763 47 


507 03 


1,154 83 


1,661 86 


1,368 81 


4.072 


3,383 54 


98,107 24 


318 66 


620 93 


939 59 


699 42 


9.516 


951 70 


85,266 22 


150 98 


325 88 


476 86 


390 37 


8.798 


1,759 60 


$17,706,278 68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,371.608 


$377,003 92 



52 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Highway Improvements authorized by Special Acts. 

The following contracts were entered into during the year 
for the construction of town ways under special acts of the 
Legislature: — 

Wesiborough. 

March 29, 1921, contract made with George E. Greenough 
of Acton for the construction of 2,730 feet of town road, under 
the provisions of chapter 536 of the Acts of 1920, the surface 
consisting of bituminous macadam 15 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $13,502.50. 

Work completed Aug. 16, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $14,000. 

Clinton. 

March 29, 1921, contract made with Fred E. Ellis of Melrose 
for the construction of 5,520 feet of town road, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 520 of the Acts of 1920, the surface consisting 
of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted 
to $28,445.50. 

Work completed July 12, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $29,661.03. 

Washington. 

March 29, 1921, contract made with the Luigi C. Carchia 
Company of Boston for the construction of 2.29 miles of town 
road, under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts 
of 1915, as amended, the surface consisting of bituminous 
macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $87,436.90. 

Work completed Nov. 15, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $79,947.16. 

Norton. 

April 5, 1921, contract made with Zebulon L. Canedy of 
Taunton for the construction of 3,600 feet of town road, under 
the provisions of chapter 348 of the General Acts of 1919, the 
surface consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $20,656.75. 

Work completed July 26, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $19,861.33. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 53 



Dracut. 

June 8, 1921, contract made with the Hanscom Construction 
Company of Boston for the construction of 3,100 feet of town 
road, under the provisions of chapter 340 of the General Acts 
of 1919, the surface consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $16,955. 

Work completed Sept. 27, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $20,354.72. 

Barre and Oakham. 

Aug. 2, 1921, contract made with the Canton Engineering 
Company, Inc., of Canton for the construction of 1.737 miles 
of town road in Barre and Oakham, under the provisions of 
chapter 221 of the General Acts of 1915, as amended, the sur- 
face consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $76,069.15. 

Work completed Dec. 20, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $67,885.47. 

Dalton and Windsor. 

Aug. 16, 1921, contract made with the Hassam Paving Com- 
pany of Worcester for the construction of 17,200 feet of town 
road, under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts 
of 1915, as amended, the surface consisting of bituminous 
macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted to $69,569.04. 

Work completed Nov. 22, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $61,753.69. 

Huntington. 
Aug. 16, 1921, contract made with the Holbrook, Cabot & 
Rollins Corporation of Boston for the construction of a rein- 
forced concrete arch bridge over the Westfield River, under the 
provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts of 1915, as 
amended. This contract covered the work previously included 
in a contract made with Cordner & Montague of Springfield, 
said contractors having been notified to discontinue the work, 



54 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

the chief engineer having certified in writing that the bridge 
work was unnecessarily and unreasonably delayed. 

Work completed Dec. 3, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $75,581.77. 

H olden. 

Aug. 23, 1921, contract made with George E. Greenough of 
Acton for the construction of 11,546 feet of town road, under 
the provisions of chapter 521 of the Acts of 1920, the surface 
consisting of bituminous macadam 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $52,329.80. On Sept. 27, 1921, this contract was 
extended to cover the construction of an additional length of 
4,500 feet of town road, under the provisions of section 34, 
chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Work about one-fourth completed. 

Expenditure during 1921, $19,306.53. 

Rutland. 

Aug. 3, 1921, contract made with Alexander Palladino of 
Newton for the construction of 1,525 feet of town road, under 
the provisions of chapter 337 of the General Acts of 1919, 
the surface consisting of gravel 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $6,252. 

Work completed Nov. 22, 1921. 

Expenditure during 1921, $6,809.03. 

Monterey. 

Sept. 20, 1921, contract made with the Hoyt Construction 
Company of Holyoke for the construction of 6,400 feet of town 
road, under the provisions of chapter 571 of the Acts of 1920, 
the surface consisting of gravel 18 feet wide. The proposal 
amounted to $17,327.50. 

Work not completed. 

Expenditure during 1921, $17,326.24. 

Middle field and Peru. 

Oct. 13, 1921, contract made with Carlo Bianchi & Co., Inc., 
of Framingham for the construction of 5,600 feet of town road 
in Middlefield and of 5,450 feet of town road in Peru, under 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 55 

the provisions of chapter 566 of the Acts of 1920, the surface 
consisting of hardpan 18 feet wide. The proposal amounted 
to $38,047.50. 
Expenditure during 1921, $5,971.13. 

Gill. 

Oct. 13, 1921, contract made with Antonio Pallatto of 
Dracut for the construction of 8,450 feet of town road, under 
the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts of 1915, as 
amended, the surface consisting of gravel 18 feet wide. The 
proposal amounted to $30,767. 

Work about one-third completed. 

Expenditure during 1921, $13,235.90. 

Ashfield. 

Nov. 1, 1921, contract made with Alexander Palladino of 
Newton for the construction of 8,646 feet of town road in Ash- 
field, under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts 
of 1915, as amended, the surface consisting of gravel 18 feet 
wide. The proposal amounted to $41,712.25. 

No work done or payments made in 1921. 

Plainfield and Cummington. 

Nov. 9, 1921, contract made with George T. Seabury, Inc., 
of Providence, R. I., for the construction of 7,800 feet of town 
road in Cummington and 13,333 feet of town road in Plainfield, 
under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts of 
1915, as amended, the surface consisting of gravel 18 feet wide. 
The proposal amounted to $77,805.25. 

Expenditure during 1921, $292.17. 



56 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



FEDERAL AID IN CONSTRUCTING HIGHWAYS. 

Section 30 of chapter 81 of the General Laws. 

An act to provide that the "United States shall aid the 
States in the construction of rural post roads, and for other 
purposes," was passed by Congress, and approved July 11, 1916, 
the Federal government appropriating and making available 
during the five following years the total amount of $75,000,000 
for use in aiding the States in the construction of certain roads 
agreed upon between the Secretary of Agriculture and the high- 
way departments of the various States. 

This act provided that one-half of the cost of constructing 
any project agreed upon between the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the State highway department shall be provided for from 
the State or local funds, and that the amount that the Federal 
government shall pay on any mile of road shall not exceed 
$10,000 a mile for its half, exclusive of the cost of bridges of 
more than 20 feet clear span. 

By chapter 67, General Acts of 1917, Massachusetts accepted 
the provisions of the act of Congress aforesaid, and a general 
scheme, comprising several different routes which the State 
proposed to adopt in the expenditure of Federal aid, was sub- 
mitted in March, 1917, and was approved by the Federal 
authorities. 

Chapter 18, General Acts of 1918, amended section 2 of 
chapter 67 aforesaid, and also provided that "the treasurer 
and receiver general is hereby authorized to receive from the 
United States any and all sums of money payable to this com- 
monwealth under any act of congress for the construction of 
any highways therein. The sums so received shall be expended 
upon the order or approval of the Massachusetts highway com- 
mission without specific appropriation." 

Special Acts of 1918, chapter 18, further authorized the 
Massachusetts Highway Commission "to expend during the 
years nineteen hundred and eighteen, nineteen hundred and 
nineteen and nineteen hundred and twenty the unexpended 
balance of the five million dollars authorized for the construc- 
tion of state highways by chapter seven hundred and four of 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 57 

the acts of nineteen hundred and twelve, and the unexpended 
balances of such appropriations or authorizations as have been 
heretofore made by the general court for the construction of 
specific highways or routes, in accordance with the several pro- 
visions of law originally authorizing said expenditures." 

Chapter 89, General Acts of 1919, further amended chapter 
67, General Acts of 1917, as amended by chapter 18, General 
Acts of 1918, by adding a new section providing that "the 
Massachusetts highway commission is hereby authorized to 
make any agreements or contracts that may be required to 
secure federal aid in the construction of highways under the 
provisions of the act of congress aforesaid, and of all other acts 
in amendment thereof, or in addition thereto, and may, in such 
agreements or contracts, provide, among other things, for such 
labor preferences to honorably discharged soldiers, sailors and 
marines as are made necessary by federal legislation, and may 
provide that no other preference or discrimination among citi- 
zens of the United States shall be made in connection with the 
expenditure of any money received from the federal govern- 
ment by virtue of the said legislation.' , 

Chapter 81 of the General Laws provides in section 30 that 
'"The division may make all contracts and agreements and do 
all other things necessary to co-operate with the United States 
in the construction and maintenance of rural highways, under 
an act of congress approved on July eleventh, nineteen hundred 
and sixteen, entitled 'An Act to provide that the United States 
shall aid the states in the construction of rural post roads, and 
for other purposes', and submit such plans, estimates and 
programs for the improvement of highways as will meet the 
requirements of the secretary of agriculture under said act, 
and it may use therefor any funds which may be available for 
the construction and maintenance of state highways, and may 
make any agreements or contracts that may be required to 
secure federal aid in the construction of highways under the 
provisions of the act of congress aforesaid, and of all other acts 
in amendment thereof, or in addition thereto, and may, in such 
agreements or contracts, provide, among other things, for such 
labor and preferences to honorably discharged soldiers, sailors 
and marines as are made necessary by federal legislation, and 



58 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

may provide that no other preference or discrimination among 
citizens of the United States shall be made in connection with 
the expenditure of any money received from the federal govern- 
ment by virtue of the said legislation, and also any money 
received from the United States on account of the construction 
of highways. The division may also, for the purpose of secur- 
ing federal aid, use any money appropriated by a county, city 
or town for the construction of a way or any part thereof for 
which federal aid may be secured, and make contracts or 
agreements involving the expenditure of said money, provided 
the county commissioners or the selectmen or duly authorized 
officials of the city or town have agreed in writing to pay the 
money thus appropriated upon the order of the division. The 
division may also maintain the roads constructed under this 
section or said act of congress, from any money appropriated 
by the general court for the maintenance of state highways or 
for the repair or maintenance of other public ways." 

The act of Congress, approved July 11, 1916, was amended 
by an "Act making appropriations for the services of the Post 
Office Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, and 
for other purposes," approved Feb. 28, 1919. Under the 
amended act additional amounts were appropriated as follows: 
the sum of $50,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919; 
$75,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920; $75,000,- 
000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921. 

The act of 1919 also provided that section 6 of said act of 
Congress, approved July 11, 1916, "be further amended so 
that the limitation of payments not to exceed $10,000 per mile, 
exclusive of the cost of bridges of more than twenty feet clear 
span, which the Secretary of Agriculture may make, be, and 
the same is, increased to $20,000 per mile." 

Further legislation is contained in the Federal Highway Act, 1 
approved Nov. 9, 1921, amending the act of Congress approved 
July 11, 1916, as amended by the act approved Feb. 28, 1919. 

The Federal Highway Act aforesaid provides that the 
Secretary of Agriculture, after making the deduction authorized 
by section 2 of said act, shall apportion the remainder of the 
appropriation made for expenditure under the provisions of 

1 Printed in the Appendix to this report, pages 107-115. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 59 

the act for the fiscal year among the several States in the 
following manner: — 

One-third in the ratio which the area of each State bears to the total 
area of all the States; one-third in the ratio which the population of each 
State bears to the total population of all the States, as shown by the 
latest available Federal census; one-third in the ratio which the mileage 
of rural delivery routes and star routes in each State bears to the total 
mileage of rural delivery and star routes in all the States at the close of 
the next preceding fiscal year, as shown by the certificate of the Post- 
master-General, which he is directed to make and furnish annually to 
the Secretary of Agriculture. 

It appears from a certificate of the Secretary of Agriculture, 
dated Nov. 18, 1921, that of the appropriation of $75,000,000 
made by the Federal Highway Act aforesaid for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1922, $25,000,000 is made immediately avail- 
able and $50,000,000 is to become available Jan. 1, 1922, and 
after deducting $1,875,000, estimated to be necessary for ad- 
ministering the provisions of said act, the sum apportioned to 
Massachusetts as immediately available is $365,392.01, and the 
sum to become available Jan. 1, 1922, is $730,784.03, making 
the total apportionment to Massachusetts under said act 
$1,096,176.04. 

The total of the apportionments under previous acts of 
Congress was $4,052,565.09, making a total apportionment to 
this State (including the sum available Jan. 1, 1922) of $5,148,- 
741.13. 

The total amount received by Massachusetts from 1916 to 
Nov. 30, 1921, was $1,092,258.74. 

Projects to the number of 30 have been prepared in addi- 
tion to those shown in the report of the Department for 1920. 
The total mileage included in the various Federal-aid road 
projects in this State, from the commencement of work of this 
character to Nov. 30, 1921, inclusive, was 250.949. The 
mileage in the various counties is : — 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



County. 



Miles. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire 
Bristol 
Essex . 
Franklin 
Hampden 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Worcester . 
Total . 



30.605 
29.078 

7.054 
46.665 
15.961 
15.992 
14.644 
28.302 
12.546 

9.196 

40.906 

250.949 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



61 



Statement of Federal-aid Road Projects. 



No. 


Town. 


Miles. 


Amount of 

Federal Aid 

involved. 


Amount 
received. 


Remarks. 


1 


Acushnet-Fairhaven 


2.182 


$21,820 00 


$21,820 00 


Work completed. 


2 


Hanover .... 


2.708 


19,480 36 


19,480 36 


Work completed. 


3 


Malden-Melrose-Saugus 


1.162 


11,620 00 


11,620 00 


Work completed. 


4 


Danvers 


1.325 


15,460 22 


15,460 22 


Work completed. 


5 


Windsor-Dalton 


3.240 


59,216 30 


41,665 19 


Work completed. 


6 


Sandwich .... 


1.818 


10,678 02 


10,678 02 


Work completed. 


7 


Cummington .... 


4.659 


86,816 53 


33,540 52 


Work completed. 


8 


Athol-Petersham . 


7.016 


90,074 51 


90,074 51 


Work completed. 


9 


Saugus 


3.122 


65,472 27 


34,865 79 


Work completed. 


10 


Braintree .... 


2.420 


40,554 80 


30,819 23 


Work completed. 


11 


Concord- Acton-Littleton 


4.849 


77,600 87 


77,600 87 


Work completed. 


12 


Ipswich 


2.173 


21,851 50 


21,851 50 


Work completed. 


13 


Littleton-Groton . 


6.450 


130,504 25 


88,987 52 


Work completed. 


14 


Barnstable .... 


3.331 


22,687 65 


18,991 54 


Work completed. 


15 


Norwell-Hingham . 


4.380 


59,501 75 


48,957 32 


Work completed. 


17 


Ly n n field-Peabody 


1.794 


35,880 00 


- 


Work completed. 


18 


Lunenburg .... 


2.797 


55,940 00 


33,903 53 


Work completed. 


19 


Taunton .... 


2.116 


42,320 00 


22,982 74 


Work completed. 


20 


Tewksbury .... 


2.909 


35,211 82 


26,098 73 


Work completed. 


21 


Pittsfield-Hancock 


3.637 


72,740 00 


45,587 06 


Work completed. 


22 


Greenfield-Bernardston 


6.426 


88,270 71 


31,294 14 


Work completed. 


23 


Great Barrington . 


2.123 


31,348 89 


31,348 89 


Work completed. 


24 


Seekonk 


2.756 


19,527 75 


19,527 75 


Work completed. 


25 


Billerica 


.578 


38,389 77 


7,573 20 


Work completed. 


26 


Greenfield-Shelburne : 












Section 1 


5.134 


102,680 00 


46,190 57 


Work completed. 




Section 2 


4.401 


88,020 00 » 


- 


Project approved. 


27 


Hamilton-Wenham 


1.766 


20,207 27 


20,207 27 


Work completed. 


28 


Lanesborough: 












Section A 


.990 


19,780 00 


15,626 41 


Work completed. 




Section B 


2.680 


53,800 00 » 


- 


Project approved. 


29 


Ware 


2.626 


46,557 55 


26,112 27 


Work completed. 


30 


Brim field . 


4.238 


75,889 00 » 


- 


Project approved. 


31 


Danvers-Peabody . 


1.107 


22,140 00 


17,222 31 


Work completed. 


32 


Huntington .... 


3.078 


102,103 37 1 


25,828 43 


Work under way. 



Signed agreements. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Statement of Federal-aid Road Projects — Continued. 



No. 


Town. 


Miles. 


Amount of 

Federal Aid 

involved. 


Amount 
received. 


Remarks. 


33 


Acton-Littleton : 












Section A . 


2.182 


$43,640 00 l 


- 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


1.624 


25,847 25i 


- 


Work completed. 


34 


Dudley 


1.359 


27,180 00 


$20,813 97 


Work completed. 


35 


Haverhill-Methuen 


4.544 


90,880 00 


- 


Project approved. 


36 


Eastham-Wellfleet-Truro- 
Provincetown: 
Section A . 


10.690 


91,347 85 


74,237 30 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


6.719 


75,935 60 ' 


- 


Project approved. 




Section C . 


8.047 


86,130 51 1 


- 


Work under way. 


37 


Egremont .... 


1.164 


20,579 07 


20,579 07 


Work under way. 


38 


Peabody-Danvers . 


2.827 


56,540 00 * 


- 


Work completed. 


39 


Williamstown-New Ashford- 
Lanesborough: 
Section A . 


.020 


14,132 25 > 


_ 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


3.323 


66,460 00 


- 


Project approved. 




Section C 


4.560 


91,200 00 


- 


Project approved. 


40 


East Brookfield 


1.011 


20,220 00 » 


- 


Work completed. 


41 


Ashby 


1.250 


22,141 03 


$15,956 92 


Work completed. 


42 


Washington .... 


2.291 


45,820 00 


14,998 52 


Work completed. 


43 


Leicester .... 


.638 


12,760 00 


9,757 07 


Work completed. 


44 


Goshen- Cummington- Wind- 












sor; 
Section A . . . . 


1.494 


29,880 00 


- 


Project approved. 




Section B . . . . 


1.479 


50,538 14 


- 


Project approved. 




Section C . . . . 


3.780 


82,915 42 


- 


Project approved. 


45 


Palmer: 












Sections A and C 


1.795 


35,900 00 1 


- 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


.530 


10,600 00 


- 


Project approved. 


46 


Upton-Hopedale : 












Section A . 


1.672 


33,440 00 » 


- 


Work completed. 




Section B . . . . 


2.589 


51,780 00 


- 


Project approved. 


47 


Barre-Oakham 


1.737 


38,037 25i 


- 


Work under way. 


49 


Middleborough 


2.108 


25,461 70 


- 


Project approved. 


50 


Lunenburg .... 


1.763 


35,260 00 


- 


Project approved. 


51 


Mendon-Uxbridge : 












Section A . 


1.959 


39,180 001 


- 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


2.504 


50,080 00 


- 


Project approved. 



Signed agreements. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



63 



Statement of Federal-aid Road Projects — Concluded. 



No. 


Town. 


Miles. 


Amount of 

Federal Aid 

involved. 


Amount 
received. 


Remarks. 


52 




3 208 


$64,160 00 1 


- 


Work completed. 


53 


East Brookfield-Spencer-West 
Brookfield-Brookfield : 
Section A . 


.890 


17,800 00 * 


_ 


Work completed. 




Section B . 


1.682 


33,640 00 » 


- 


Work completed. 


54 


Leicester: 












Section A 


.829 


16,580 00 > 


- 


Work completed. 




Section B . . 


2.691 


53,820 00 


- 


Project approved. 


55 


Quincy 


.549 


10,980 00 1 


- 


Work completed. 


56 


Stoughton .... 


2.141 


42,820 00 * 


- 


Work completed. 


57 


Winchester- Woburn 


3.042 


59,131 31i 


- 


Work completed. 


58 


Littleton .... 


1.345 


26,900 00 » 


- 


Work completed. 


59 


Egremont .... 


.784 


15,680 00 * 


- 


Work under way. 


60 


Middleton-Danvers 


1.907 


38,224 70 » 


- 


Work completed. 


61 


Winchendon-Templeton 


5.393 


107,860 00 1 


- 


Work under way. 


62 


Danvers-Topsfield : 












Section A . . . . 


3.009 


60,180 001 


- 


Project approved. 




Section B . . . . 


3.513 


83,347 62 


- 


Project approved. 


63 


Essex-Ipswich 


4.489 


89,780 00 


- 


Project approved. 


64 


Norwood .... 


1.065 


21,300 00 


- 


Project approved. 


65 


North Adams 


1.638 


32,760 00 » 


- 


Work completed. 


66 
69 


Uxbridge .... 
Haverhill .... 


1.168 

2.657 


23,360 00 
53,140 00 


— 


Project approved, 67 
and 68 withdrawn. 
Project approved. 


70 




?, 550 


51,000 00 


- 


Project approved. 


71 


Wrentham .... 


1.846 


36,940 00 


- 


Project approved. 


72 




3 078 


61,560 00 


- 


Project approved. 


73 


Southwick .... 


6.879 


135,027 64 


- 


Project approved. 


74 




156 


16,233 38 


- 


Project forwarded. 


75 


Topsfield-Ipswich-Rowley- 
Newbury: 
Section A 


10.207 


207,919 00 


_ 


Project forwarded. 




Section B . 


.350 


7,000 00 


- 


Project forwarded. 


76 


Norfolk . 


1.447 


28,940 00 


- 


Project forwarded. 


77 


Merrimac .... 


1.025 


20,400 00 


- 


Project forwarded. 


78 


Burlington . 

Total . . . . 


3.761 


75,220 00 


- 


Project forwarded. 




250.949 


$4,449,734 88 


$1,092,258 74 





1 Signed agreements. 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



BRIDGES. 

During the year the Division has prepared designs and plans 
for, and done other work relating to, bridges throughout the 
Commonwealth. The various towns, the localities therein, the 
character of the structure and other details are as follows: — 



Bridges built or contracted for. 



Town. 



Locality. 



Character of Structure. 



Barre . 

Barre . 

Bernardston 

Cummington 

Cummington 

Huntington 

Lanesborough 

Leicester 

Littleton 

Littleton 



Middleton (Dan vers 

line). 
New Ashford 



New Ashford 
New Ashford 
New Ashford 
New Ashford 
New Ashford 
New Ashford 
Norton 
Oxford 
Ware . 
Ware . 
Washington 
Williamstown 
Williamstown 
Winchendon 
Winchendon 
Winchendon 
Woburn 



Over canal . 
Over Ware River 
Over Couch Brook 

Over east branch of West- 
field River. 

Over north branch of Swift 
River. 

Over Westfield River 

Over Town Brook 
At Collier's Corner 
Over Beaver Brook 
Over Beaver Brook 
Over Ipswich River 
Over brook . 

Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over east branch of Green 

River. 
Over Main Street Flume . 



Over Muddy River 

Over Flat Brook 

Over west branch of West- 
field River. 
Over New Ashford Brook 

Over Roaring Brook . 

Over Millers River 

Over branch of Millers River 

Over branch of Otis River 

Over brook . 



24-foot concrete slab. 

30-foot concrete beam. 

35-foot concrete beam. 

100-foot concrete arch. 

32-foot concrete beam. 

3-span concrete arch, 1 of 75 feet and 2 of 

55 feet each. 
18-foot concrete beam. 

Concrete retaining wall. 

15-foot concrete slab. 

24-foot concrete beam. 

34-foot concrete beam. 

12-foot concrete slab. 

16-foot concrete beam. 

23^-foot concrete beam. 

16-foot concrete beam. 

16-foot concrete beam. 

28-foot concrete beam. 

24-foot concrete beam. 

11-foot concrete slab. 

Head wall for arch culvert. 

201-foot concrete beam. 

13-foot concrete slab. 

16-foot concrete beam. 

30-foot concrete beam. 

13|-foot concrete slab. 

40-foot wooden pile. 

16-foot concrete beam. 

8-foot concrete culvert. 

8-foot concrete slab. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



65 



Alterations, Repairs and Extensions to Bridges completed in 

1921. 



Town. 


Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Brookfield . 


Over Stone Brook 


Extending 11-foot concrete slab. 


Buckland (Charlemont 

line). 
Fall River . 

Granby 


Scott's bridge 

Over Taunton Great River, 
Brightman Street bridge. 


Cleaning and painting. 
Cleaning and painting. 
Repairing wooden truss bridge. 


Lanesborough 


Over Town Brook 


Extension of 18-foot concrete beam. 


Newburyport (Salis- 
bury line). 
North Adams 


Over Merrimack River 
Greylock bridge . 


Repairs to fender pier. 
Cleaning and painting. 


Oxford 

West Brookfield . 


Over French or Maanexet 

River. 
Over Tannery Brook . 


Extension of 16-foot concrete arch. 
Extension of 20-foot concrete beam. 



Contemplated Bridges and Structures. 
Plans, Studies or Estimates made. 



Town. 


Locality. 


Character of Structures. 


Becket 


Over Sparks Brook 


Extension of 13-foot concrete beam. 


Becket 
Becket 
Becket 
Bernardston 


Over west branch Of West- 
field River. 

Over west branch of West- 
field River. 

Over west branch of West- 
field River. 

Over Falls River 


35-foot concrete beam. 
255-foot concrete beam. 
25-foot concrete beam. 
60-foot concrete arch. 


Bourne 

Cummington 
Cummington 


Over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road. 

Over east branch of West- 
field River. 

Over Westfield River . 


345-foot concrete beam. 

80-foot concrete arch. 
38-foot concrete beam. 


Cummington 

Essex .... 


Over branch of Westfielc 

River. 
One causeway 


36-foot concrete beam. 
Riprap on work. 


Falmouth . 


Over Coonemosset River 


125-foot concrete slab. 


Gill .... 


Over brook . 


11-foot concrete slab. 


Goshen 


Over Stones Brook 


30-foot concrete beam. 


Goshen 


Over Swift River 


33-foot concrete beam. 


Grafton 


Over brook . 


12-foot concrete slab. 


Haverhill . 


Amesbury Road 


Retaining wall. 


Hingham 


Otis and Summer streets 


Retaining wall and 2-span concrete beam. 


Rowley (Newbury- 
port Turnpike). 
Southwick . 


Over Mill River . 
Over brook . 


Concrete extension of 18-foot stone arch. 
13a-foot concrete beam. 


Southwick . 


Over Uncle Oliver's Brool 


; 235-foot concrete beam. 



06 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contemplated Bridges and Structures — Continued. 
Plans, Studies or Estimates made — Concluded. 



Town. 



Locality. 



Character of Structure. 



Sutton 

Topsfield (Newbury- 

port Turnpike). 
Topsfield (Newbury- 

port Turnpike). 
Topsfield (Newbury- 

port Turnpike). 
Topsfield (Newbury- 

port Turnpike). 
Topsfield (Newbury- 

port Turnpike). 
Wayland 

Westfield . 

Windsor 



Over Cold Spring Brook 



Over Ipswich River . 

Over Howlett Street . 

Over Mile Brook 

Over Sudbury River . 

Over Westfield River . 

Over branch of Housatonic 
River. 



14-foot concrete beam. 

Concrete retaining wall. 

6-foot by 9-foot concrete culvert and 3.5- 
foot by 5-foot cattle pass. 
Concrete alteration to 32-foot stone arch. 

20-foot concrete beam. 

10-foot concrete slab. 

80-foot 2-span concrete beam. 

35-foot concrete beam; also strengthen- 
ing the present Frog Hole bridge. 
Addition to fence. 



Examinations, Reports, Estimates, etc., made at the Request of Cities and 

Towns. 



Cities and Towns. 



Locality. 



Character of Work. 



Acton 1 

Ashland 1 

Belchertown (Ware 
line). 

Dana .... 

Dedham 

Dighton (Somerset 

line). 
East Bridgewater l 

Eastham 

Framingham 

Huntington 

Maynard 

M iddleborough ( Br idge- 

water line). 
Newbury . 

Northbridge 



Orange 
Pembroke . 
Plymouth . 

Shelburne (Buckland 

line). 
Somerset (Swansea 

line). 



Over Assabet River . 
Over Sudbury River . 
Over Swift River 

Over Ware River 

Over Mother Brook, Wash- 
ington Street. 
Over Broad Cove 

Over Salisbury River, Pleas- 
ant Street. 
Over Broad Meadow Creek . 

Over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road, Fountain Street. 
Over Westfield River . 

Over Assabet River 

Over Taunton River . 

Over Plum Island River 

Over Blackstone River 

At Slovan's Mill . 
Furnace and Oldham ponds 
Over Eel River . 
Over Deerfield River . 
Over Lee River . 



2-span concrete through girder; spans 

32 feet each. 
25-foot concrete beam. 

Examination and report on Red bridge; 

investigation of stresses of 38-foot 

wooden "A" frame. 
19-foot concrete beam; alternate, of 

wood. 
19-foot concrete beam. 

2-span concrete beam, 28 feet each. 

30-foot concrete beam, and restoration of 

16-foot stone arch at Central Street. 
For repairing present bridge. 

Condition of bridge. 

Condition of bridge. 

Widening of stone arch, 2 spans of 27 feet 
each. 

Woodard's bridge, and Titicut (or 
Sturtevant's) bridge. 

Condition of bridge and reconstruction 
necessary. 

2-span concrete beam, 39 feet each; al- 
ternate, 1-span concrete arch, 78 feet; 
alternate, 2-span concrete beam, 47 feet 
each. 

Condition of bridge and reconstruction. 

6-foot by 5-foot concrete slab culvert. 

27^-foot concrete beam; alternate, with 

abutment of plain concrete. 
22-foot iron truss. 

Condition of bridge. 



1 Construction supervision. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



67 



Contemplated Bridges and Structures — Continued. 

Examinations, Reports, Estimates, etc., made at the Request of Cities and 

Towns — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 



Locality. 



Character of Work. 



Sunderland (Deerfield 

line). 
Taunton 



Townsend 
Uxbridge 
Walpole 
Walpole 

West Stockbridge 
Woburn l 



Over Connecticut River 
Over Taunton River . 
Over Willard Brook 
Over Blackstone River 

Washington Street, Mill 
Pond. 

Over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road. 

Over Williams River . 

Over Aberjona River . 



Strengthening floor. 

Advice to city officials. 

Condition of bridge and reconstruction. 

Analysis of truss. 

Restoration of 2-span stone arch, spans 

15 and 16 feet, respectively. 
Condition of floor and repaving with 

creosoted wood block. 

Condition of bridge and reconstruction. 
18-foot concrete beam. 



1 Construction supervision. 

Examinations, Reports, Estimates, etc., in Accordance with Certain 

Legislation. 



Cities and Towns. 


Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Gloucester . 
Wilbraham . 


Over Lobster Cove (ch. 52, 

Res. of 1920). 
Underpass, Boston & Albany 

Railroad (ch. 72, Res. of 

1920). 


Condition of present bridge; plans and 
estimates for new structure. 

Examination of site and study of pro- 
posed designs. 



Examinations, Reports, Estimates, etc., at the Request of County Commis- 
sioners. 



Cities and Towns. 


Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Dover (Needham line) 

Dracut 

Gloucester . 

Hadley (Northampton 

line). 
Norfolk 

Williamsburg (Hayden- 
ville Underpass). 


Over Charles River 
Over Beaver Brook 
Good Harbor Beach . 
Over Connecticut River 
Over Stop River 


A 2-span concrete beam, spans 65 feet 
each; alternate, 65-foot concrete arch. 

2-span wall and arch extension, spans 12 
feet each. 

Plans submitted for beam and slab 
bridges. 

Strength of floor. 

92-foot concrete arch. 

Condition and study of reconstruction. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contemplated Bridges and Structures — Concluded. 
Examinations and Reports by Direction of the Department. 



Cities and Towns. 


Locality. 


Subject. 


Brookfield . 


Dunn Brook bridge . 


Damage by truck. 


Cummington 


Old covered wooden bridge 


Condition of bridge. 


Newbury . 


Over Parker River 


Condition of bridge. 


Norfolk 


Main Street culvert . 


Damage by truck. 


North Adams 


Culvert .... 


Raising head walls. 


North Adams 


Over Hoosic River 


Condition of bridge. 


Russell 


- 


Reconstruction of retaining wall. 


Shelburne (Buckland 

line). 
Truro .... 


Over Deerfield River . 


Cleaning and painting bridge. 


Pamet River 


Culvert, tidal flow. 


Upton 


Flume 


Reconstruction. 


Waltham 


Doubl e culvert . 


Condition. 


Wareham (Marion line) 
Westminster 


Over Buttermilk Bay 
Three bridges 


Condition of old bridge being used dur- 
ing construction of new bridge. 
Condition. 



Bridge over the Merrimack River between Newbury- 

port and Salisbury. 

The charge of this bridge was placed in the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission, and the same made a State highway by 
the provisions of chapter 716, Acts of 1912, which also pro- 
vided that the expense of keeping the bridge in good repair for 
travel, of operating the draw, and of maintaining the bridge 
shall be paid by the Commonwealth. 

The total number of draw openings at this bridge from 
January to December, inclusive, during each of the years 
1918-21, were: — 





Year. 


Openings. 


1918 . 




223 


1919 : 




209 


1920 . 




199 


1921 . 




329 



The expenditures for 1921 were $7,253.83. 
The total expenditure from 1912 to 1921, inclusive, was 
$69,957.44. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 69 

Bridge over Taunton Great River between Fall River 

and Somerset. 

The charge of this bridge was placed in the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission, and the same made a State highway by 
the provisions of chapter 717, Acts of 1912, which also pro- 
vided that the expense of keeping the bridge in good repair for 
travel, and of operating the draw and maintaining the bridge, 
shall be paid by the Commonwealth; furthermore, that the 
expense incurred and to be incurred by the county of Bristol in 
restoring the bridge to a sound condition and in making it 
suitable for travel shall be borne by the Commonwealth. 

The total number of draw openings at this bridge from 
January to December, inclusive, during each of the years 
1918-21, were: — 





Year. 


Openings. 


1918 . 




759 


1919 . 




657 


1920 . 




1,860 


1921 . 




2,539 



The expenditures for 1921 were $16,863.57. 
The total expenditure from 1912 to 1921, inclusive, was 
$155,572.80. 



70 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR OF TOWN AND COUNTY 

WAYS. 

Chapter 90 of the General Laws was amended by section 1 
of chapter 112 of the Acts of 1921, as follows: — 

Section 1. Chapter ninety of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by striking out section thirty-four and inserting in place thereof the 
following: — Section 34- The fees and fines received under the preceding 
sections, together with all other fees received by the registrar or any 
other person under the laws of the commonwealth relating to the use 
and operation of motor vehicles, shall be paid by the registrar or by the 
person collecting the same into the treasury of the commonwealth. Out 
of said fees and fines there shall be appropriated such amount as is neces- 
sary to carry out the provisions of law regulating the use of motor vehicles. 
The balance then remaining may be appropriated for expenditure under 
the direction of the division for maintaining, repairing, improving and 
constructing town and county highways together with any money which 
any town or county may appropriate for said purpose to be used on the 
same highway, and said way shall remain a town or county way; for 
expenditure under the direction of the division for maintaining, repairing 
and improving state highways, and for constructing state highways to 
an amount not exceeding that part of the cost thereof which is not assessed 
upon the counties under the provisions of section nine of chapter eighty- 
one; and for meeting the commonwealth's share of the expenses of the 
metropolitan district commission for maintaining boulevards in the 
metropolitan parks district under section fifty-six of chapter ninety-two. 

During the year the Division has contracted for work to be 
done in the towns named in the following table, which also 
shows the type of road, the length contracted for, and the 
allotments or contributions by the State, towns and counties: — 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



71 



Counties and 


Contributions. 






Length 
Con-. 


Towns. 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


Type of Road. 


tracted for 

(Feet). 


Barnstable County. 












Brewster . 


$3,000 00 


$3,000 00 


- 


Bituminous concrete 


6,000 


Falmouth 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


- 


Bituminous concrete 


4,000 


Sandwich 


1,000 00 


1 ,000 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,600 


Berkshire County. 










Alford . 


400 00 


400 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


200 


Becket 


300 00 


300 00 


- 


Gravel 




600 


Egremont 


1,000 00 


1 ,000 00 


- 


Gravel 




1,095 


Hancock . 


2,000 00 


- 


- 


Gravel 




6,189 


Monterey 


400 00 


400 00 


- 


Gravel 




1,200 


New Marlborough . 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


$1,000 00 


Gravel 




5,535 


Otis .... 


500 00 


500 00 


- 


Gravel 




18,500 


Richmond 


1,500 00 


1 ,000 00 


- 


Gravel 




900 


Sheffield . 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Repair and oiling 




16,100 


Tyringham 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Waterbound macadam 


1,000 


West Stockbridge 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,900 


. Bristol County. 








Berkley . 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


Repair and oiling 


33,205 


Dartmouth 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,650 


Dighton 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Waterbound macadam 


1,884 


Dighton . 




5,000 00 


6,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,750 


Easton 




4,000 00 


4,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


1,785 


Mansfield 




7,500 00 


7,500 00 


7,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,406 


Rehoboth 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


7,251 


Seekonk 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,350 


Swansea . 




2,750 00 


2,750 00 


2,750 00 


Waterbound macadam 


1,575 


Westport . 




1 ,500 00 


3,000 00 


1,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,470 


Essex County. 












Andover . 




7,018 29 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,200 


Danvers . 




10,000 00 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,306 


Essex 




1,000 00 


2,500 00 


- 


Repair and oiling 


31,680 


Georgetown 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Gravel . . . . 


4,300 


Ipswich 




4,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


Gravel . 


19,600 


Lynnfield 




10,000 00 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,726 


Marblehead 




20,000 00 


40,000 00 


20,000 00 


Bituminous madacam 


11,053 


Rowley . 




500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel . . . . 


750 


Swampscott 




7,500 00 


15,000 00 


7,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,750 


West Newbury 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel 


1,700 

















72 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 





Contributions. 
Counties and 


Type of Road. 


Length 
Con- 


Towns . 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Franklin Cou 


<ity. 










Ashfield . 


$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


Gravel .... 


1,400 


Bernardston 


8,000 00 


8,000 00 


- 


Bituminous madcadam . 


1,750 


Buckland 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


- 


Gravel 




1,000 


Colrain 


1.600 00 


1,600 00 


- 


Gravel 




2,750 


Conway . 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


- 


Gravel 




1,400 


Montague 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Gravel . . 




5,500 


Orange 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Gravel 




1,600 


Shelburne 


400 00 


400 00 


- 


Repair and oiling 




8,504 


Warwick . 


400 00 


400 no 


- 


Gravel 




400 


Wendell . 


500 00 


500 )0 


= — 


Gravel 




450 


Hampden Cou 


nty. 








Agawam . 


20,000 00 


20,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


5,860 


Blandford 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Waterbound macadam 


975 


Chester . 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


2,050 


East Longmeac 


ow . 500 00 


500 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,700 


Monson 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,100 


Southwick 


500 00 


500 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


600 


Tolland . 


300 00 


300 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


350 


West Spring fie 1 


& . 10.000 00 


20,000 00 


- 


Cement concrete 


2,200 


Wilbraham 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


2,200 


Hampshire Co 


unty. 










Belchertown 


2,000 00 


3,200 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,850 


Easthampton 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


1,500 


Hadley 


. 15,000 00 


15 : 000 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


9,500 


Prescott . 

Southampton 


400 00 
500 00 


400 00 
500 00 


- 


Concrete culvert and ap- 
proaches. 
Gravel .... 


250 
600 


Middlesex Co 


■inty. 










Acton 


. 10,000 00 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


4,400 


Ashby 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel . 


2,000 


Ashland . 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,326 


Ashland . 
Bedford . 


2,500 00 
1,000 00 


2,500 00 
1,000 00 


2,500 00 
1,000 00 


Concrete bridge and ap- 
proaches. 
Gravel . 


534 
1,500 


Bedford . 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,400 


Boxborough 


700 00 


700 00 


700 00 


Gravel . 


800 


Burlington 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


Repair and oiling 


17,160 


Burlington 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel . 


2,300 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



73 



Counties and 


Contributions. 


Type of Road. 


Length 
Con- 


Towns. 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 
(Feet). 


Middlesex County — 
Con. 












Carlisle . 


$5C0 00 


$500 00 


$500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,500 


Chelmsford 


12,000 00 


12,000 00 


12,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


5,800 


Dracut 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


750 


Dunstable 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


Repair and oiling 


38,016 


Framingham . 


7,000 00 


7,000 00 


7,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,400 


Framingham . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


4,300 


Holliston . ' . 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


Gravel .... 


4,000 


Hopkinton 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Waterbound macadam 


2,000 


Hudson . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


5,600 


Lincoln . 


7,500 00 


7,500 00 


7,500 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,286 


Littleton . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


1 Bituminous macadam . 
\ Gravel .... 


576 
6,500 


Maynard . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


4,000 


Natick 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


1,900 


North Reading 


900 00 


900 00 


900 00 


Repair and oiling 


49,840 


Sherborn . 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


2,700 


Stoneham 


1,700 00 


1,700 00 


1,700 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,310 


Stow 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,300 


Stow 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,000 


Sudbury . 


598 .43 


598 43 


598 43 


Repair and oiling 


29,830 


Sudbury . 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


4,000 


Tyngsborough 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,320 


Wakefield 


2,000 00 


' 2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


1,000 


Wayland . 


2,700 00 


2,700 00 


2,700 00 


Bituminous macadam 


654 


Wayland . 
Westford . . 
Wilmington 


2,500 00 
5,000 00 

2,000 00 


7,000 00 
5,000 00 
2,000 00 


2,500 00 
5,000 00 
2,000 00 


Repair and oiling 
f Bituminous macadam . 
j Plutonic pavement 
( Repair and oiling . 
Waterbound macadam 


50,688 
600 
600 

20,800 
2,000 


Nantucket County. 










Nantucket 


3,500 00 


3,500 00 


- 


Bituminous concrete 


2,332 


Norfolk County. 












Bellingham 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel .... 


2,000 


Bellingham 


2,000 00 


- 


- 


Repair and oiling 


24,400 


"Canton 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,584 


Franklin . 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


Gravel .... 


5,000 


Holbrook 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,510 


Medfield . 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,420 


Medway . 


3,000 00 


4,000 00 


3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


7,420 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 





Counties and 


Contributions. 


Type of Road. 


Length 
Con- 


Towns. 


State. 


Town. 


County. 


tracted for 

(Feet). 


Norfolk County — 
Con. 
MKllis 


$3,000 00 


$3,000 00 


$3,000 00 


Gravel .... 


4,270 


Millis 




1,300 00 


1,400 00 


1,300 00 


Repair and oiling . . 


13,200 


Norfolk . 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


Gravel . 


1,111 


Sharon 




4,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


3,378 


Stoughton 




6,000 00 


6,000 00 


6,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,300 


Walpole . 




4,000 00 


8,358 35 


4,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


5,740 


Walpole . 




1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


Wood-block paving . 


80 


Wrentham 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Gravel . 


4,050 


Plymouth County. 










Bridgewater 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


4,800 


Carver 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


3,300 


Duxbury 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


Repair and oiling 


1,300 


East Bridgewater . 


3,000 00 


4,000 00 


2,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


2,070 


East Bridgewater . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Two bridges 


- 


Hanover . 


5,000 00 


15,350 00 


5,000 00 


Repair and oiling 


27,212 


Hanson . 




2,000 00 


2,000 00 


- 


Waterbound macadam 


2,300 


Marsh field 




7,000 00 


3,000 00 


5,000 00 


Gravel .... 


18,750 


Norwell . 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Waterbound macadam 


4,300 


Pembroke 




8,000 00 


13,000 00 


8,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


8,908 


Plympton 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous concrete 


2,750 


West Bridgewater . 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Bituminous concrete 


1,657 


Worcester County. 








Barre 


2,000 00 


3,000 00 


- 


Gravel .... 


3,000 


Berlin 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 


- 


Repair and oiling 


36,960 


Boylston 




2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Repair and oiling 


38,016 


Dana 




700 00 


700 00 


700 00 


Gravel .... 


2,125 


Gardner . 




2,500 00 


2,500 00 


- 


Bituminous macadam 


1,050 


Hardwick 




20,000 00 


60,000 00 


20,000 00 


Cement concrete 


16,060 


Harvard . 




9,000 00 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


4,300 


Leicester . 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,100 


Mendon . 




500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


700 


Millbury . 




24,000 00 


41,000 00 


20,000 00 


Cement concrete 


8,249 


Petersham 




500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


Gravel .... 


1,200 


Shrewsbury 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


Bituminous macadam 


2,600 


Sterling . 




2,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


Gravel .... 


1,700 


Westminster 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Gravel .... 


1,700 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



75 



The expenditures during the year in various counties were: 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Bristol 
Dukes 
Essex 
Franklin 
Hampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Nantucket 
Norfolk 
Plymouth . 
Worcester . 



$50,426 13 
69,095 27 
28,343 08 
7,717 00 
89,870 24 
23,669 42 
67,264 72 
26,672 23 

139,024 51 

3,500 00 

57,110 98 

117,125 74 
85,484 44 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow : — 



Barnstable County 



Bourne . 

Brewster 

Dennis . 

Falmouth 

Mashpee 

Sandwich 



$31,683 78 
2,969 82 
2,409 82 
9,443 22 
3,898 79 
20 70 



Berkshire County. 

Alford 400 00 

Becket 300 00 

Cheshire 928 00 

Egremont 1,000 00 

Hancock 2,000 00 

Lanesborough 14,151 67 

New Ashford 29,786 84 

New Marlborough 2,000 00 

Otis 500 00 

Richmond 1,500 00 

Savoy 500 00 

Sheffield 1,956 13 

Tyringham 1,000 00 

Washington 1,000 00 

Williamstown 12,072 63 



76 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Bristol County. 

Berkley $1,520 96 

Dartmouth 2,000 00 

Dighton 8,000 00 

Easton 3,000 00 

Mansfield 7,031 79 

Rehoboth 3,256 23 

Somerset 39 68 

Swansea 1,994 42 

Westport 1,500 00 

Dukes County. 
Tisbury 7,717 00 

Essex County. 

Andover 

Danvers 

Essex 

Groveland 

Ipswich 

Lynnfield 

Marblehead . 

Newbury 

Rowley 

Salisbury 

Saugus 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

West Newbury 



Franklin County. 

Ashfield 

Bernardston 

Buckland 

Colrain 

Montague 

New Salem 

Orange 

Rowe 

Shelburne 

Warwick 



Hampden County. 

Blandford 

Chester 

East Longmeadow 



17,619 54 


11,050 50 


1,000 00 


668 13 


5,727 44 


6,672 67 


10,014 40 


3,173 77 


2,981 86 


21,111 48 


153 00 


5,000 00 


3,197 45 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


951 79 


1,469 30 


800 00 


10,000 00 


5,973 75 


1,000 00 


1,794 88 


279 70 


400 00 


1,000 00 


999 76 


5,102 12 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 77 

Ludlow $200 00 

Southwick 494 45 

Tolland 300 00 

West Springfield 10,000 00 

Westfield 47,368 39 

Wilbraham 1,800 00 

Hampshire County. 

Cummington 79 45 

Easthampton 3,493 20 

Hadley 17,199 58 

Hatfield 5,000 00 

Prescott 400 00 

Southampton 500 00 

Middlesex County. 

Acton 9,685 98 

Ashby 2,000 00 

Ashland 10,095 15 

Ayer 1,702 29 

Bedford 5,877 60 

Billerica 33,736 31 

Boxborough 500 00 

Burlington 800 00 

Carlisle 500 00 

Chelmsford 11,999 40 

Dracut 3,147 92 

Dunstable 1,750 00 

Framingham 8,246 68 

Holliston 1,350 66 

Hopkinton 3,000 00 

Hudson 5,488 73 

Lexington 2,856 77 

Lincoln 5,645 24 

Littleton 2,389 23 

Maynard 2,958 25 

Natick 1,833 33 

North Reading 900 00 

Sherborn 1,500 00 

Stoneham 1,700 00 

Stow 6,767 30 

Sudbury 2,224 93 

Tyngsborough 500 00 

Wakefield 1,902 07 

Wayland 3,300 00 

Westford 2,666 67 

Wilmington 2,000 00 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Nantucket 



Bellingham 
Canton . 
Franklin 
Holbrook 
Medfield 
Medway . 
Millis . 
Norfolk . 
Randolph 
Sharon . 
Walpole . 
Westwood 
Weymouth 
Wrentham 



Bridgewater . 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewater 

Halifax . 

Hanover 

Hanson . 

Kingston 

Lakeville 

Marshfield . 

Norwell . 

Pembroke 

Plympton 

Wareham 

West Bridgewater 



Ashburnham 
Berlin 
Dudley . 
Gardner . 
Harvard 
Holden . 
Leicester 
Millbury 
North Brookfield 



Nantucket County. 
Norfolk County. 



$3,500 00 



Plymouth County. 



Worcester County 



2,997 18 


17,811 49 


4,000 00 


6,230 62 


1,500 00 


3,497 42 


5,072 18 


2,593 07 


2,762 35 


5,069 62 


4,000 00 


450 30 


1,028 00 


98 75 


5,000 00 


10,225 00 


3,463 50 


3,600 00 


3,500 00 


2,457 10 


32,330 34 


1,417 98 


7,000 00 


4,282 00 


4,748 10 


3,552 42 


30,290 23 


5,259 07 


1,027 18 


1,496 79 


18,227 20 


2,500 00 


741 35 


519 24 


6,890 00 


18,883 32 


2,268 29 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



79 



Oxford . 

Petersham 

Princeton 

Shrewsbury 

Sterling . 

Templeton 

Westborough 



$3,100 00 
2,177 73 

13,615 23 
1,996 19 
2,023 88 
2,804 20 
7,213 84 



Total $765,303 76 



80 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



HIGHWAYS IN THE FIVE WESTERN COUNTIES. 

(Chapter 221, General Acts of 1915.) 

Chapter 572, Acts of 1920, in addition to authorizing the 
Division to expend an additional sum of $1,000,000 before 
Nov. 30, 1924, for the purpose of completing the construction 
of certain highways in the five western counties of the State, 
under the provisions of chapter 221 of the General Acts of 
1915, provides that one-fourth of any money which may be 
expended under the provisions of section 1 thereof for a high- 
way in any county shall be repaid by the county to the Com- 
monwealth in such instalments and at such times, within six 
years thereafter, as the Division, with the approval of the 
Auditor of the Commonwealth, shall determine; also that a 
sum equal to the money so repaid shall before Nov. 30, 1926 r 
be expended by the Division without specific appropriation, 
either in completing the highways mentioned in said chapter 
221, or in improving a highway in any town in the five western 
counties that is not situated upon one of the highways men- 
tioned in said act, provided that the valuation of the town 
does not exceed $1,000,000, the highway so improved to be a 
main highway connecting such town with its railroad station, 
with a main through highway, or with an adjoining city or 
town. 

The total expenditures during the year for the con- 
struction of highways in Cummington, Dalton, Windsor and 
Goshen; Otis and Sandisfield; Washington and Hinsdale; 
Worthington, Cummington and Huntington; Peru; Cum- 
mington and Plainfield; Belchertown; Southwick; Ashfield 
and Deerfield; Gill and Bernardston; Barre and Oakham; 
Warwick and Chesterfield were $381,090.53, details of which 
follow : — • 

Route No. 2. 

Cummington $223 96 

Dalton 3,705 23 

Windsor 58,048 46 

Goshen 2,644 39 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 81 



Route No. 3. 

Otis $180 38 

Sandisfield 42 50 

Route No. 4- 

Washington 80,073 32 

Hinsdale 248 64 

Route No. 5. 

Worthington 24,170 97 

Cummington 114 80 

Huntington 75,581 77 

Route No. 6. 
Peru 10,453 19 

Route No. 7. 

Cummington 275 29 

Plainfield 404 50 

Route No. 8. 
Belchertown 11,746 41 

Route No. 9. 
Southwick 13,945 61 

Route No. 10. 

Ashfield 928 86 

Deerfield 48 00 

Route No. 11. 

Gill 13,235 90 

Bernardston 46 48 

Route No. 12. 

Barre 61,775 78 

Oakham 6,109 69 

Route No. 14. 
Warwick 4,989 12 

Route No. 17. 
Chesterfield 12,097 28 

Total $381,090 53 



82 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR OF WAYS NOT STATE HIGH- 
WAYS IN CERTAIN TOWNS. 

Section 23 of chapter 81 of the General Laws provides that — 

The division shall allot for towns having a valuation not exceeding one 
million dollars, in such amounts as it determines, five per cent of the 
amount appropriated each year for the construction of state highways, 
and shall expend the same in constructing and repairing ways therein, 
whether or not such towns shall have made any appropriation or contribu- 
tion in excess of the usual annual appropriations for highway purposes. 
The division may also allot for and expend in such towns for like purposes, 
in addition to any expenditure hereinbefore provided for, a further amount 
of five per cent of said amount appropriated, if such towns appropriate 
or contribute an amount to be expended under this section equal to that 
allotted by the division. The division may likewise allot and expend, 
in towns the valuation of which exceeds one million dollars, not more 
than five per cent of the amount appropriated each year for the construc- 
tion of state highways, if such towns appropriate or contribute, to be 
expended under this section, in addition to the average annual appropri- 
ations for repairs of highways in such towns for the preceding five years, 
exclusive of appropriations or contributions under this section, an amount 
equal to the amount allotted by the division. No town the valuation of 
which is less than one million dollars, and which makes no appropriation 
or contribution under this section, shall receive in any one year more than 
forty per cent of its average annual appropriations for highway purposes 
for the preceding five years; provided, that the division may allot in 
any year a sum not exceeding four hundred dollars to any such town the 
average annual appropriation of which for highway purposes for the pre- 
ceding five years does not exceed one thousand dollars. Such allotments 
and expenditures shall be made only upon petition of the selectmen, 
and section nine shall apply thereto, but a way constructed or repaired 
under this section shall not thereby become a state highway. 

The total expenditures during the year in various towns in 
Barnstable, Berkshire, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, 
Nantucket and Worcester counties, under section 23 of chap- 
ter 81 of the General Laws, under contracts made previous to 
1921, were $74,533.24. Details of the foregoing expenditures 
follow: — 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 83 



Barnstable County. 

Falmouth $500 00 

Berkshire County. 

Hinsdale 896 24 

Mount Washington 200 00 

New Marlborough 430 00 

Tyringham 100 00 

Williamstown 12,946 81 

Essex County. 

Rockport 3,000 00 

Franklin County. 

Colrain 1,599 98 

Warwick 400 00 

Wendell 199 93 

Hampden County. 

Agawam 9,433 94 

Blandford 1,250 00 

Chester 989 96 

Ludlow 750 00 

Monson 2,500 00 

Palmer 28,308 99 

Southwick 498 75 

Wilbraham 4,517 00 

Hampshire County. 

Enfield 600 00 

Granby 999 96 

Middlefield 161 68 

Nantucket County. 

Nantucket 1,750 00 

Worcester County. 

Gardner 2,500 00 

Total $74,533 24 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENT OF PUBLIC WAYS. 

(Chapter 155, General Acts of 1918.) 

The expenditures during 1921 in various counties, for the 
maintenance and improvement of public ways, exclusive of 
State highways in certain towns, under chapter 155, General 
Acts of 1918, were: — 



Counties. 



Amount. 



Berkshire . 
Bristol 
Franklin 
Hampden . 
Hampshire 
Middlesex . 
Worcester . 



$2,966 15 
4,678 41 
1,316 89 
2,421 35 
5,255 24 
525 00 
3,155 23 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 



Berkshire County. 



Alford 

Becket 

Hinsdale . 

Monterey 

New Marlborough 

Sandisfield 

Savoy 

Washington 



Raynham 
Rehoboth 



Conway . 
Gill . . 
Heath 
Leverett . 
Leyden 
New Salem 
Northfield 
Rowe 



Bristol County. 



Franklin County. 



$204 48 


900 00 


50 00 


1,075 00 


350 00 


161 67 


25 00 


200 00 


1,678 41 


3,000 00 


32 40 


24 53 


85 43 


225 00 


24 53 


175 00 


100 00 


25 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



85 



Shutesbury $75 00 

Sunderland 450 00 

Warwick 100 00 

Hampden County. 

Blandford . . 266 78 

Brimfield 400 00 

Chester 479 50 

Hampden 23 06 

Holland 75 00 

Monson 50 00 

Southwick 227 01 

Tolland 900 00 

Hampshire County. 

Belchertown 250 00 

Chesterfield 225 00 

Cummington 800 00 

Enfield 23 73 

Goshen 150 00 

Granby 387 50 

Greenwich 25 00 

Huntington 275 00 

Middlefield 725 00 

Pelham 176 71 

Westhampton 1,600 00 

Williamsburg 221 66 

Worthington 395 64 

Middlesex County. 

Ashby 225 00 

Townsend r 300 00 

Worcester County. 

Ashburnham 200 00 

Charlton 267 10 

Hubbardston 75 00 

New Braintree 1,225 00 

Oakham 154 44 

Paxton 69 88 

Phillipston • 72 27 

Princeton 516 69 

Royalston 74 98 

Rutland 250 00 

Templeton ' . 49 87 

Westminster 200 00 

Total $20,318 27 



£6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



REPAIR AND IMPROVEMENT OF PUBLIC WAYS, EXCLUSIVE 
OF STATE HIGHWAYS, IN CERTAIN TOWNS. 

(Sections 26-29 and 31 of chapter 81 of the General Laws, as amended, with refer- 
ence to section 26, by section 1 of chapter 120 of the Acts of 1921.) 

Section 26. There may be expended for the repair and improvement 
of public ways, other than state highwa3 r s, in towns the valuation of 
which is less than three million dollars and in which the amount of such 
valuation, divided by the number of miles of such public ways, herein- 
after referred to as the road mileage valuation, is less than fifty thousand 
dollars, such sums, not exceeding fifty dollars per mile, as the general 
court may appropriate therefor; provided, that such towns shall con- 
tribute or make available for use in connection therewith the following 
amounts for each mile of said public ways within their respective limits, 
according to the following schedule based on their road mileage valuation. 

1. Less than five thousand dollars, twelve dollars and fifty cents. 

2. Five thousand dollars and less than seven thousand five hundred 
dollars, fifteen dollars. 

3. Seven thousand five hundred dollars and less than ten thousand 
dollars, twenty-five dollars. 

4. Ten thousand dollars and less than fifteen thousand dollars, forty 
dollars. 

5. Fifteen thousand dollars and less than twenty thousand dollars, 
fifty dollars. 

6. Twenty thousand dollars and less than thirty thousand dollars, 
seventy-five dollars. 

7. Thirty thousand dollars and less than forty thousand dollars, one 
hundred dollars. 

8. Forty thousand dollars and less than fifty thousand dollars, one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

The amounts appropriated as aforesaid and contributed by the towns 
shall be expended under the direction of the division on such ways as the 
division and the selectmen of the towns may agree upon. 

Chapter 81 of the General Laws was amended by section 1 
of chapter 120 of the Acts of 1921 by adding a new section, as 
follows: — 

Section 26A. The county commissioners of the county wherein any 
public way is to be repaired or improved under the provisions of the pre- 
ceding section may contribute and expend county funds therefor in 
accordance with such agreements as the commissioners may make with 
the division and the selectmen of the town. Said county funds may be 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 87 

paid to the division or to the town from time to time as the work pro- 
gresses, to the extent that the said commissioners are satisfied that the 
work for which agreements have been made is being done in accordance 
therewith. Such contributions or expenditures by a county shall not 
render it liable for defects in any way or for damages to persons traveling 
thereon, and when the work of repair or maintenance for which such 
contribution or expenditure is made is completed, there shall be no fur- 
ther obligation on the part of the county as to the repair and maintenance 
thereof until a further contribution is made by the county commissioners 
for such purpose. 

Other sections of chapter 81 are: — 

Section 27. The said expenditures shall be made only upon the 
written petition of the selectmen, containing such information as the 
division may require. No work shall be done under the preceding section 
in any district where dwelling houses or structures devoted to business 
are situated at intervals averaging less than two hundred feet for the 
distance of a quarter of a mile. 

Section 28. The said towns may contract with the division for the 
performance of the work authorized by section twenty-six; or, if the 
selectmen so request, the division may have the work done by such per- 
sons and in such manner as it may determine, in which event the towns 
shall pay their proportionate part of the expense when and as ordered by 
the division. The cost of any materials, machinery or tools purchased 
by the division for or on account of the work in any town shall be con- 
sidered as a part of the expenditures in such town under section twenty- 
six; and such machinery or tools shall belong to the commonwealth. 

Section 29. The division shall determine, as nearly as possible, the 
number of miles of such public ways in towns the valuation of which is 
less than three million dollars, and shall inform the selectmen of such 
towns of the contributions required under section twenty-six. 

Section 31. The valuation of a town for the purposes of this chapter 
shall be the last preceding valuation made for the purpose of apportioning 
the state tax. 

During the year the Division has contracted for work to be 
done in the towns named in the following table, which also 
shows the allotments or contributions by the State and towns: — 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Counties and Towns. 




Allotments. 



Town. 



Barnstable County: 
Eastham 
Truro . 
Wellfleet 



Berkshire County: 
Alford . 
Becket . 
Florida . 
Hancock 
Hinsdale 
Lanesborough 
Monterey 
New Marlborough 
Otis 
Peru 

Sandisfield . 
Savoy . 
Sheffield 
Tyringham . 
West Stockbridge 
Windsor 



Bristol County: 
Freetown 
Norton . 
Raynham 
Rehoboth 



Essex County: 

West Newbury 

Franklin County: 
Ashfield 
Bernardston . 
Charlemont . 
Colrain . 
Conway 
Gill 

Hawley 
Heath . 
Leverett 
Leyden 
New Salem . 
Northfield . 
Shutesbury . 
Sunderland . 
Warwick 
Wendell 
Whately 



Hampden County: 
Blandford 
Brimfield 
Chester 
Granville 
Hampden 
Holland 
Monson 
Montgomery 
Southwick 
Tolland 
Wales 



Hampshire County: 
Belchertown 
Chesterfield . 
Cummington 
Enfield . 
Goshen 
Granby 
Greenwich . 
Huntington . 
Middlefield . 
Pelham 
Plainfield 



$1,950 00 
3,000 00 
1,750 00 



,000 00 
,900 00 
,050 00 
,450 00 
,850 00 
,500 00 
,500 00 
,000 00 
,950 00 
,250 00 
,000 00 
,800 00 
,000 00 
,150 00 
,800 00 
,000 00 



3,000 00 
1,200 00 
2,200 00 
3,000 00 



1,950 00 



,000 00 
,550 00 
,500 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,800 00 
,450 00 
,700 00 
,950 00 
,050 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,700 00 
,800 00 
,350 00 
,950 00 



3,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
1 ,700 00 
1 ,600 00 
3,000 00 
1 ,600 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,400 00 



3,000 00 
2,600 00 
2,450 00 
1,850 00 
1 ,550 00 
2,300 00 
1 ,950 00 
2,050 00 
1 ,950 00 
2,000 00 
2,400 00 



$1 ,950 00 
2,200 00 
4,500 00 



800 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 
1 ,500 00 
2,775 00 
3,500 00 
1,250 00 
4,000 00 
1,000 00 

900 00 
3,000 00 
1 ,000 00 
4,500 00 
1,150 00 
2,900 00 

825 00 



5,000 00 
2,400 00 
5,000 00 
4,040 00 



3,000 00 



3,280 00 
2,040 00 
2,000 00 
3,600 00 
2,960 00 
1 ,800 00 
1 ,200 00 
1 ,400 00 
2,000 00 
1 ,000 00 
1,500 00 
5,325 00 
1 ,000 00 
2,550 00 
1,500 00 
2,500 00 
3,000 00 



3,440 00 
3,060 00 
3,550 00 
3,300 00 
1,360 00 

450 00 
6,300 00 

800 00 
7,000 00 
2,050 00 
1,120 00 



6,940 00 
1 ,300 00 
2,000 00 
3,000 00 
800 00 
2,500 00 
1 ,000 00 
3,200 00 
1,500 00 
1,750 00 
1,000 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



89 



Counties and Towns. 




Allotments. 



Town. 



Hampshire County — Concluded. 
Prescott . 

Southampton 
Westhampton 
Williamsburg 
Worthington 



Middlesex County: 
Ashby . 
Boxborough . 
Carlisle 
Dunstable 
Holliston 
Hopkinton . 
Sherborn 
Stow 

Townsend 
Tyngsborough 
Wilmington . 



Norfolk County 
Bellingham 
Medway 



Plymouth County: 
Halifax . 
Lakeville 
Plympton 
Rochester 



"Worcester County: 
Ashburnham 
Berlin . 
Bolton . 
Boylston 
Brookfield 
Charlton 
Dana 
Douglas 
Harvard 
Holden . 
Hubbardston 
Lunenburg . 
Mendon 
New Braintree 
Oakham 
Paxton . 
Petersham 
Phillipston . 
Princeton 
Royalston 
Rutland 
Sterling 
Sturbridge . 
Sutton . 
Templeton . 
Upton . 
Westminster . 



$1,950 00 
3,000 00 
2,450 00 
2,100 00 
3,000 00 



2,850 00 
1,200 00 
3,000 00 
1 ,750 00 
1,300 00 
3,000 00 
2,500 00 
2,250 00 
3,000 00 
1,700 00 
2,450 00 



2,050 00 
2,000 00 



1,600 00 
2,850 00 
1 ,700 00 
3,000 00 



000 00 
,850 00 
,750 00 
,600 00 
,250 00 
,000 00 
,500 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,150 00 
,450 00 
,350 00 
,450 00 
,000 00 
,050 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
000 00 
000 00 



$800 00 
2,500 00 

800 00 
4,200 00 

900 00 



2,850 00 
1 ,050 00 
1,500 00 
1 ,400 00 
3,300 00 
5,175 00 
13,000 00 
3,375 00 
4,700 00 
2,550 00 
6,125 00 



4,100 00 
8,000 00 



2,400 00 
5,000 00 
1 ,700 00 
5,160 00 



4,760 00 
2,775 00 
2,200 00 
1,600 00 
4,000 00 
4,800 00 
1 ,250 00 
3,000 00 
6,360 00 
7,500 00 
3,500 00 
5,550 00 
2,150 00 
2,586 00 
1,425 00 
1,320 00 
4,650 00 
1,800 00 
4,000 00 
4,100 00 
3,540 00 
5,000 00 
3,600 00 
4,500 00 
6,900 00 
4,650 00 
3,440 00 



The expenditures during 1921, in various counties, for the 
repair and improvement of public ways, exclusive of State 
highways, in certain towns, were : — 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



County. 



Amount. 



Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Essex . 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 



$2,274 75 

33,355 50 

7,200 00 

1,500 00 

36,616 46 

22,005 29 

33,669 11 

23,132 48 

4,050 00 

7,660 87 

61,017 08 



Details of the foregoing expenditures follow: — 

Barnstable County. 

Truro $1,434 75 

Wellfleet 840 00 

Berkshire County. 

Alford 1,000 00 

Becket 2,900 00 

Florida 2,050 00 

Hancock 1,310 86 

Hinsdale 1,400 67 

Lanesborough 1,819 81 

Monterey 2,251 14 

New Marlborough 2,769 07 

Otis 2,950 00 

Peru 2,215 56 

Sandisfield 3,000 00 

Savoy 2,759,95 

Sheffield 1,270 87 

Tyringham 1,065 37 

West Stockbridge 1,714 53 

Windsor 2,877 67 

Bristol County. 

Freetown 3,000 00 

Raynham 1,200 00 

Rehoboth 3,000 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 91 



Essex County. 

West Newbury $1,500 00 

Franklin County. 

Ashfield 57 20 

Bernardston 2,500 00 

Charlemont 2,500 00 

Colrain 2,998 50 

Conway 2,478 16 

Gill 1,800 00 

Hawley 2,425 00 

Heath 2,700 00 

Leverett 1,725 00 

Leyden 2,050 00 

New Salem 2,900 00 

Northfield 2,382 60 

Shutesbury 1,900 00 

Sunderland 1,525 00 

Warwick 2,775 00 

Wendell 2,275 00 

Whately 1,625 00 

Hampden County. 

Blandford 2,246 45 

Brimfield 2,700 03 

Chester 2,309 16 

Granville 2,501 48 

Hampden 1,484 99 

Holland 1,430 82 

Monson 3,000 00 

Montgomery 1,599 82 

Southwick 1,756 01 

Tolland 1,652 32 

Wales 1,324 21 

Hampshire County. 

Belchertown 1,711 40 

Chesterfield 2,577 82 

Cummington 2,450 00 

Enfield 1,675 27 

Goshen 1,500 00 

Granby 2,200 00 

Greenwich 1,950 00 

Huntington 1,471 80 

Middlefield . 1,703 38 

Pelham . . . 2,000 00 



92 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Plainfield $2,400 00 

Prescott 1,950 00 

Southampton 2,950 00 

Westhampton 2,425 00 

Williamsburg 1,779 44 

Worthington 2,925 00 

Middlesex County. 

Ashby 2,850 00 

Boxborough 1,216 60 

Carlisle 2,983 56 

Dunstable 1,156 00 

Holliston 965 00 

Hopkinton ..." 2,847 34 

Sherborn 2,383 94 

Stow 2,065 76 

Townsend 2,557 00 

Tyngsborough 1,700 00 

Wilmington 2,407 28 

Norfolk County. 

Bellingham 2,050 00 

Medway 2,000 00 

Plymouth County. 

Halifax . . * . . . . 1,600 00 

Lakeville 1,815 00 

Plympton 1,672 67 

Rochester 2,573 20 

Worcester County. 

Ashburnham 2,665 11 

Berlin 1,121 99 

Bolton 1,976 52 

Boylston 878 77 

Brookfield 1,567 18 

Charlton 2,999 36 

Dana 2,061 69 

Douglas 3,000 00 

Harvard 3,000 00 

Holden 2,435 70 

Hubbardston 2,504 73 

Lunenburg 2,218 86 

Mendon 2,073 29 

New Braintree . . . 2,182 20 

Oakham 2,047 74 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 93 

Paxton $1,177 53 

Petersham 2,520 06 

Phillipston 1,715 18 

Princeton 2,225 41 

Royalston 2,484 26 

Rutland 3,000 00 

Sterling 2,566 25 

Sturbridge 2,755 32 

Sutton 2,099 62 

Templeton 2,649 50 

Upton 2,448 84 

Westminster 2,641 97 



Total $232,481 54 

Engineering charges 1 129,042 41 



Total $361,523 95 



94 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



STATE AID IN KEEPING CERTAIN HIGHWAYS OPEN DUR- 
ING THE WINTER MONTHS. 

Chapter 84 of the General Laws, section 11, provides: — 

The department of public works may, by furnishing such equipment 
as it deems desirable and supervising the use of the same, co-operate 
with the proper officers of cities and towns in keeping open and reason- 
ably passable for vehicles during the winter months such highways as 
may be selected by said department, with the approval of the proper 
officers of the city or town in which any such highway is located, having 
regard to the importance thereof for commercial uses and the co-operation 
and aid to be rendered by cities, towns and persons in carrying on this 
work, and for this purpose may accept financial or other assistance from 
any person; provided, however, that work carried on under this section 
shall be supplemental to work undertaken and performed by cities and 
towns under other provisions of law, and that nothing in this section shall 
render the commonwealth liable for damages for which it is not liable 
under other provisions of law or relieve cities and towns from keeping their 
highways clear from ice and snow as required by other provisions of law. 

Lp to Dec. 1, 1921, snow fences were erected during the 
winter months along the Boston-Springfield, Boston-Lawrence, 
Springfield-Greenfield, Greenfield-Pittsfield, Pittsfield-North 
Adams, and Pittsfield-Springfield lines of highway, the total 
length of fences being approximately 12,600 feet. The De- 
partment also furnished certain equipment in accordance with 
the provisions of section 11 aforesaid. 

The expenditure during the year ending Nov. 30, 1921, was 
$47,333.83. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 95 



THE REGULATION OF ADVERTISING SIGNS AND DEVICES 
WITHIN THE PUBLIC VIEW. 

By the provisions of chapter 545 of the Acts of 1920, ap- 
proved May 27, 1920, the Division of Highways of the De- 
partment of Public Works was directed, within sixty days 
after the passage of the act, to make rules and regulations for 
the proper control and restriction of billboard and other ad- 
vertising devices on public ways or on private property within 
public view of any highway, public park or reservation, and 
authorized, from time to time, to amend, repeal or add to said 
rules and regulations. 

Rules and regulations were adopted by the Division, to be 
in force on and after Dec. 31, 1920, and they were printed in 
the annual report of the Department of Public Works for the 
year ending Nov. 30, 1920. 

Chapter 545 aforesaid is now consolidated in the General 
Laws, chapter 93, sections 29 to 33, inclusive, as follows: — 

Section 29. The division of highways of the department of public 
works, hereinafter called the division, shall make and may amend or 
repeal rules and regulations for the proper control and restriction of bill- 
boards, signs and other advertising devices, except as provided in section 
thirty-two, on public ways or on private property within public view of 
any highway, public park or reservation. Said rules and regulations 
may require that said billboards, signs or other devices be licensed in 
accordance therewith and with this section, may prescribe license fees, 
to be fixed with regard to the cost of administering this section, and need 
not be uniform throughout the commonwealth. Before establishing or 
amending rules or regulations under this section, the division shall hold 
duly advertised public hearings in Boston and elsewhere within the 
commonwealth as it deems necessary or expedient. Subject to the ap- 
proval of the division, towns may further regulate and restrict said bill- 
boards or other devices within their respective limits by ordinance or 
by-law not inconsistent with sections twenty-nine to thirty-three, inclu- 
sive, or with said rules and regulations. 

Section 30. No person, firm, association or corporation shall post, 
erect, display or maintain on any public way or on private property 
within public view from any highway, public park or reservation any 
billboard or other advertising device, whether erected before August 
twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred and twenty, or not, which advertises or 



96 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

calls attention to any business, article, substance or any other thing, un- 
less such billboard or device conforms to the rules and regulations and 
ordinances or by-laws established under the preceding section; provided, 
that this section shall not apply to signs or other devices existing on said 
date and erected and maintained in conformity with then existing law 
and which advertise or indicate either the person occupying the premises 
in question or the business transacted thereon, or advertise the property 
itself or any part thereof .as for sale or to let. 

Section 31. The supreme judicial and superior courts shall have 
jurisdiction in equity upon petition of the attorney general, of any town 
or any officer thereof, or of any interested party, to restrain the erection 
or maintenance of any billboard, sign or other device erected or main- 
tained in violation of any rule, regulation, ordinance or by-law established 
or adopted under section twenty-nine, and to order the removal or abate- 
ment of such billboard, sign or device as a nuisance. 

Section 32. Sections twenty-nine to thirty-one, inclusive, and thirty- 
three shall not apply to signs or other devices on or in the rolling stock, 
stations, subways or structures of or used by common carriers. 

Section 33. Whoever violates any rule, regulation, ordinance or 
by-law established or adopted under section twenty-nine shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars, and whoever after con- 
viction of such violation unlawfully maintains such a billboard, sign or 
other device for twenty days thereafter shall be punished by a fine of 
not more than five hundred dollars. 

Work was inaugurated in the spring of 1921, with one in- 
spector and one assistant inspector, who were charged with the 
duty of examining locations described in applications made to 
the Division for licenses or permits under the provisions of the 
General Laws aforesaid. On June 29, 1921, the Division held 
a public hearing for the purpose of obtaining the views of 
various parties and formulating a revision of the rules and 
regulations in effect on and after Dec. 31, 1920. 

Revised rules and regulations were adopted June 29, 1921, 
to be in force on and after July 1, 1921, as follows: — 

Section 1. Definitions. 

Terms used in the following rules and regulations shall be construed 
as follows: — 

"Division" shall mean Division of Highways, Department of Public 
Works. 

"Licenses" shall mean the right to carry on the business of outdoor 
advertising by means of billboards, sigrs, and other advertising devices. 

"Permit" shall mean the right to locate and maintain a particular sign. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 97 

"Person" shall mean any individual, firm, association, partnership, or 
corporation, who erects or causes to be erected outdoor advertising signs, 
or is engaged in carrying on the business of outdoor advertising. 

"Sign" shall mean any form of outdoor advertising for which a permit 
may be petitioned, or for which a permit may be granted under the pro- 
visions of these regulations. 

"Outdoor advertising" shall mean advertising, the control of which, 
under the provisions of section 29 of chapter 93 of the General Laws, is 
vested in the Division of Highways, Department of Public Works. 

Section 2. Licenses. 

A. No person shall engage in the business of advertising in this Com- 
monwealth by means of outdoor advertising signs without first having 
obtained a license from the Division of Highways, Department of Public 
Works. 

B. Applications for licenses may be made to the Division upon blanks 
prepared under its authority. 

C. Applications shall contain such information as the Division may 
require, and must be accompanied by the proper fee. 

D. The fee shall be $50, and the license shall be in force for one year 
unless earlier suspended or revoked. 

E. Applications for renewal of licenses may be made not later than 
thirty days prior to the date of expiration, and must be accompanied by 
the annual fee of $50. 

F. The Division reserves the right to suspend or revoke for cause any 
license issued by it under the provisions of this section. 

Section 3. Permits to Persons Engaged in Carrying on the Busi- 
ness of Outdoor Advertising. 

A. No person, firm, association, partnership or corporation engaged 
in carrying on the business of outdoor advertising shall post, erect, dis- 
play or maintain within public view from any highway, public park or 
reservation any billboard, sign or other advertising device, except as 
hereinafter provided. 

B. No sign shall be located until an application for a permit has been 
filed with the Division and the permit granted. 

C. Applications shall be on forms prepared under the direction of, 
and furnished by, the Division, and shall contain such information as the 
Division may require. 

D. Upon receipt of an application for the location of a sign in any city 
or town, notice shall be forwarded to the officials in charge of licenses in 
the city or town where said sign is to be located, setting forth that such 
application has been received, and that unless disapproved on the part 
of said officials within twenty days of date of application, action will 
forthwith be taken upon the same by the Division. If objection to the 
location of such sign as set forth in said application is registered by officials 



98 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

of the city or town, a hearing shall be given by the Division of Highways 
or its representative before action is taken upon said application by the 
Division. 

E. Each sign shall carry the serial number of the permit authorizing 
its location, in figures of a size approved by the Division. 

F. Each application for the annual permit shall be accompanied by a 
fee of $1, to be known as the examination fee; and upon issuance of a 
permit an additional fee of $1, to be designated as an inspection fee, shall 
be paid by the licensee. 

G. Permits shall be valid and in force, unless they are revoked by 
the Division, upon payment of the annual fees, which shall be due on the 
first day of July of each year. Failure to pay such fees within thirty days 
of the first day of July will be deemed sufficient reason for forthwith 
cancelling such permits. 

H. The Division reserves the right to annul and revoke for cause any 
permit issued by it under the provisions of this section. 

Section 4. Permits to Persons Not Engaged in Carrying on the 
Business of Outdoor Advertising. 

A. No person, not engaged in carrying on the business of outdoor 
advertising, shall post, erect, display or maintain within public view 
from any highway, public park or reservation any billboard, sign or ad- 
vertising device, except as hereinafter provided. 

B. No sign shall be located until an application for a permit has 
been filed with the Division and the permit granted. 

C. Application for a permit shall be on forms prepared under the 
direction of and furnished by the Division, and shall contain such infor- 
mation as the Division may require. 

D. Permits granted under this section will allow the posting, erecting, 
displaying or maintaining of advertising devices for one year, or for such 
period less than one year as the Division in its discretion may authorize. 
A minimum fee of SI will be charged for permits issued under this section, 
with an additional charge to be determined by the length of time that 
the advertising is to be displayed and the number of signs to be used. 

E. All signs displayed under the provisions of this section shall be 
removed by the persons to whom the permit is issued not later than two 
weeks after the expiration of the permit. 

F. The Division reserves the right to cancel or revoke for cause any 
permit issued by it under the provisions of this section. 

Section 5. Locations. 

A. No outdoor advertising shall be permitted within the bounds 
of any highway. 

B. No permits shall be issued for outdoor advertising on any location 
within 300 feet of any park, parkway, playground, or reservation, except 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 99 

under the following conditions: Permits may be issued for the mainte- 
nance of billboards now located, for such length of time as the Division 
may specifically determine; permits may be issued for the location of 
electrical display signs on buildings, under such restrictions as the Divi- 
sion may require. 

C. No outdoor advertising shall be permitted upon any rock or tree, 
nor upon any fence or pole bordering on any public highway. 

D. The location of all signs shall be clearly stated in permits as 
issued. 

Section 6. Character and Maintenance. 

A. Signs shall be of such size, shape and material as the Division 
shall approve, and shall be so erected and maintained as to conform to 
the provisions of the laws of the Commonwealth relating to fire hazard. 

B. It shall be the duty of the licensee maintaining a sign under a 
permit from the Division to keep it and the ground about the same, 
free from all rubbish, or any material which the Division may consider 
disadvantageous to the community. 

C. The Division reserves the right to pass on all matter displayed on 
any sign maintained under a permit from the Division, and may require 
the licensee to remove any objectionable matter. 

D. If the licensee fails to meet the requirements of this section, such 
failure shall be deemed sufficient cause for the revocation of the permit 
under which said sign was erected and maintained. 

Section 7. Restrictions. 
No permits shall be granted for the location or maintenance of signs 
near certain highways in territory which, in the opinion of the Division, 
is of unusual scenic beauty. Such places will be designated by the Division 
from time to time. 

Section 8. Removals. 
All signs now located within the Commonwealth, and in any way 
affected by these rules and regulations, must be removed on or before 
July 1, 1921, unless permits for the location or maintenance thereof shall 
have previously been granted; provided, however, that signs for the 
maintenance of which applications shall have been made but not acted 
upon by the Division on that date may be permitted to remain until 
such time as action thereon is taken by the Division, and in case of the 
Division's refusal to issue a permit, for a further period of ninety days from 
the date on which notice of such refusal has been mailed to the applicant. 

Section 9. 

These rules and regulations are in substitution of all previous rules and 
regulations adopted, and shall take effect July 1, 1921. 



100 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

During the year individuals and firms to the number of 47 
have made applications for licenses to carry on the busi- 
ness of outdoor advertising within the State. To Dec. 1, 
1921, applications to the number of 9,565 were filed for the 
maintenance of outdoor advertising signs. Examinations of 
the locations of approximately 5,500 of these applications have 
been made, the majority being west of a line drawn across the 
State from Fitchburg through Worcester to the Rhode Island 
line. Permits to the number of 846 have been granted for the 
maintenance of advertising signs; also 10 permits for the 
placing of small cardboard signs outside highway locations, 
in connection with agricultural fairs, and which were to be 
removed upon the expiration of the permits. 

Applications for permits to the number of 54 have been dis- 
approved, 51 of which were to be maintained at or near the 
certain roads which the Division designated scenic highways. 
The highways so designated include the following: — 

Mohawk Trail route, beginning at a point on the 1919 sec- 
tion of the State highway in Greenfield, at its intersection with 
the old road to Shelburne, and shown as station 31 on a map 
on file in the office of the Division, and extending in a westerly 
direction along the State highway in Greenfield, Shelburne, 
Buckland, Charlemont, Florida, Savoy and North Adams to 
the Five Corners, so called, in North Adams. 

North Shore route, beginning at the junction of Stone and 
Cabot streets, in Beverly, and following along Stone Street to 
Lothrop, to Hale, to West Street; thence through Beverly 
Farms to the Manchester line; bridge, Washington and Sum- 
mer streets, Manchester, to the Gloucester line; Western 
Avenue, in Gloucester, to the Annisquam River bridge, omit- 
ting the city of Gloucester. Beginning again at a point op- 
posite the Lufkin School on Eastern Avenue, in Gloucester, 
and extending to the Rockport line; thence through Main 
Street, Railroad Avenue and Granite Street, in Rockport, to 
the Gloucester line; thence through Langsford and Wash- 
ington streets to the junction of Grove and Washington streets, 
in Gloucester. 

Northampton-Pittsfield route, beginning at the junction of 
the Ashfield-Goshen road, near the Hotel Williams in Williams- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 101 

burg, and extending through Williamsburg, Goshen, Cumming- 
ton, Windsor and Dalton to the junction of Main and Maple 
streets, in Dalton. 

The total amount received during the year in payment for 
licenses and permits was $12,597.21. 

The expenditure during the year ending Nov. 30, 1921, was 
$6,175.72. 



102 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR LEGIS- 
LATION RELATING TO THE DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS, 
INCLUDING THE REGISTRY OF MOTOR VEHICLES. 

State Oversight of Bridges. 

1. Such study of the bridge situation in the Commonwealth 
as has been possible in conjunction with the necessary work of 
the Department leads to a recommendation for legislation to 
provide for more definite control of the construction of new 
public highway bridges, and the rebuilding of existing bridges 
upon highways for which the State is responsible in whole or 
in part. 

Restriction of Loads on Public Highways and Bridges. 

2. Many States have given authority to State highway de- 
partments to restrict or entirely prohibit operation of heavy 
vehicles on improved highways under such conditions as said 
departments may prescribe. The Division of Highways of 
the Department of Public Works believes that such action 
is not wise in Massachusetts, but it is considered important 
that a better oversight should be established over heavy 
loads that desire to use the highways, both from the stand- 
point of protecting the highway and controlling the operation 
of the vehicle. 

Authority to open up Dangerous Corners. 

3. While the recommendation of the Department made a 
year ago was not approved by the Legislature, the situation is 
believed to be of such importance as to justify a similar recom- 
mendation at the present time. In the belief that a change 
may be made in the existing law that will afford the necessary 
relief, it is recommended that section 14 of chapter 81 of the 
General Laws be amended. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 103 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

Motor Vehicle Fees. 

4, 5 and 6. A continued study of the problem of meeting 
the increasing demands for improved highways still further 
strengthens the belief of the commissioners that increased 
motor vehicle fees must be secured. The burdens being placed 
upon highways, bridges and all activities associated with the 
demand for safer and better highway travel are so directly 
related to the rapidly developing use of motor vehicles that the 
Department believes that it is only just that the direct cause 
of the larger part of this demand should bear the added burden. 

The Department has given full consideration to the con- 
tention frequently made that a larger portion of this ex- 
pense should be carried in direct taxation, but legislation en- 
acted along the lines proposed by the Department would still 
leave as a charge upon direct taxation a cost of highways in 
the Commonwealth nearly four times that which motor vehicle 
owners would pay. When it is further taken into account that 
this direct taxation burden also shows an increased cost met 
in this way of approximately four times what it was twenty 
years ago, it will be seen that the general public is already 
bearing a large burden incident to the newly developed system 
of transportation. 

Consideration has been given by the Department to new 
methods of taxation that shall meet the demand for larger 
highway expenditures, but the present method of a direct 
and definite tax, fixing the charge which the motorists must 
pay for a year's license fee, with a force already organized for 
its collection and having the almost universal approval of the 
men directing the automobile industry in the State, appeals to 
the Department as the proper method to continue to follow in 
handling this situation. 

To better afford an opportunity for discussion of the issues 
involved in registration fees for passenger vehicles as distinct 
from registration fees for motor trucks, legislation is recom- 
mended for each type of vehicle. The Department is con- 
vinced that while the most serious problem involved in the 
operation of the passenger car is related to the service which 



104 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

the highway furnishes to that particular vehicle, in connection 
with the commercial vehicle the problem is more directly re- 
lated to the damage occasioned by the heavy vehicle and the 
necessity for heavy construction to care for its needs. 

These recommendations are based upon an exhaustive study 
of fees established in other States, with such added investiga- 
tion from an engineering standpoint as to justify the recom- 
mendations made. These rates would establish the fees for 
motor vehicle registration in Massachusetts on a basis less than 
several other New England States, and but a trifle more than 
the average in all New England States. When it is recog- 
nized that motorists in Massachusetts have available for their 
use a larger proportionate mileage of improved highway than 
any other State in the Union, it is believed that the proposed 
fees are fairly established. 

Rulings by Registrar of Motor Vehicles. 

7. To more definitely define the procedure in enforcing cer- 
tain rulings that the registrar of motor vehicles is authorized 
by law to make, a change is recommended in chapter 90, sec- 
tion 28 of the General Laws relative to appeals from the decision 
of the registrar of motor vehicles. 

Additional Equipment of Motor Vehicles. 

8. The developed use of the enclosed car and the equipment 
of practically all cars with curtains and enclosed tops for the 
winter season emphasize the importance of having motor 
vehicles equipped with some device that shall show from the 
rear the purpose of the operator more definitely than it is now 
possible by any hand signal. It is recommended that such 
equipment shall be required. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 105 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR LEGIS- 
LATION RELATING TO THE DIVISION OF WATERWAYS 
AND PUBLIC LANDS. 

Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor. 

9. In order to conform to certain requirements fixed by the 
Federal government, a slight change is necessary in the har- 
bor line established in Boston Harbor in East Boston. 

Harbor Lines in Weymouth Fore River. 

10. The industrial development under way in Weymouth 
Fore River requires a further extension of an established har- 
bor line above Quincy Point bridge. 

Improvements in Westfield River. 

11. The Division of Waterways and Public Lands of the 
Department of Public Works already has a limited control 
over the placing of structures and carrying on of improve- 
ments in a portion of the Connecticut River. Emptying into 
this section of the Connecticut River is the Westfield, or 
Agawam, River, and in connection with the area extending 
from the mouth of the river a considerable distance up, there 
is more or less development requiring such control as will 
properly protect private parties who are involved and the 
public interest concerned. To secure such protection, it is 
recommended that legislation be passed to provide for the care 
and supervision of that part of Westfield River. 

Public Terminal on the Cape Cod Canal. 

12. Attention has been given by the Division of Waterways 
and Public Lands to the question of establishing on the Cape 
Cod Canal a public terminal. Further consideration may be 
given to this project, and action may be taken, if the same is 
deemed wise, through a proper co-operation between the local 
interests and the Commonwealth. 



106 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Investigation of Conditions affecting Pilots. 

13. Various occurrences and conditions that have arisen in 
some of the harbors outside of Boston indicate that the pilot- 
age service at those ports is in a somewhat unorganized con- 
dition. The customs, regulations and statutes affecting that 
service are based largely on conditions of many years ago, and 
are designed to meet small ships and natural channels. At 
the present time the Commonwealth is spending considerable 
sums for dredging and improving harbors, to encourage com- 
merce. The proper use of these improvements is hindered to a 
considerable extent by the difficulties the modern steamship of 
large size experiences under our present pilotage laws. It is 
recommended that the Division of Waterways and Public 
Lands be directed to investigate this subject and report its 
findings, with such recommendations as may seem advisable. 

In General. 

14. To properly protect such employees of the Department 
of Public Works not now cared for under the workmen's com- 
pensation act, it is recommended that legislation be passed to 
provide for the payment of compensation to certain employees 
of the Department of Public Works who receive injuries. 

15. LTnder the present method of construction employed in 
many different forms of public work, certain materials are 
used as directly in the work as if they were allowed to stay 
there upon the completion of the contract. Notwithstanding 
this situation, it is impossible under existing law to properly 
protect men who supply to contractors for the Commonwealth 
this type of material. To secure such dealers in their trans- 
actions with contractors upon the public works of the State, 
the Department recommends an amendment to existing law 
that will provide "for protection of claims for labor and ma- 
terials furnished for public works." 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 107 



APPENDIX. 



Federal Highway Act. 

An Act to amend the Act entitled " An Act to provide that the 
United States shall aid the States in the construction of 
rural post roads, and for other purposes," approved july 11, 
1916, as amended and supplemented, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as 
the Federal Highway Act. 

Sec. 2. That, when used in this Act, unless the context indicates 
otherwise — 

The term ''Federal Aid Act" means the Act entitled "An Act to 
provide that the United States shall aid the States in the construction 
of rural post roads, and for other purposes," approved July 11, 1916, as 
amended by sections 5 and 6 of an Act entitled "An Act making ap- 
propriations for the service of the Post Office Department for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1920, and for other purposes," approved February 
28, 1919, and all other Acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto. 

The term "highway" includes rights of way, bridges, drainage struc- 
tures, signs, guard rails, and protective structures in connection with 
highways, but shall not include any highway or street in a municipality 
having a population of two thousand five hundred or more as shown by 
the last available census, except that portion of any such highway or street 
along which within a distance of one mile the houses average more than 
two hundred feet apart. 

The term "State highway department" includes any State depart- 
ment, commission, board, or official having adequate powers and suitably 
equipped and organized to discharge to the satisfaction of the Secretary 
of Agriculture the duties herein required. 

The term "maintenance" means the constant making of needed repairs 
to preserve a smooth surfaced highway. 

The term "construction" means the supervising, inspecting, actual 
building, and all expenses incidental to the construction of a highway, 
except locating, surveying, mapping, and costs of rights of way. 

The term "reconstruction" means a widening or a rebuilding of the 
highway or any portion thereof to make it a continuous road, and of 
sufficient width and strength to care adequately for traffic needs. 

The term "forest roads" means roads wholly or partly within or 
adjacent to and serving the national forests. 



108 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The term " State funds" includes for the purposes of this Act funds 
raised under the authority of the State, or any political or other sub- 
division thereof, and made available for expenditure under the direct 
control of the State highway department. 

Sec. 3. All powers and duties of the Council of National Defense 
under the Act entitled "An Act making appropriations for the support 
of the Army for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1917, and for other pur- 
poses," approved August 29, 1916, in relation to highway or highway 
transport, are hereby transferred to the Secretary of Agriculture, and 
the Council of National Defense is directed to turn over to the Secretary 
of Agriculture the equipment, material, supplies, papers, maps, and 
documents utilized in the exercise of such powers. The powers and 
duties of agencies dealing with highways in the national parks or in 
military or naval reservations under the control of the United States 
Army or Navy, or with highways used principally for military or naval 
purposes, shall not be taken over by the Secretary of Agriculture, but 
such highways shall remain under the control and jurisdiction of such 
agencies. 

The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to cooperate with the State 
highway departments, and with the Department of the Interior in the 
construction of public highways within Indian reservations, and to pay 
the amount assumed therefor from the funds allotted or apportioned 
under this Act to the State wherein the reservation is located. 

Sec. 4. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall establish an ac- 
counting division which shall devise and install a proper method of keeping 
the accounts. 

Sec. 5. That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized 
and directed to transfer to the Secretary of Agriculture, upon his request, 
all war material, equipment, and supplies now or hereafter declared sur- 
plus from stock now on hand and not needed for the purposes of the 
War Department but suitable for use in the improvement of highways, 
and that the same shall be distributed among the highway departments 
of the several States to be used in the construction, reconstruction, and 
maintenance of highways, such distribution to be upon the same basis 
as that hereinafter provided for in this Act in the distribution of Federal- 
aid fund: Provided, That the Secretary of Agriculture, in his discretion, 
may reserve from such distribution not to exceed 10 per centum of such 
material, equipment, and supplies for use in the construction, recon- 
struction, and maintenance of national forest roads or other roads con- 
structed, reconstructed, or maintained under his direct supervision. 

Sec. 6. That in approving projects to receive Federal aid under the 
provisions of this Act the Secretary of Agriculture shall give preference 
to such projects as will expedite the completion of an adequate and con- 
nected system of highways, interstate in character. 

Before any projects are approved in any State, such State, through 
its State highway department, shall select or designate a system of high- 
ways not to exceed 7 per centum of the total highway mileage of such 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 109 

State as shown by the records of the State highway department at the 
time of the passage of this Act. 

Upon this system all Federal-aid apportionments shall be expended. 

Highways which may receive Federal aid shall be divided into two 
classes, one of which shall be known as primary or interstate highways, 
and shall not exceed three-sevenths of the total mileage which may 
receive Federal aid, and the other which shall connect or correlate there- 
with and be known as secondary or intercounty highways, and shall 
consist of the remainder of the mileage which may receive Federal aid. 

The Secretary of Agriculture shall have authority to approve in whole 
or in part the systems as designated or to require modifications or revisions 
thereof: Provided, That the States shall submit to the Secretary of Agri- 
culture for his approval any proposed revisions of the designated systems 
of highways above provided for. 

Not more than 60 per centum of all Federal aid allotted to any State 
shall be expended upon the primary or interstate highways until pro- 
vision has been made for the improvement of the entire system of such 
highways: Provided, That with the approval of any State highway de- 
partment the Secretary of Agriculture may approve the expenditure of 
more than 60 per centum of the Federal aid apportioned to such State 
upon the primary or interstate highways in such State. 

The Secretary of Agriculture may approve projects submitted by 
the State highway departments prior to the selection, designation, and 
approval of the system of Federal-aid highways herein provided for 
if he may reasonably anticipate that such projects will become a part 
of such system. 

Whenever provision has been made by any State for the completion 
and maintenance of a system of primary or interstate and secondary 
or intercounty highways equal to 7 per centum of the total mileage of 
such State, as required by this Act, said State, through its State highway 
department, by and with the approval of the Secretary of Agriculture, 
is hereby authorized to add to the mileage of primary or interstate and 
secondary or intercounty systems as funds become available for the con- 
struction and maintenance of such additional mileage. 

Sec. 7. That before any project shall be approved by the Secretary 
of Agriculture for any State such State shall make provisions for State 
funds required each year of such States by this Act for construction, 
reconstruction, and maintenance of all Federal-aid highways within the 
State, which funds shall be under the direct control of the State highway 
department. 

Sec. 8. That only such durable types of surface and kinds of 
materials shall be adopted for the construction and reconstruction of 
any highway which is a part of the primary or interstate and secondary 
or intercounty systems as will adequately meet the existing and probable 
future traffic needs and conditions thereon. The Secretary of Agriculture 
shall approve the types and width of construction and reconstruction 
and the character of improvement, repair, and maintenance in each 



110 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

case, consideration being given to the type and character which shall be 
best suited for each locality and to the probable character and extent of 
the future traffic. 

Sec. 9. That all highways constructed or reconstructed under the 
provisions of this Act shall be free from tolls of all kinds. 

That all highways in the primary or interstate system constructed 
after the passage of this Act shall have a right of way of ample width 
and a wearing surface of an adequate width which shall not be less than 
eighteen feet, unless, in the opinion of the Secretary of Agriculture, it 
is rendered impracticable by physical conditions, excessive costs, probable 
traffic requirements, or legal obstacles. 

Sec. 10. That when any State shall have met the requirements of 
this Act, the Secretary of the Treasury, upon receipt of certification 
from the governor of such State to such effect, approved by the Secretary 
of Agriculture, shall immediately make available to such State, for the 
purpose set forth in this Act, the sum apportioned to such State as herein 
provided. 

Sec. 11. That any State having complied with the provisions of this 
Act, and desiring to avail itself of the benefits thereof, shall by its State 
highway department submit to the Secretary of Agriculture project 
statements setting forth proposed construction or reconstruction of 
any primary or interstate, or secondary or intercounty highway therein. 
If the Secretary of Agriculture approve the project, the State highway 
department shall furnish to him such surveys, plans, specifications, and 
estimates therefor as he may require; items included for engineering, 
inspection, and unforeseen contingencies shall not exceed 10 per centum 
of the total estimated cost of its construction. 

That when the Secretary of Agriculture approves such surveys, plans, 
specifications, and estimates, he shall notify the State highway depart- 
ment and immediately certify the fact to the Secretary of the Treasury. 
The Secretary of the Treasury shall thereupon set aside the share of the 
United States payable under this Act on account of such projects, which 
shall not exceed 50 per centum of the total estimated cost thereof, except 
that in the case of any State containing unappropriated public lands 
exceeding 5 per centum of the total area of all lands in the State, the 
share of the United States payable under this Act on account of such 
projects shall not exceed 50 per centum of the total estimated cost thereof 
plus a percentage of such estimated cost equal to one-half of the per- 
centage which the area of the unappropriated public lands in such State 
bears to the total area of such State: Provided, That the limitation of 
payments not to exceed $20,000 per mile, under existing law, which the 
Secretary of Agriculture may make be, and the same is hereby, increased 
in proportion to the increased percentage of Federal aid authorized by 
this section: Provided further, That these provisions relative to the public- 
land States shall apply to all unobligated or unmatched funds appro- 
priated by the Federal Aid Act and payment for approved projects upon 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. Ill 

which actual building construction work had not begun on the 30th day 
of June, 1921. 

Sec. 12. That the construction and reconstruction of the highways 
or parts of highways under the provisions of this Act, and all contracts, 
plans, specifications, and estimates relating thereto, shall be undertaken 
by the State highway departments subject to the approval of the Secretary 
of Agriculture. The construction and reconstruction work and labor in 
each State shall be done in accordance with its laws and under the direct 
supervision of the State highway department, subject to the inspection 
and approval of the Secretary of Agriculture and in accordance with the 
rules and regulations pursuant to this Act. 

Sec. 13. That when the Secretary of Agriculture shall find that any 
project approved by him has been constructed or reconstructed in com- 
pliance with said plans and specifications, he shall cause to be paid to the 
proper authorities of said State the amount set aside for said project. 

That the Secretary of Agriculture may, in his discretion, from time to 
time, make payments on such construction or reconstruction as the work 
progresses, but these payments, including previous payments, if any, 
shall not be more than the United States pro rata part of the value of the 
labor and materials which have been actually put into such construction 
or reconstruction in conformity to said plans and specifications. The 
Secretary of Agriculture and the State highway department of each 
State may jointly determine at what time and in what amounts payments 
as work progresses shall be made under this Act. 

Such payments shall be made by the Secretary of the Treasury, on 
warrants drawn by the Secretary of Agriculture, to such official or officials 
or depository as may be designated by the State highway department 
and authorized under the laws of the State to receive public funds of the 
State. 

Sec. 14. That should any State fail to maintain any highway within 
its boundaries after construction or reconstruction under the provisions 
of this Act, the Secretary of Agriculture shall then serve notice upon the 
State highway department of that fact, and if within ninety days after 
receipt of such notice said highway has not been placed in proper con- 
dition of maintenance, the Secretary of Agriculture shall proceed im- 
mediately to have such highway placed in a proper condition of main- 
tenance and charge the cost thereof against the Federal funds allotted to 
such State, and shall refuse to approve any other project in such State, 
except as hereinafter provided. 

Upon the reimbursement by the State of the amount expended by 
the Federal Government for such maintenance, said amount shall be 
paid into the Federal highway fund for reapportionment among all the 
States for the construction of roads under this Act, and the Secretary 
of Agriculture shall then approve further projects submitted by the 
State as in this Act provided. 

Whenever it shall become necessary for the Secretary of Agriculture 



112 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

under the provisions of this Act to place any highway in a proper con- 
dition of maintenance the Secretary of Agriculture shall contract with 
some responsible party or parties for doing such work: Provided, how- 
ever, That in case he is not able to secure a satisfactory contract he may 
purchase, lease, hire, or otherwise obtain all necessary supplies, equip- 
ment, and labor, and may operate and maintain such motor and other 
equipment and facilities as in his judgment are necessary for the proper 
and efficient performance of his functions. 

Sec. 15. That within two years after this Act takes effect the Secre- 
tary of Agriculture shall prepare, publish, and distribute a map showing 
the highways and forest roads that have been selected and approved as 
a part of the primary or interstate, and the secondary or intercounty 
sjrstems, and at least annually thereafter shall publish supplementary 
maps showing his program and the progress made in selection, construc- 
tion, and reconstruction. 

Sec. 16. That for the purpose of this Act the consent of the United 
States is hereby given to any railroad or canal company to convey to 
the highway department of any State any part of its right of way or other 
property in that State acquired by grant from the United States. 

Sec. 17. That if the Secretary of Agriculture determines that any 
part of the public lands or reservations of the United States is reasonably 
necessary for the right of way of any highway or forest road or as a source 
of materials for the construction or maintenance of any such highway 
or forest road adjacent to such lands or reservations, the Secretary of 
Agriculture shall file with the Secretary of the department supervising 
the administration of such land or reservation a map showing the portion 
of such lands or reservations which it is desired to appropriate. 

If within a period of four months after such filing the said Secretary 
shall not have certified to the Secretary of Agriculture that the proposed 
appropriation of such land or material is contrary to the public interest 
or inconsistent with the purposes for which such land or materials have 
been reserved, or shall have agreed to the appropriation and transfer 
under conditions which he deems necessary for the adequate protection 
and utilization of the reserve, then such land and materials may be ap- 
propriated and transferred to the State highway department for such 
purposes and subject to the conditions so specified. 

If at any time the need for any such lands or materials for such pur- 
poses shall no longer exist, notice of the fact shall be given by the State 
highway department to the Secretary of Agriculture, and such lands or 
materials shall immediately revert to the control of the Secretary of the 
department from which they had been appropriated. 

Sec. 18. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall prescribe and pro- 
mulgate all needful rules and regulations for the carrying out of the pro- 
visions of this Act, including such recommendations to the Congress and 
the State highway departments as he may deem necessary for preserving 
and protecting the highways and insuring the safety of traffic thereon. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 113 

Sec. 19. That on or before the first Monday in December of each 
year the Secretary of Agriculture shall make a report to Congress, which 
shall include a detailed statement of the work done, the status of each 
project undertaken, the allocation of appropriations, an itemized state- 
ment of the expenditures and receipts during the preceding fiscal year 
under this Act, an itemized statement of the traveling and other expenses, 
including a list of employees, their duties, salaries, and traveling ex- 
penses, if any, and his recommendations, if any, for new legislation amend- 
ing or supplementing this Act. The Secretary of Agriculture shall also 
make such special reports as Congress may request. 

Sec. 20. That for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this 
Act there is hereby appropriated, out of the moneys in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, $75,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1922, $25,000,000 of which shall become immediately available, and 
$50,000,000 of which shall become available January 1, 1922. 

Sec. 21. That so much, not to exceed 2| per centum, of all moneys 
hereby or hereafter appropriated for expenditure under the provisions 
of this Act, as the Secretary of Agriculture may deem necessary for 
administering the provisions of this Act and for carrying on necessary 
highway research and investigational studies independently or in co- 
operation with the State highway departments and other research agencies, 
and for publishing the results thereof, shall be deducted for such purposes, 
available until expended. 

Within sixty days after the close of each fiscal year the Secretary of 
Agriculture shall determine what part, if any, of the sums theretofore 
deducted for such purposes will not be needed and apportion such part, 
if any, for the fiscal year then current in the same manner and on the 
same basis as are other amounts authorized by this Act apportioned 
among all the States, and shall certify such apportionment to the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury and to the State highway departments. 

The Secretary of Agriculture, after making the deduction authorized 
by this section, shall apportion the remainder of the appropriation made 
for expenditure under the provision of the Act for the fiscal year among 
the several States in the following manner: One-third in the ratio which 
the area of each State bears to the total area of all the States; one-third 
in the ratio which the population of each State bears to the total popula- 
tion of all the States, as shown by the latest available Federal census; 
one-third in the ratio which the mileage of rural delivery routes and 
star routes in each State bears to the total mileage of rural delivery and 
star routes in all the States at the close of the next preceding fiscal year, 
as shown by certificate of the Postmaster General, which he is directed 
to make and furnish annually to the Secretary of Agriculture: Provided, 
That no State shall receive less than one-half of 1 per centum of each 
year's allotment. All moneys herein or hereafter appropriated for ex- 
penditure under the provisions of this Act shall be available until the 
close of the second succeeding fiscal year for which apportionment was 



114 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

made : Provided further, That any sums apportioned to any State under 
the provisions of the Act entitled "An Act to provide that the United 
States shall aid the States in the construction of rural post roads, and for 
other purposes," approved July 11, 1916, and all Acts amendatory thereof 
and supplemental thereto, shall be available for expenditure in that 
State for the purpose set forth in such Acts until two years after the 
close of the respective fiscal years for which any such sums become avail- 
able, and any amount so apportioned remaining unexpended at the end 
of the period during which it is available for expenditure under the terms 
of such Acts shall be reapportioned according to the provisions of the 
Act entitled "An Act to provide that the United States shall aid the 
States in the construction of rural post roads, and for other purposes, " 
approved July 11, 1916: And provided further, That any amount appor- 
tioned under the provisions of this Act unexpended at the end of the 
period during which it is available for expenditure under the terms of 
this section shall be reapportioned within sixty days thereafter to all 
the States in the same manner and on the same basis, and certified to 
the Secretary of the Treasury and the State highway departments in the 
same way as if it were being apportioned under this Act for the first time. 

Sec. 22. That within sixty days after the approval of this Act the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall certify to the Secretary of the Treasury 
and to each of the State highway departments the sum he has estimated 
to be deducted for administering the provisions of this Act and the sums 
which he has apportioned to each State for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1922, and on or before January 20 next preceding the commencement 
of each succeeding fiscal year, and shall make like certificates for each 
fiscal year. 

Sec. 23. That out of the moneys in the Treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, there is hereby appropriated for the survey, construction, 
reconstruction, and maintenance of forest roads and trails, the sum of 
$5,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1922, available immediately 
and until expended, and $10,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1923, available until expended. 

(a) Fifty per centum, but not to exceed $3,000,000 for any one fiscal 
year, of the appropriation made or that may hereafter be made for ex- 
penditure under the provisions of this section shall be expended under 
the direct supervision of the Secretary of Agriculture in the survey, 
construction, reconstruction, and maintenance of roads and trails of 
primary importance for the protection, administration, and utilization of 
the national forests, or when necessary, for the use and development of 
the resources upon which communities within or adjacent to the national 
forests are dependent, and shall be apportioned among the several States, 
Alaska, and Porto Rico by the Secretary of Agriculture, according to the 
relative needs of the various national forests, taking into consideration 
the existing transportation facilities, value of timber, or other resources 
served, relative fire danger, and comparative difficulties of road and trail 
construction. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 115 

The balance of such appropriations shall be expended by the Secretary 
of Agriculture in the survey, construction, reconstruction, and main- 
tenance of forest roads of primary importance to the State, counties, 
or communities within, adjoining, or adjacent to the national forests, 
and shall be prorated and apportioned by the Secretary of Agriculture 
for expenditures in the several States, Alaska, and Porto Rico, according 
to the area and value of the land owned by the Government within the 
national forests therein as determined by the Secretary of Agriculture 
from such information, investigation, sources, and departments as the 
Secretary of Agriculture may deem most accurate. 

(b) Cooperation of Territories, States, and civil subdivisions thereof 
may be accepted but shall not be required by the Secretary of Agriculture. 

(c) The Secretary of Agriculture may enter into contracts with any 
Territory, State, or civil subdivision thereof for the construction, recon- 
struction, or maintenance of any forest road or trail or part thereof. 

(d) Construction work on forest roads or trails estimated to cost 
$5,000 or more per mile, exclusive of bridges, shall be advertised and 
let to contract. 

If such estimated cost is less than $5,000 per mile, or if, after proper 
advertising, no acceptable bid is received, or the bids are deemed ex- 
cessive, the work may be done by the Secretary of Agriculture on his 
own account; and for such purpose the Secretary of Agriculture may 
purchase, lease, hire, rent, or otherwise obtain all necessary supplies, 
materials, tools, equipment, and facilities required to perform the work. 

The appropriation made in this section or that may hereafter be made 
for expenditure under the provisions of this section may be expended for 
the purpose herein authorized and for the payment of wages, salaries, and 
other expenses for help employed in connection with such work. 

Sec. 24. That in any State where the existing constitution or laws 
will not permit the State to provide revenues for the construction, recon- 
struction, or maintenance of highways, the Secretary of Agriculture 
shall continue to approve projects for said State until three years after 
the passage of this Act, if he shall find that said State has complied with 
the provisions of this Act in so far as its existing constitution and laws 
will permit. 

Sec. 25. That if any provision of this Act, or the application thereof 
to any person or circumstances, shall be held invalid, the validity of 
the remainder of the Act and of the application of such provision to 
other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby. 

Sec. 26. That all Acts or parts of Acts in any way inconsistent with 
the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed, and this Act shall take 
effect on its passage. 

Approved, November 9, 1921. 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



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44,497 47 

24,460 44 
46,856 28 
38,043 13 

72,464 75 

55,456 27 
40,239 41 
23,212 78 

163,704 19 
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Reading line 
Canton line 
Easton line 
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Marlborough line to Wayland 
Wayland line to Wayland line 
Amherst line 

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Salem line .... 
Rhode Island line to bridge ve 
Rehoboth line to Somerset lin 






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to Dec. 1, 
1921. 


$13,258 85 

22,570 37 

69,241 51 
16,439 39 

32,765 34 

46,047 77 
14,422 98 

65,874 59 

58,726 45 
16,212 44 
47,746 81 
32,944 46 
30,095 76 
8,080 05 

64,722 35 

39,175 24 

48,539 03 

54,966 34 
34,688 22 


Length 

con- 
structed 
(Miles). 


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Beverly line to Hamilton line . 
Northborough line . 
Southborough line 
Worcester line to Sterling line . 
Brockton line to Bridgewater line 
Brookfield line .... 
Warren line .... 
Ware line to Ware line 
West Springfield line 
Russell line .... 
Littleton line to Chelmsford line 
Westford Centre 
Fitchburg line to Gardner line 
Ashburnham line to Fitchburg line 
Newburyport line to Groveland line 
Wayland line .... 
Dartmouth line to Fall River line 
Westfield line .... 
Tisbury line to Chilmark line . 
Norwood line to Dedham line . 
Fore River Bridge 
Hingham line .... 
Abington line .... 
Holbrook line to Abington line 
Hatfield line to Deerfield line . 
Brockton line .... 
East Bridgewater line to Abington h 
Springfield line to Palmer line 
Goshen line .... 






1897-1901-3-8 . 

1897 

1903-6 

1897-8-1915-13 . 

1900-1-2-4 . 

1899-1900-1 

1905-13 

1899 .... 

1894-6-8-9 . 

1902-1-1900-1899-8 . 

1902-12 

1903 .... 

1894-5-6-7-8-9-1918-3 

1915 .... 

1895-6-7-1909-6-5-4-3 

1899-8 

1913-1898-7-6-4-1917 . 

1912-6-5-1895-6 . 

1895-6-7-1904 . 

1916-1899-1900 . 

1895-7-5-1913 . 

1915 .... 

1910-8-7-4-3 

1894 .... 

1906-5-13-5-4-3-2-1-1899 

1894-5-6 . 

1913-14 

1901-1897-6-5-1901-3-13- 3H 

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132 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contract Prices on State Highway 







Excavation. 


>> 

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Bituminous 
Surfacing. 


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Town or Citt. 


Contractor. 


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Acton Bridge 


B. E. Savage . 


- 


- 


$4 00 


- 


- 


$0 50 


- 


_ 


Agawam . 


Hassam Paving Company 


$1 20 


$1 35 


6 00 


$25 00 


- 


17 


- 


- 


Andover 


James H. Fannon . 


- 


- 


4 00 


25 00 


- 


18 


- 


- 


Ashby 
Ashfield 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 
A. Palladino . 


1 50 
1 00 


1 00 


4 00 
2 00 


30 00 
12 00 


- 


23 


- 


- 


Ashland Bridge . 


Perini & Sons 


1 50 


1 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Barre-Oakham . 


Canton Engineering Com- 


1 20 


1 25 


4 00 


22 00 


_ 


17 


_ 


_ 


Bernardston 
Boston 


pany. 

Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

J. C. Coleman 


1 25 
60 


- 


3 00 

5 00 


25 00 
15 00 


- 


16 
20 


- 


- 


Brookfield-West Brook- 
field. 
Burlington . 

Canton 


Middlesex Construction 

Company. 
Sweeney Construction 

Company. 
A. J. Mitchell 


1 30 

90 

1 50 


1 50 
1 25 


4 00 
7 00 

5 00 


20 00 
10 00 
22 50 


- 


09 
17 


- 


$13 25 


Clinton 


Fred E.Ellis . 


1 35 


1 35 


6 00 


- 


- 


- 


$0 24 


- 


Danvers 


William A. Jones . 


1 15 


- 


2 50 


- 


- 


19 


- 


- 


Danvers-Topsfield 


T.J. McCue . 


1 25 


1 00 


4 00 


14 00 


- 


15| 


- 


- 


Dracut 

East Bridgewater 


Hanscom Construction 

Company. 
J. A. Houle . 


1 40 


1 40 


3 00 


30 00 


- 


19 


- 


- 


East Brookfield . 


Carlo Bianchi & Co. 


2 25 


2 25 


- 


25 00 


- 


- 


- 


15 50 


East Brookfield-Spencer 


Hinman & Rudiger 


2 00 


- 


5 00 


30 00 


- 


- 


35 


- 


Egremont . 


D. S. McGrath, Inc. 


1 00 


1 25 


3 00 


17 00 


- 


19 


- 


- 


Framingham 


A. Luchini & Son . 


1 15 


- 


3 00 


25 00 


- 


16 


- 


- 


Gill . 


A. Pallato 


1 00 


1 00 


2 50 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Hardwick . 
Hingham . 
Holbrook . 


Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

W. H. Connor & Sons 
Company. 

Powers Brothers 


1 00 
1 00 
1 25 


1 00 
1 25 


5 00 
5 00 
2 50 


20 00 
16 00 


- 


16 


17 


- 


Holden 


G. E. Greenough 


1 20 


- 


2 00 


15 00 


- 


16 


- 


- 


Lanesborough-New Ash- 
ford- Williamstown. 
Leicester . 


Rendle-Stoddard . 
C.E.Horne . 


1 50 


1 25 


6 00 
6 00 


25 00 


- 


- 


- 


14 50 


Littleton . 


T.J.McCue . 


1 40 


90 


4 50 


18 00 


- 


14f 


- 


- 


Littleton . 


T. J. McCue . 


1 50 


- 


4 00 


20 00 


- 


15| 


- 


- 


Lynnfield . 

Marblehead-Swamp- 
scott. 


Hanscom Construction 

Company. 
McDonough . . 


95 
1 25 


- 


5 00 
2 00 


20 00 


- 


15 
17 


- 


- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



133 



Construction in 1921. 



Broken 

Stone. 


Pipe Culverts (Lineal Foot). 






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£ 


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o 

Eh 

a 

o 


o 

8 


O 

a 


o 

.2 

a 
s 
s 

is 


43 
o 

C 

't 


43* 
Q 

.2 

a 
<o 
a> 

3 
o 
Ph 


o 


a 

.2 

a 
a> 
o 


o 

(H 

t* 
O 

CQ 
— .^ 

0) (- 
> 03 
0S>H 

a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


$39 00 


$2 00 


$2 70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$90 00 


30 00 


1 20 


- 


$3 90 


- 


$1 75 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


5 30 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


$2 50 


$3 00 


$0 90 


$2 25 


$5 00 


- 


35 00 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


2 50 


- 


1 75 


- 


- 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


- 


- 


35 00 


- 


- 


3 70 


- 


1 25 


- 


3 25 


- 


- 


7 00 


65 


2 75 


4 00 


- 


30 00 


1 50 


- 


3 50 


$1 75 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 00 


3 00 


100 00 


30 00 


1 25 


2 25 


- 


- 


90 


$1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 00 


30 00 


- 


1 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


70 


- 


5 00 


- 


35 00 


1 20 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


95 


1 15 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 75 


- 


70 00 


- 


1 75 


4 20 


5 35 


1 50 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


- 


75 00 


- 


1 35 


2 95 


- 


- 


1 65 


1 95 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 00 


- 


1 20 


- 


2 50 


1 50 


2 00 


2 50 


- 


- 


- 


3 25 


40 


- 


5 00 


65 00 


17 00 


90 


3 25 


- 


- 


1 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


18 55 


1 15 


- 


- 


- 


2 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 20 


3 75 


- 


- 


40 00 


2 50 


- 


4 25 


1 25 


1 50 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


2 50 


75 


2 40 


4 00 


50 00 


20 00 


1 10 


3 80 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 00 


- 


1 35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 50 


- 


- 


3 50 


50 


1 60 


- 


- 


25 00 


1 30 


- 


- 


1 60 


1 75 


- 


4 00 


- 


5 00 


- 


75 


2 15 


- 


- 


- 


1 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 50 


2 60 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70 


- 


- 


65 00 


20 00 


1 25 


2 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


1 75 


- 


2 20 


- 


75 00 


20 00 


1 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


23 00 


2 50 


4 00 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


5 00 


- 


35 00 


2 00 


2 20 


3 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


' - 


- 


- 


65 


- 


4 00 


- 


22 00 


1 15 


2 60 


3 50 


- 


1 50 


- 


4 00 


- 


- 


6 20 


65 


- 


4 00 


75 00 


23 00 


1 25 


2 60 


- 


- 


1 35 


1 60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70 


- 


3 00 


75 00 


25 00 


1 15 












~ 


— 


— 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


100 00 


- 


1 60 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contract Prices on State Highway 







Excavation. 


>> 

h 

a 
o 

GO 


bituminous 
Surfacing. 


a 
13 

3 
O 


Town or C 


itt. Contractor. 


T3 
h 

13 

3 

o 

El 

o3 


T3 
W 03 

3 

o 

o 

O 

n 


^5 

03 

3 

o 

So 

a> 


Plain Concrete Ma 
(Cubic Yard). 


1 

a 

O . 

"c 
00 

§b 

e 

•a <u 
a cd 
3 u 

S 


"a 

"o3 
• O 

"oS 
~C 
O, 
03 

< 


'a 


03 
O 

<- 
03 


'3 

•2 

3 
CQ 

03 s-Z. 

%-a 

O 03 




Mendon-Uxbridg 


e J. H. Fannon . 


$1 25 


- 


$6 00 


$25 00 


- 


- 


$0 18 


$13 00 


Middlefield-Peru 


. C. Bianchi & Co. . 


95 


$1 00 


2 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Middleton-Danv 


ers . F.E.Ellis . 


1 15 


- 


3 00 


25 00 


- 


$0 17 


- 


- 


Millbury . 


. Carlo Bianchi & Co. 


1 15 


- 


5 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


12 50 


Monterey . 


. Hoyt Construction Com- 


1 10 


1 00 


7 00 


20 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


North Adams 


pany. 
. F.T.Ley&Co. . 


1 25 


- 


5 00 


15 00 


- 


- 


- 


10 80 


Norton 


Z. L. Canedy . 


1 25 


1 80 


5 00 


20 00 


- 


22 


- 


- 


Norwell 


. J. W. O'Connell . 


1 50 


1 25 


- 


- 


- 


16 


- 


- 


Oxford 


D'Onfro Brothers . 


90 


2 00 


5 00 

1 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Palmer 


. W. C. Tannatt, Jr. . 


1 50 


1 80 


4 00 


30 00 


- 


- 


- 


15 33 


Pembroke . 


. Atwood Thomas Company 


90 


1 25 


4 50 


20 00 


$7 00 


- 


- 


- 


Plainfield-Cumm 


ngton Geo. T. Seabury, Inc. 


1 00 


90 


3 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Plympton . 


. M. F. Roach . 


90 


- 


4 50 


18 00 


7 45 


- 


- 


- 


Quincy 


. A. G. Tomasello 


1 35 


- 


5 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


- 


14 00 


Rutland 


. A. Palladino . 


1 20 


- 


5 00 


15 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Seekonk 


. Germain & Staples . 


1 10 


- 


10 00 


- 


- 


16 


- 


- 


Sterling 


. Geo. E. Greenough . 


1 50 


- 


- 


15 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Stoughton . 


Carlo Bianchi & Co. 


1 50 


- 


6 00 


25 00 


- 


20 


- 


12 00 


Stoughton . 


. Cavanaugh Brothers 


1 00 


- 


6 00 


- 


- 


17 


- 


- 


Upton 


. R.H. Newell. 


1 20 


1 50 


8 50 


30 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Waltham . 


. S.O.Hoyt . 


1 15 


- 


5 00 


20 00 


- 


17 


- 


- 


Washington 


. Luigi Carchia Company . 


2 00 


- 


6 00 


30 00 


- 


25 


- 


- 


Watertown 


. T.J.McCue . . 


1 45 


- 


5 00 


- 


- 


16 


- 


- 


Westborough 


. G. E. Greenough 


1 20 


- 


2 00 


25 00 


- 


- 


25 


- 


West Bridgewater 


. M. F. Roach . 


1 10 


- 


- 


20 00 


9 00 


- 


- 


- 


West Springfield . 


. Hoyt Construction Com- 


1 35 


- 


- 


15 00 


- 


- 


m 


10 75 


Winchendon-Ten 


pany. 

ipleton Lane Construction Cor- 
poration. 

irn . Powers Brothers 


1 10 


1 00 


3 00 


20 00 


- 


- 


14 


- 


Winchester- Wobi 


1 10 


- 


2 50 


20 00 


- 


15| 


- 


- 


Woburn 


. B. E. Savage . 


- 


- 


- 


25 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Wrentham . 


. Canedy Construction Com- 
pany. 


1 00 


- 


4 00 


12 50 


- 


16* 


- 


— 





PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



135 



Construction in 1921 — Concluded. 



Broken 

Stone. 


Pipe Culverts (Lineal Foot). 














o 

3 








o 

o 
fa 

13 
9 

a 

3. 

bD 

a 

'3 
a 
eg 

fa 


O 

bO 

g 53 


-a 
q 

in 

a 

O 


o 
c3 
g, 

.i 

En 
CS 

m 

-g 

O 


a> cj 

•11 

'53 m 


O 




o 


clay. 


CORRUGATED IRON. 


ft 


'a 
o 
H 

13 

W 

o 

h5 


o 

.5 
h 

H 


a 
"I 

H 


o 
a 
*T 
a 
33 

V 


o 

a 
i 


o 

.5 

A 
e 
s 

o 


a 

'§ 

a 
S 

m 


^3 
o 

a 
S 

M 


o 

« 

— *o 

CU t- 
> c3 

a 


- 


$3 25 


$1 50 


- 


- 


$4 00 


- 


$6 50 


$8 00 


$0 80 


$3 00 


$3 00 


$100 00 


$30 00 


$1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


3 00 


- 


1 95 


- 


- 


25 00 


2 00 


- 


2 90 


- 


$1 70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 


- 


5 00 


75 00 


36 00 


1 20 


- 


- 


1 25 


1 50 


$1 80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 


+■ 




125 00 


- 


1 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 70 


- 


- 


3 25 


- 


2 15 


- 


- 


25 00 


1 15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 20 


- 


4 90 


5 85 


90 


- 


- 


- 


18 00 


1 05 


- 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


3 25 


$3 50 


- 


- 


75 


- 


- 


75 00 


30 00 


2 00 


$3 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


3 00 


5 00 


- 


30 00 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


6 00 


- 


- 


40 00 


1 80 


3 25 


- 


- 


1 45 


1 85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 


- 


- 


70 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 90 


2 15 


2 00 


- 


2 40 


2 65 


- 


1 75 


- 


- 


- 


90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 60 


- 


- 


- 


60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


5 00 


75 00 


30 00 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


3 00 


- 


2 50 


- 


- 


- 


1 30 


3 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 00 


- 


1 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 50 


5 00 


- 


- 


1 20 


3 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


- 


100 00 


30 00 


1 20 


2 50 


3 90 


1 10 


1 45 


1 60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 00 


- 


1 10 


2 90 


- 


2 00 


2 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


- 


2 50 


90 00 


35 00 


- 


- 


3 80 


- 


2 30 


2 90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


2 50 


5 00 


68 80 


25 00 


1 75 


3 50 


4 00 


- 


- 


- 


2 25 


- 


2 60 


3 00 


60 


3 50 


5 00 


- 


40 00 


3 00 


- 


3 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


85 00 


- 


1 30 


- 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 


2 50 


- 


100 00 


35 00 


2 00 


3 25 


- 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70 00 


- 


- 


3 25 


- 


- 


1 75 


- 


1 50 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


- 


75 00 


- 


1 50 


- 


3 75 


- 


1 75 


- 


4 00 


- 


5 00 


- 


75 


3 75 


4 00 


100 00 


35 00 


1 50 


- 


2 85 


- 


1 60 


2 15 


5 00 


- 


- 


- 


85 


- 


- 


75 00 


30 00 


1 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 00 


2 00 






1 75 


2 00 




" 




— 


— 


75 


— 


- 


60 00 


- 


1 15 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Care of Shade Trees on State Highways. 

List of Towns and Cities in which Work has been done by the State Forester's 
Department in cleaning and spraying Trees on State Highways for sup- 
pressing Gypsy and Brown-tail Moths and Elm-leaf Beetles, and the 
Amount expended in Each Municipality during the year. 



Town. 


Amount. 


Town. 


Amount. 


Abington 


$75 81 


Duxbury 


$165 11 


Acton 








181 81 


East Bridgewater 






67 34 


Amesbury 








56 28 


Eastham . 






35 20 


Andover . 








110 10 


Essex 








24 39 


Ashby 








128 67 


Falmouth . 








544 59 


Ashburnham 








123 60 


Fitchburg . 








90 70 


Ashland 








70 45 


Foxborough 








77 10 


Attleboro . 








55 00 


Framingham 








194 96 


Avon . 








11 50 


Franklin 








55 00 


Ayer . 








77 53 


Freetown . 








101 00 


Barnstable 








306 82 


Gloucester 








51 89 


Bedford 








66 90 


Grafton 








85 75 


Bellingham 








27 50 


Groton 








77 61 


Berkley 








55 00 


Groveland 








66 52 


Beverly 








118 73 


Hamilton . 








94 89 


Billerica 








98 75 


Hanover . 








110 00 


Blackstone 








13 88 


Harvard . 








60 30 


Bourne 








253 13 


Harwich . 








106 40 


Boxborough 








114 08 


Haverhill . 








201 75 


Braintree . 








226 56 


Hingham . 








59 74 


Brewster . 








67 55 


Holbrook . 








78 00 


Bridgewater 








96 98 


Holliston . 








104 06 


Burlington 








93 26 


Hudson 








34 47 


Canton 








110 00 


Ipswich 








114 86 


Chatham . 








37 95 


Kingston . 








78 11 


Chelmsford 








129 80 


Lakeville . 








155 81 


Cohasset . 








75 02 


Lancaster . 








22 00 


Concord 








149 31 


Leominster 








62 40 


Danvers . 








37 18 


Lexington . 








123 80 


Dedham . 








52 00 


Lincoln 








78 57 


Dennis 








75 00 


Littleton . 








97 23 


Dighton 








156 00 


Lowell 








89 67 


Dover 








124 35 


Lunenburg 








98 56 


Dracut 








114 90 


Mansfield . 








55 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



137 



List of Towns and Cities in which Work, etc. — Concluded. 



Town. 


Amount. 


Town. 


Amount. 


Marlborough . 


$131 10 


Seekonk 


$92 00 


Marshfield 








76 69 


Shirley 








57 00 


Mashpee . 








150 00 


Shrewsbury 








40 80 


Melrose 








45 98 


Somerset . 








184 00 


Merrimac . 








38 95 


Southborough 








98 08 


Methuen . 








122 00 


Sterling 








105 00 


Middleborough 








202 89 


Stoneham . 








90 75 


Middleton . 








22 60 


Stoughton . 








180 00 


Millville . 








13 86 


Sudbury . 








117 16 


Milton 








11 50 


Swansea 








202 00 


Natick 








98 62 


Taunton . 








110 00 


Needham . 








79 46 


Templeton 








20 12 


Newbury . 








74 96 


Tewksbury 








116 70 


Newburyport 








37 40 


Townsend 








152 94 


Norfolk 








37 20 


Truro 








111 00 


North Andover 






164 75 


Tyngsborough 








154 00 


North Attle borough 






101 00 


Uxbridge . 








13 86 


Northborough . 






173 22 


Walpole 








174 00 


North Reading 






83 00 


Wareham . 








220 28 


Norton 






172 80 


Wayland . 








112 41 


Norwell 








48 20 


Wellfleet . 








25 05 


Norwood . 








95 10 


Wenham . 








113 82 


Orleans 








98 92 


Westborough 








75 51 


Pembroke . 








218 05 


West Boylston 








65 70 


Pepperell . 








89 74 


West Bridgewat( 


$r 






56 86 


Plamville . 








46 00 


Westford . 








158 40 


Plymouth . 








402 64 


Westminster 








74 49 


Princeton . 








12 50 


West Newbury . 








116 70 


Randolph . 








101 00 


Weston 








110 72 


Raynham . 








55 00 


Westwood . 








27 50 


Reading 








129 50 


Weymouth 








153 60 


Rehoboth . 








184 00 


Wilmington 








68 93 


Rochester . 








39 54 


Winchendon 








44 50 


Rockland . 








14 89 


Winchester 








78 60 


Rockport . 








13 18 


Woburn 








233 90 


Rowley 








106 35 


Wrentham 








202 00 


Salisbury . 








170 65 
222 76 


Yarmouth 
Total . 








121 30 


Sandwich . 


$15,000 00 


Scituate 








80 14 

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REGISTRY OF MOTOR VEHICLES 



REGISTRY OF MOTOR VEHICLES. 



Motor Vehicle Deaths, Injuries, Collisions. 

During the year 1921 the campaign inaugurated early in 
1920 to reduce accidents and make the highways of the Corn- 
wealth safer for all who use them was carried on with un- 
abated vigor both by the police throughout the Common- 
wealth and the Department. The result attained was striking, 
particularly with reference to the reduction in the number of 
persons injured. 

In 1919 there were 16,287 persons injured, in 1920 there 
were 21,182 injured, while in 1921 there were only 11,487 
persons injured, notwithstanding the fact that there were 
111,909 more automobiles on the highways of the Common- 
wealth than in 1919, and 53,016 more than there were in 1920. 

The principal reason for this great reduction was without 
question the new regulation put into effect by the registrar on 
Dec. 1, 1920, making it necessary for every one to pass an 
examination before an original license was issued to him. 

A close study of the following tables will indicate the great 
improvement that has taken place on the highways during the 
past two years : — 

Numbek of Persons Killed and Injured. 











Killed. 


Injured. 




1920. 


1921. 


1920. 


1921. 


Pedestrians, by autos 
Pedestrians, by motor cycles 
Occupants of autos . 
Motor cycle riders . 
Bicycle riders . 
Occupants of carriages 
Persons near street cars . 








314 

2 

114 

28 

12 

1 

10 


339 

2 

159 

28 

14 

2 


7,664 
67 
11,055 
870 
868 
344 
218 


6,484 

40 

3,744 

424 

594 

173 

28 


Totals 


481 


544 


21,086 


11,487 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Children Killed and Injured ln 1920 and 1921. 



Killed: 
Boys 
Girls . 

Injured: 
Boys 
Girls . 




1921. 



139) 
57 



2,4461 



196 



987 



\ 3,433 



Number of Collisions. 



1920. 



1921. 



Autos v. pedestrians 
Autos v. autos 
Autos v. carriages . 
Autos v. bicycles . 
Autos v. trolley cars 
Autos v. poles, etc. 
Autos v. trains 
Autos v. motorcycles 
Motor cycles v. pedestrians 
Totals 

In the daytime 
After dark 
Totals 



7,049 


6,895 


12,297 


12,508 


639 


743 


850 


793 


790 


783 


1,338 


1,631 


39 


64 


396 


725 


69 


59 


23,467 


24,201 


19,105 


18,616 


4,362 


5,585 



23,467 



24,201 



Number of Suspensions and Revocations for 1920 

and 1921. 

The statements following show the action taken by the 
registrar, and the causes therefor: — 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



143 



Analysis of Suspensions and Revocations. 



1920. 



1921. 



Licenses suspended 

Licenses revoked .... 

Rights suspended .... 

Registration certificates suspended 

Registration certificates revoked . 

Registration certificates and licenses suspended 

Registration certificates and licenses revoked 

Registration certificates revoked and rights suspended 

Rights to have car operated in Massachusetts suspended 

Registration certificates canceled 

Licenses canceled . 

Totals .... 
Resulting from investigations 
Resulting from court convictions 
Resulting from formal complaints 
Resulting from police complaints 

Totals 



1,270 

1,172 

349 

82 
67 



2,944 



1,940 

1,119 

629 

75 

565 

36 

483 

47 

5 



2,944 


4,899 


1,242 


2,340 


1,694 


2,452 


8 


1 


- 


106 



4,899 






Number of Suspensions and Revocations, Fiscal Years 1920 and 

1921. 







1920. 








1921. 


Date. 


Liquor. 


Other 
Causes. 


Total. 


Date. 


Liquor. 


Other 
Causes. 


Total. 


1919. 

December 


42 


80 


122 


1920. 

December 


103 


229 


332 


1920. 










1921. 










January . 




28 


84 


112 


January . 




56 


142 


198 


February 




12 


32 


44 


February 






40 


95 


135 


March 




9 


31 


40 


March 






75 


140 


215 


April 




31 


58 


89 


April 






94 


161 


255 


May 




46 


104 


150 


May . 






101 


165 


266 


June 




69 


208 


277 


June 






129 


319 


448 


July . 




100 


237 


337 


July . 






147 


367 


514 


August 




119 


231 


350 


August 






176 


375 


551 


September 




134 


290 


424 


September 




153 


476 


629 


October . 




132 


317 


449 


October . 




193 


584 


777 


November 




166 


384 


550 


November 




145 


434 


579 


Totals 


888 


2,056 


2,944 


Totals 




1,412 


3,487 


4,899 



144 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Number of Suspensions and Revocations according to Nature of 

Offences. 





1920. 


1921. 


Liquor cases 




888 


1,412 


Improper person (liquor) . 














- 


96 


Improper operating . 














323 


706 


Improper person 














449 


541 


Death cases .... 














411 


516 


Reckless and endangering lives 














406 


438 


Improper equipment 














- 


367 


Overspeeding twice . 














105 


272 


Overspeeding three times 














11 


23 


Taking car without authority . 














70 


172 


Going away after accident 














96 


124 


For several violations 














- 


14 


Miscellaneous offences 














185 


218 


Totals 


2,944 


4,899 



Comparative Statement of Registrations, Deaths, Accidents, 

Suspensions, etc. 



Year. 


T3 
CD 

u 

CD 

CO 

'8b 

to 
u 

m 
O 

-U 

< 


CD 

J 

u '** 

3 


Total Registra- 
tions. 


Number of Per- 
sons killed. 


Number of Per- 
sons injured. 


Ratio of Deaths 
to Registra- 
tions. 


Ratio of Injuries 
to Registra- 
tions. 


03 
03 

CO m 

o ft 

3 


u 

§.8 

o > 

3 


CD 

a 

CD 
ft 
CO 

3 

03 03 

M 

3 


1908 . 


18,066 


1,922 


19,988 


13 


486 


.00065 


.02431 


51 


44 


- 


1909 . 




23,971 


2,394 


26,365 


54 


989 


.00205 


.03751 


132 


68 


- 


1910 . 




31,360 


3,358 


34,718 


77 


963 


.00222 


.02774 


198 


90 


- 


1911 . 




38,907 


3,658 


42,565 


110 


1,248 


.00258 


.02932 


254 


95 


- 


1912 . 




50,132 


5,034 


55,166 


142 


1,962 


.00257 


.03557 


325 


190 


- 


1913 . 




62,660 


7,127 


69,787 


188 


2,923 


.00269 


.04188 


365 


198 


- 


1914 . 




77,246 


8,161 


85,407 


229 


4,010 


.00268 


.04695 


521 


231 


34 


1915 . 




102,633 


9,520 


112,153 


294 


6,197 


.00262 


.05525 


615 


303 


181 


1916 . 




136,809 


10,713 


147,522 


315 


9,131 


.00214 


.06190 


641 


514 


232 


1917 . 




174,274 


11,065 


185,339 


438 


7,282 


.00236 


.03929 


794 


717 


300 


1918 . 




193,497 


12,862 


206,359 


499 


8,598 


.00242 


.04166 


957 


811 


398 


1919 . 




247,183 


13,698 


260,881 


582 


16,287 


.00223 


.06243 


1,013 


856 


264 


1920 . 




304,631 


15,143 


319,774 


481 


21,182 


.00150 


.06624 


1,270 


1,172 


346 


1921 . 




360,732 


12,058 


372,790 


544 


11,487 


.00145 


.03081 


1,940 


1,119 


629 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 145 

The preceding statement shows that the number of motor 
vehicles has increased greatly since the period covered by the 
preceding report. On the other hand, the number of persons 
killed and the number of persons injured shows in the year 
1921 very little increase over the year 1918, the figures for 
persons killed being 544 as against 499 in 1918, and the num- 
ber of persons injured being 11,487 as against 8,598 in 1918. 
In the year 1919, however, the number of persons killed reached 
the number of 582, and in 1920 the number of persons injured 
reached the very alarming figure of 21,182. It is probable 
that the decrease noted has been due in part to better police 
protection and in no small measure to the activity of the 
registrar with regard to the suspension and revocation of 
licenses and rights. A year or two more of experience should 
show whether a further improvement will be realized. 

The statement also indicates the ratio of the number of 
persons killed and injured to the number of motor vehicles 
registered. These figures indicate a great proportional im- 
provement in the situation, the ratio of persons killed to the 
total number of motor vehicles registered having shrunk to 
.00145, the smallest figure since 1908, and the ratio of persons 
injured to the total number of motor vehicles registered having 
shrunk to .03081, the smallest figure since 1911. These tables 
indicate a very gratifying progress in dealing with a most 
dangerous situation during the past few years. 

The following table gives a classification of those killed and 
injured for the years 1914 to 1921, inclusive, and shows that 
the greater proportion of the reduction in injuries has been in 
the case of occupants of automobiles. While satisfactory 
progress has been made, the number of casualties remains 
extremely large. 



146 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 





1914. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


1921. 


Killed. 


















Pedestrians 


150 


188 


219 


260 


304 


379 


313 


339 


Occupants of automobiles 


56 


84 


68 


128 


136 


160 


114 


160 


Motor cycle riders 


18 


15 


15 


33 


28 


25 


28 


29 


Bicycle riders .... 


3 


3 


7 


11 


19 


17 


12 


14 


Occupants of carriages . 


2 


4 


5 


5 


4 


1 


1 


- 


Street car passengers 


- 


- 


1 


1 


8 


- 


10 


2 


Injured. 


















Pedestrians 


2,303 


3,110 


4,710 


4,001 


3,871 


5,719 


7,731 


6,524 


Occupants of automobiles 


879 


1,521 


2,363 


1,831 


3,560 


8,712 


11,055 


3,744 


Motor cycle riders 


337 


636 


895 


682 


504 


677 


870 


424 


Bicycle riders .... 


256 


497 


613 


524 


428 


622 


868 


594 


Occupants of carriages . 


217 


421 


521 


223 


192 


541 


344 


173 


Street car passengers 


18 


12 


29 


21 


43 


10 


218 


28 



Conference of Motor Vehicle Administrators. 

On Sept. 23, 1921, representatives having charge of motor 
vehicle laws and registrations, etc., in the following States 
met at the invitation of the Tax Commission of the State of 
New York, in New York, to consider the question of guiding 
future legislation and administration of the motor vehicle laws 
so as to procure uniformity and reciprocity: Connecticut, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsyl- 
vania and Rhode Island. 

As a result of this meeting a permanent organization was 
effected, and the organization was named Conference of Motor 
Vehicle Administrators. The first meeting of the conference 
was held at New Jersey on Nov. 18, 1921. It is hoped that 
as a result of this conference it may be possible to get better 
reciprocal relations with the New England and other eastern 
States, so that motorists, having complied with the law in their 
own State, may travel for pleasure into other States without 
having to go through difficulties with the police and motor 
vehicle authorities. The conference will probably give first 
consideration to the non-resident laws and also to the headlight 
regulations. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



147 



Investigations and Prosecutions by Inspectors. 
The following table furnishes a classification and summary 
of the work of the inspectors other than examination work, 
together with comparative figures for the preceding year: — 



1920. 



1921. 



Total reports received from inspectors 

Itemized as follows: 
Accidents, fatal .... 

Accidents, non-fatal .... 
Accidents, brief reports 
General reputation .... 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 

Prosecutions (all offences) 

Fines imposed 



1,522 



3,360 



480 


554 


316 


385 


230 


243 


223 


521 


273 


1,657 


1,522 


3,360 


76 


221 


$1,993 


$5,845 



Comparison of Abstracts of Court Records, Fiscal Years 1920 

and 1921. 



Number of courts that have forwarded abstracts 
Number of abstracts received .... 

Disposition of Cases. 
Persons guilty of operating unlawfully . . 
Persons not guilty of operating unlawfully 
Cases appealed to a higher court 
Complaints placed on file .... 

Complaints nol-prossed 

Probation 

Persons committed to imprisonment 
Defendants defaulted 




148 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Comparison of Abstracts of Court Records, Fiscal Years 1920 

and 1921 — Concluded. 



1920. 



1921. 



Offences. 

For overspeeding , 

For reckless operating 

For operating while intoxicated 

For using automobile without authority 

For endangering lives and safety of the public 

For failing to stop after causing injury 

For operating without a license 

For operating without carrying registration certificates . 
For operating an unregistered motor vehicle . 
For improper display or no register number . 
For refusing to stop when signaled by officer . 

For operating with unlighted lamps 

For failing to give signal when approaching intersecting way 

For operating with dazzling lights 

For operating within 8 feet of street car . 

For violating metropolitan park rules 

For miscellaneous offences 

For operating after license suspended or revoked . 

For larceny of motor vehicles ....... 

For manslaughter ......... 

Lenses not approved ........ 



6,593 


7,247 


192 


268 


992 


1,821 


164 


286 


419 


610 


156 


266 


2,321 


2,746 


1,347 


1,551 


406 


325 


536 


409 


589 


531 


1,549 


1,681 


3,163 


2,738 


148 


230 


318 


472 


423 


664 


2,612 


2,576 


43 


102 


53 


196 


34 


134 


- 


30 



Fines paid, as reported by State Auditor. 



1920. 



1921. 



For violations of the motor vehicle law 



$146,453 04 



,173 27 



Examinations for Licenses. 

Examinations of applicants for licenses to operate motor 
vehicles are now held in 57 cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth. At some of these points examinations are conducted 
daily, at other places weekly or fortnightly, depending on the 
season of the year, and as warranted by the number of ap- 
plicants. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



149 



The list of examination places follows 



Athol 

Attleboro 

Ayer 

Boston 

Bridge water 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Clinton 

Concord 

Fall River 

Falmouth 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Franklin 

Gardner 

Gloucester 

Great Barrington 

Greenfield 

Haverhill 



Hingham 

Holyoke 

flyannis 

Ipswich 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Mansfield 

Marlborough 

Middleborough 

Milford 

Nantucket 

New Bedford 

Newburyport 

Newton (West) 

North Adams 

Northampton 

North Brookfield 



Norwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Palmer 

Pittsfield 

Plymouth 

Provincetown 

Quincy 

Rockland 

Salem 

Southbridge 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Ware 

Wareham 

Webster 

Westfield 

Whitinsville 

Woburn 

Worcester 



The inspectors of this section of the Department during the 
fiscal year 1921 conducted 94,023 examinations of private 
operators and chauffeurs. 

The following statement gives some indication of the work 
of the examiners. It should be noted that the percentage of 
operators who failed was 26.6 per cent, while the percentage of 
chauffeurs failing was only 13.3 per cent. 



1919. 


1920. 


19,107 


39,845 


18,882 


37,444 


3,499 


4,510 


225 


2,401 


66 


403 


- 


83 


- 


45 



1921. 



Total examinations 
Chauffeurs examined 
Chauffeurs unfit . 
Operators examined 
Operators unfit 
"Competency," passed 
"Competency," unfit 



94,023 

46,506 

5,485 

46,136 

9,716 

137 

23 



150 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Head lighting. 

On May 26, 1921, an act passed by the Legislature, with an 
emergency preamble attached, required the use on all motor 
vehicle headlamps of a lens or other device approved by the 
registrar, designed to prevent glaring rays. Under the pro- 
visions of this act, 57 lenses and devices were submitted to a 
laboratory test under specifications formulated by this De- 
partment. These specifications were a great improvement over 
those under which devices were tested in other States having 
similar laws, and but 33 of the 57 devices submitted were 
successful in complying with the requirements. 

While the improvement in the specifications for laboratory 
test adopted by Massachusetts was in advance of any specifi- 
cations previously used, it was not expected that the results 
would be perfection, for the solution of this problem is still in 
its development stages. However, with State-wide publicity 
and education, through the distribution of proper literature and 
otherwise, the results attained were so much better than those 
attained in other States having similar laws that the com- 
mittee on motor vehicle lighting of the Illuminating Engineer- 
ing Society, which is composed of the greatest experts on this 
subject, has recently revised its specifications along lines simi- 
lar to those of the Massachusetts specifications with but a few 
minor improvements. 

Personnel of the Examining and Investigating Section. 

The personnel of this section has undergone some change, 
several inspectors having left the service, while thirty-three 
new men have been taken on. The section now consists of the 
chief and fifty-nine inspectors. 

Used-car Section. 
This section lists the sales of used cars and also keeps an 
index of cars that have been reported as stolen. The number 
of cars reported to this office as stolen in 1921, namely, 7,390, 
as the total, represents cars that were stolen in different parts 
of the country, such as, New York, Chicago, Pennsylvania, 
California, etc. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



151 



The following cars stolen outside of this State have been 
recovered through information furnished by this office: four 
cars stolen in Providence, R. I., two in New York, one in 
Brooklyn, one in Bronx, N. Y., one in Randolph, Vt., one in 
Manchester, N. H., one in Springfield, Vt., one in Pennsylvania, 
one in Newport and one in Montreal. 

The following cars stolen in Massachusetts have been re- 
covered outside of the State through information furnished this 
office: one in California, one in Florida, one in Albany, N. Y., 
one in Stratham, N. H., one in Philadelphia, one in Quebec, 
one in Montpelier, Vt., one in Providence, R. L, one in Essex 
Jet., Vt., one in Augusta, Me., one in Swanton, Vt., and one 
in Jacksonville, Fla. 

The following figures show somewhat the volume of work 
handled by the used-car section : — 



1921. 



Dealers: 
Total number making reports to this office 
Total number of first-class dealers reporting . 
Total number of second and third class dealers reporting 

Reports: 
Approximate number of individual reports received daily 
Approximate number of dealers' reports received daily . 

Motor vehicles stolen: 
Number of stolen motor vehicles reported to this office 

Number of cars stolen in Boston 

Number of cars recovered through this office . 

Engine numbers assigned: 

Engine numbers assigned to cars 

Letters authorizing replacing of engine numbers 



1,681 

1,033 

648 

175 
250 

7,390 
490 
339 

550 

50 



Registrations, Licenses, Fees. 
The registrations for 1921 showed an increase of about 20 
per cent over the preceding year, with the exception of a de- 
crease in the number of motor cycles registered, and the in- 
crease for five years is clearly shown in the following table : — 



152 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Passenger Cars, 


Commercial Vehicles and Motor Cycles. 




1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


1921. 


Per Cent 

Increase, 

Five 

Years. 


Passenger cars 
Commercial cars 
Motor cycles 


118,615 
18,194 
10,713 


145,801 
25,505 
10,956 


160,486 
33,011 
12,862 


205,372 
41,810 
13,698 


251,570 
52,968 
15,142 


305,471 
55,261 
12,048 


158 

205 

11 



The fees received for the year 1921, together with the number 
of vehicles registered in each classification and the number of 
licenses granted, etc., are shown in the following table: — 

Analysis of Receipts. 
Certificates of registration 
Passenger cars 
Commercial cars 
Trailers 
Motor cycles 
Motor cycle dealers 
Manufacturers or dealers 
Manufacturers or dealers, additional cars 
Repairers 

Licenses to operate: 

Operators 

Chauffeurs . 

Operators' renewals 

Chauffeurs' renewals 
Examinations 

Copies of certificates and licenses fur- 
nished 

Duplicate automobile number plates 
Duplicate motor cycle number plates 
State plates furnished 
Lens fees 

Total . 
Miscellaneous receipts 

Total fees 
Motor vehicle fees rebated (deducted) 

Net fees 





305,471 $2,827,854 50 




55,261 


788,439 50 




472 


7,419 50 




12,048 


56,637 00 




51 


510 00 




1,848 


45,700 00 


cars 


2,848 


18,384 50 


• 


280 


2,745 00 


36,420 at $2 00 


72,840 00 


41,021 at 2 00 


82,042 00 


211,349 at 2 00 


422,698 00 


91,729 at 2 00 


183,458 00 


93,501 at 2 00 


187,002 00 


17,337 at 50 


8,668 50 


7,552 at 75 


5,664 00 


197 at 50 


98 50 


790 at 10 


79 00 


53 


at 50 00 


2,650 00 



$4,712,890 00 
920 38 

$4,713,810 38 
69,185 55 

$4,644,624 83 



Court fines received by the Treasurer and Receiver-General 208,173 27 
Total receipts credited motor vehicle fees account . $4,852,798 10 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



153 



The cost of running the Registry of Motor Vehicles for the 
year 1921 was $542,411.09, which was 11.67 per cent of the 
net fees collected, as compared with 11.27 per cent for the 
year 1920. This cost, deducted from the receipts of the year, 
left available for legislative appropriation for highway work 
the sum of $4,310,387.01. 

The following table gives an analysis of the expenditures for 
running the Registry for the year 1921 : — 



Expenditures for the Fiscal Year 1921. 

Personal services: 

Regular pay roll $288,246 86 

Overtime . 11,698 37 



$299,945 23 



Supplies : 

Books, maps, etc 

Typewriter supplies (including carbon, 

$1,086) . . . 
Adding machine supplies 
Duplicator machine supplies 
Other machine supplies . 
Stationery .... 
Guide cards, folders, etc. 
Typewriter repairs . 
Multigraph repairs and supplies 
Other repairs .... 



$202 70 



1,617 33 


22 38 


168 56 


39 60 


9,969 59 


1,165 64 


373 96 


347 79 


273 98 



14,181 53 



Equipment : 

Typewriter machines ..... $849 50 

Duplicator machines 330 00 

Other machines 554 25 

Visible index system 3,285 09 

Furniture : 

Desks and chairs $427 84 

Filing cabinets 3,783 13 

Other articles as listed below: 

Electric fans 180 53 

Partitions, etc 559 90 



5,018 84 



4,951 40 



154 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Traveling expenses : 

Employees $25,429 81 

Automobiles (owned by employees) . . 34,566 45 

Other traveling expenses .... 2,082 72 

$62,078 98 

Other services and expenses : 

Expressage $279 68 

Postage 40,269 60 

Printing 26,243 31 

Telephone 343 99 

Premium on bonds of employees . . . 122 50 

Rent .... .... 3,466 34 

Special services (labor) 1,476 68 

Other services as listed below: 

Advertising \ . 476 96 

Badges for inspectors 170 00 

Cleaning and towels 651 87 

Commissions as justices of the peace . 320 00 

Headlight tests 2,120 00 

Headlight supplies 810 33 

Light and water fixtures .... 246 14 

Number plates 78,588 67 

Sign painting 183 96 

Uniforms for inspectors .... 360 00 

Sundries 105 08 

156,235 11 



Total $542,411 09 

The total amount appropriated or available for 1921 was 
$582,826.22. 

The following comparative statement for the years 1920 and 
1921 shows very plainly the increase of work as occasioned by 
increased registrations and licenses, etc. : — 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



155 



1920. 



1921. 



Passenger registrations . . 

Highest number plate assigned 
Commercial registrations 

Highest number plate assigned 
Motor cycle registrations 

Highest number plate assigned 
Motor cycle dealers' registrations . 
Manufacturers' or dealers' registrations 
Licenses to operate: 

Operators ...... 

Chauffeurs 

Operator renewals .... 

Cnauffeur renewals .... 

Total licenses 

Examinations ..... 

Copies of certificates and licenses issued 
Duplicate automobile number plates . 
Duplicate motor cycle number plates . 



Fees 

Miscellaneous receipts ' 



Total fees .... 

Motor vehicle fees rebated (deducted) 



Net fees 

Court fines received by the Treasurer and Receiver-General 

Total receipts credited Motor Vehicle Fees Account 



Personal services 
Expenses 



251,570 


305,471 


219,717 


259,655 


52,968 


55,261 


B49.572 


B55.150 


15,142 


12,048 


14,508 


11,393 


43 


51 


1,961 


1,848 


75,304 


36,420 


30,937 


41,021 


206,391 


211,349 


48,907 


91,729 


361,539 


380,519 


42,595 


93,501 


14,703 


17,337 


6,831 


7,552 


409 


197 


$3,853,484 25 


$4,712,890 00 


6,747 45 


920 38 


$3,860,231 70 


$4,713,810 38 


73,236 96 


69,185 55 


$3,786,994 74 


$4,644,624 83 


146,453 04 


208,173 27 


$3,933,448 78 


$4,852,798 10 


$249,375 83 


$299,945 23 


177,444 05 


242,465 86 



1 Interest amounting to $4,290.67 included in miscellaneous receipts for 1920. 

Aircraft. 

Acting under the provisions of sections 35 to 43 of chapter 
90 of the General Laws relating to aircraft, the registrar is- 
sued during the year ten airplane operator licenses, the fee in 
each case being $5. Six certificates of registration for aircraft 
were also issued, the fee in each case being $2, making the 
total fees received on account of aircraft and its operation $62. 



Recommendations of the Department for Legislation 

relating to the registry of motor vehicles. 
See pages 103, 104 of this report. 



DIVISION OF WATERWAYS AND 
PUBLIC LANDS 



DIVISION OF WATERWAYS AND PUBLIC 

LANDS. 



BOSTON HARBOR. 
The Commonwealth Flats at South Boston. 

Commonwealth Pier No. 5. 

Repairs have been necessary during the year, and an ex- 
amination has been made of the transformers feeding the con- 
verters which furnish power to the electric switches. These 
were found in good condition. 

Notice was received from the United States quarantine au- 
thorities that fenders or racks should be furnished to keep 
vessels at least 4 feet away from the side of the pier to prevent 
infected rats from escaping from vessels to the pier. Eight 
floating fenders 4 feet wide were bought from the William L. 
Miller Company at a cost of $1,600. These are sufficient to 
breast off four vessels and keep them at least 4 feet away from 
the pier. 

The platform and railings forming the lines used by the 
United States Immigration Inspectors were found filthy and in 
constant need of repair. When the pier was first built these 
railings were installed temporarily, with the intention of re- 
placing them later with railings made of pipe. On account of 
their insanitary condition the old railings were removed and 
twenty-six pipe line fences built and placed in position by 
employees at the pier. 

Because of trouble with the vacuum return system of the 
heating plant it was decided to investigate the matter of 
changing this system. The firm of Hollis French & Allen 
Hubbard, consulting engineers, was employed for this investi- 
gation and submitted a report recommending a change which 
would reduce the cost of operating the plant. The recom- 



160 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

mendation was adopted and the necessary work done under an 
agreement with the Walworth, English-Flett Company to make 
this change at cost plus 15 per cent, at a price not to exceed 
$2,400. This work was completed in November, 1921, at a 
cost of $1,937.89. The system as changed has proved satisfac- 
tory. 

In the fall of 1921 it was decided to move the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles from the State House to this pier. To ac- 
commodate the division properly, it was necessary to make a 
number of changes in the partitions and to install additional 
skylights. That this might be done as rapidly as possible 
agreements were made on Sept. 9, 1921, with the Holt-Fair- 
child Company to make the necessary changes at cost plus 5 
per cent, and on Oct. 5, 1921, with John H. Pray & Sons Com- 
pany to furnish and lay linoleum for the sum of $2.45 per 
square yard. 

The work under both these agreements was completed early 
in December, that of the Holt-Fairchild Company amounting 
to $67,815.93, and the John H. Pray & Sons Company to 
$7,183.10. 

In connection with this work it was necessary to move the 
offices of the superintendent to the opposite side of the pier 
and to use another room for the records of the Department. 
All of this work is included in the cost stated. 

Commonwealth Pier No. 6. 

At the request of the Boston Fish Market Corporation, the 
Division decided to repave, with granite blocks, certain brick 
paving opposite the buildings on the pier, and to leave to a 
later date the repaving of the central street and the archways 
under the buildings. On July 28, 1921, a contract was made 
with the B. E. Grant Company to repave the portion of the 
brick paving not repaired in 1918 and 1919, and to relay the 
stone blocks in the archway at the entrance to the pier and 
on the westerly side of the refrigerator building. This work 
was completed on Sept. 27, 1921, at a cost of $27,182.73. This 
leaves the repaving of the central street between the two main 
buildings and the archways under the buildings to be done at 
a later date. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 161 

Development of Land South of Summer Street. 

No sales have been made in this area during the year. 

The construction of Bullock Street from Fargo Street to 
Claflin Street, under contract with the B. E. Grant Company, 
dated July 19, 1920, was completed on Jan. 12, 1921, at an 
expense of $55,985.73. 

On Aug. 30, 1921, a contract was made with the B. E. Grant 
Company to construct a portion of Bullock Street from Claflin 
Street to Cypher Street and the northerly half of Cypher 
Street from C Street to D Street, to build a sewer with catch 
basins and pave the street with granite blocks. The work was 
practically completed at the end of the year at a cost of 
$24,968.75. This provides a continuous paved street from 
Fargo Street to South Boston, except for the crossing of 
Claflin Street which the city of Boston is expected to build in 
1922. 

Under its agreement with the Commonwealth the city has 
laid out D Street from Fargo Street to Claflin Street, and has 
completed the sewer and laid a water pipe preparatory to 
paving the street next year. 

South Bay. 

Late in 1920 the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road Company planned to extend the railroad yards at South 
Boston to take care of the increased number of passenger 
cars required. This larger area could be secured only by ex- 
tending the yard into South Bay. The matter was studied for 
some time by the engineers of the Division and by the United 
States Engineers. To both it appeared that the best use of 
the bay would be made by deepening the existing channel and 
filling the flats outside the channel. 

It was accordingly decided to recommend to the Legislature 
a change in the harbor line in this bay to allow a channel 160 
feet wide along the westerly side of the bay, with a turning 
basin at the upper end near the wharf of the Metropolitan 
Coal Company. By chapter 137 of the Acts of 1921 this 
change in the harbor line was made. 

License was later issued to the New York, New Haven & 



162 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Hartford Railroad Company to fill to the new harbor line to 
build the yard needed for the operation of its passenger equip- 
ment. Much of the filling is to be done upon flats belonging 
to the Commonwealth, and a large amount of tidewater dis- 
placement will result from the work. With the approval of the 
Governor and Council an agreement was made with the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company to pay the 
charges for Commonwealth tide lands and for tidewater dis- 
placement by deeding to the Commonwealth a tract of land 
bordering on the channel at the head of the bay. This was 
taken at the valuation fixed by the assessors of the city of 
Boston. The rate of charge for tidewater land of the Com- 
monwealth was fixed by the Governor and Council, and the 
rate for tidewater displacement was that charged under licenses 
previously granted for work in this vicinity. The filling au- 
thorized was begun at once and is now in progress. 

The Commonwealth Flats at East Boston. 

The report for 1920 referred to studies made during the 
year for the development of this property and to the need for 
a change in the harbor lines. A recommendation for the re- 
vision of these lines and their extension was made to the 
Legislature and subsequently embodied in chapter 111 of the 
Acts of 1921. 

Request was then made to have the United States pierhead 
and bulkhead lines re-established to conform to these new 
harbor lines. After consideration and hearing this revision 
was approved with two modifications. On the southerly side 
along the main harbor front the line was advanced to give a 
continuous straight line from East Boston to the southeasterly 
corner of Governor's Island, and the central dock was increased 
in width from 1,000 to 1,200 feet. A revision of the harbor 
line to conform to the United States line was later recom- 
mended to the Legislature. 

After appropriations were made for the extension of the 
work, a contract was made on May 11, 1921, with the Wil- 
liam L. Miller Company to build about 2,500 feet of bulkhead 
on the northerly edge of the area to be filled. The work was 
completed Aug. 26, 1921, at a cost of $56,157.08. This bulk- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 163 

head will prevent material used in filling from escaping to the 
flats of the city in the vicinity of Wood Island Park. 

A contract was made May 11, 1921, with the Atlantic, Gulf 
& Pacific Company to dredge and place upon the area en- 
closed by this bulkhead 1,100,000 cubic yards of material. 
The material is to be dredged, first, to complete the excavation 
of the berth of the first dock to be built upon the harbor front, 
and second, to begin the dredging of the central basin to be 
used later as a rehandling basin. During the year 791,722 
cubic yards were excavated at a cost of $260,793.23. Work 
under this contract will probably be completed early next 
year, but provision has been made for its extension if funds 
become available. 

Under this contract no material has been rehandled during 
the year, but dredging has been done to increase the berth and 
rehandling basin. A small amount of material has been 
dredged from other parts of the harbor and deposited within 
the area to be filled. This deposit will be continued until the 
new rehandling basins become available for the work. 

As the work of filling progressed, it became necessary to 
begin the building of the bulkhead on the westerly and south- 
erly sides of the central basin. On Sept. 14, 1921, a contract 
was made with the William L. Miller Company to build about 
1,900 feet of bulkhead on the westerly and southerly sides of 
the central basin. This work is now nearly completed. 

Railroad Connections with the Commonwealth Flats at 

East Boston. 

During the past few years studies have been made for the 
best location for a railroad connection from the Boston & Maine 
and Boston & Albany railroads to the Commonwealth flats at 
East Boston. The Commission on Waterways and Public 
Lands, in its report for 1919, recommended legislation to au- 
thorize the construction of rail connections between the State's 
property and the existing railroad system of the Common- 
wealth, and the taking, if necessary, of the location, tracks 
and trackage rights of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Rail- 
road Company. It also submitted to the Legislature a plan 
for constructing a railroad track through the Harbor View 



164 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

section of East Boston, connecting with the Boston & Maine 
and Boston & Albany Railroad tracks and extending easterly 
to the Commonwealth flats east of Jeffries Point. This mat- 
ter was considered by the Legislature of 1920, and as a result 
chapter 54 of the Resolves of 1920 provided for a special com- 
mission to consider the question of railroad connections be- 
tween the Commonwealth flats and the existing railroad 
systems. 

This Commission reported on March 8, 1921 (House No. 
1331 of 1921), recommending the construction of a track from 
the yard of the Boston & Albany Railroad at East Boston 
easterly to the Commonwealth flats, crossing the Boston, 
Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad at grade. 

After considering this report the Legislature passed chapter 
494 of the Acts of 1921, which authorized the Department of 
Public Works, Division of Waterways and Public Lands, to 
acquire a right of way and construct a railroad from the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, near Prescott Street, easterly, and 
crossing the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad at grade 
to the flats of the Commonwealth beyond Jeffries Point, with 
a provision that no trains on the new tracks shall be operated 
to cross the tracks of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Rail- 
road except between the hours of midnight and 6 o'clock in 
the morning. 

Under authority of this act negotiations have been in progress 
and surveys have been made. It is expected that early next 
year a taking will be made and the track constructed in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter 494 of the Acts of 1921. 

Battery Wharf Dredging. 

A contract was made on June 22, 1921, with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company to dredge to a depth of 
30 feet at mean low water an area in Boston Harbor between 
the harbor line in front of Battery Wharf and the docks on 
both sides of said wharf and the main ship channel, and to 
dredge to a depth of 25 feet at mean low water the dock on 
the northerly side of Battery Wharf. The contract prices for 
the work were: for dredging between the harbor line and the 
main ship channel, 55 cents per cubic yard, scow measure- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 165 

ment; for dredging in the dock, 50 cents per cubic yard, scow 
measurement; for removing boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 

This dredging was completed Aug. 30, 1921, at a cost of 
$13,859.35. Toward this cost a contribution of $4,000 was 
made by the Quincy Market Cold Storage and Warehouse 
Company. 

Mystic River. 

At the date of the report for 1920 the dredging of the chan- 
nel in Mystic River near Maiden bridge was completed except 
for a shoal about 30 feet wide over the pipe of the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company. This shoal was left at the request 
of the company that the covering over the pipe be undis- 
turbed until a new syphon could be built under the river to 
prevent any interference with the gas supply of the city. In 
August, 1921, the new pipe was in operation. On Oct. 14, 1921, 
the dredging of this shoal was completed by the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company at a cost of $1,200. 

The only obstructions remaining in this channel are certain 
cables of the Boston Elevated Railway Company projecting a 
little more than a foot above the bottom of the channel. 
Negotiations for the removal of these cables are in progress. 

Old Harbor Dredging. 

On Aug. 30, 1921, a contract was made with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company for dredging to a depth 
of 6 feet at mean low water the basin opposite the Mosquito 
Fleet Yacht Club House at Old Harbor. The contract prices 
for this work were: for dredging, 53 cents per cubic yard, scow 
measurement; for removing boulders, $15 per cubic yard. 
This work was completed Oct. 14, 1921, at a cost of $9,277.12. 

Winthrop Harbor Dredging. 
The work of dredging in this harbor under contract of Sept. 
10, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Com- 
pany was completed March 26, 1921, at a cost of $12,499.03. 
This work provided a basin between the United States govern- 
ment landing and the wharf of the Winthrop Yacht Club. 



166 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Cottage Park, Winthrop. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon the petition of the 
Cottage Park Yacht Club for redredging by the Common- 
wealth of the channel and basin at Cottage Park, originally 
dredged in 1906 and 1907. A contract was made on Aug. 30, 
1921, with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company 
for dredging to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water the channel 
and basin located southerly from the Cottage Park Yacht Club 
House. The contract prices for this work were: for dredging, 
51 cents per cubic yard, scow measurement; for removing 
boulders, $15 per cubic yard. 

This work was completed Oct. 17, 1921, at a cost of $11,851.38. 
Toward the cost a contribution of $1,000 was made by the 
Cottage Park Yacht Club. 

Wollaston Beach Dredging. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon the petition of the 
Wollaston Yacht Club for dredging by the Commonwealth of 
basins and approach channels to its club house. A contract 
was made on Aug. 1, 1921, with W. S. Rendle for dredging to 
a depth of 8 feet at mean low water the basin between the 
Wollaston and Squantum Yacht clubs, the inner end of the 
approach channel, and the basin on the easterly side of the 
approach channel, 250 feet long and 120 feet wide. The con- 
tract prices for this work were: for dredging, 42.5 cents per 
cubic yard, scow measurement; for removing boulders, $3 per 
cubic yard. 

Work under this contract was completed Nov. 26, 1921, at a 
cost of $15,045.35. Toward this cost a contribution of $1,000 
was made by the Wollaston Yacht Club and a contribution of 
$2,000 by the city of Quincy. 

Haywards Creek. 
The lease of May 12, 1920, by the Commonwealth to the 
Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation of certain land at Hay- 
wards Creek was assigned by the lessee on Feb. 15, 1921, to 
the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., and the assign- 
ment assented to by the Division as required by the terms of 
the lease. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 167 

Plans and specifications for a State pier, in progress at the 
time of the 1920 report, were completed, and on Aug. 6, 1921, 
proposals were received for the construction of this pier. Alter- 
nate bids were requested for a pier 500 feet long and 190 feet 
wide of pile or solid construction. When these proposals were 
received, certain suggestions were made by the Bethlehem 
Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., and a request for some changes 
in the plans to allow better facilities for the construction of the 
second dry dock proposed by the corporation. Because of this 
request and the general uncertainty of commercial conditions 
this project has been held in abeyance. 



168 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



RIVERS, HARBORS, TIDEWATERS AND FORESHORES OUT- 
SIDE OF BOSTON HARBOR. 

Section 11 of chapter 91 of the General Laws provides: — 

Outside of Boston Harbor, the division shall undertake such work for 
the improvement, development, maintenance and protection of rivers, 
harbors, tidewaters and foreshores as it deems reasonable and proper, 
and for this purpose shall have the same powers conferred upon it by 
section thirty-one. In selecting the places to do such work, the division 
shall consider the general public advantage of the proposed work, the 
local interest therein as manifested by municipal or other contributions 
therefor, the importance of the industrial or commercial and other in- 
terests to be especially served thereby, and any other material con- 
siderations affecting the feasibility, necessity or advantage of the pro- 
posed work or the expenditure therefor. No work authorized by this 
section shall be begun until after a public hearing has been held and 
a survey and an estimate of the cost has been made. 

The policy outlined in this section has been followed since 
the passage of chapter 481 of the Acts of 1909. During 1921 
an appropriation of $250,000 was available for this work. 

Petitions under this section have been filed during the 
year with the Division for surveys and improvements in the 
following localities: Cohasset Harbor, Cohasset; Gloucester 
Harbor, Gloucester; Herring River, Harwich; Hyannisport, 
Barnstable; Lake Anthony, Oak Bluffs; Little River, Glouces- 
ter; Mill River, Gloucester; Nobscusset Harbor, Dennis; 
Salters Point, Dartmouth; Sand Hills, Scituate; Scorton 
Creek, Sandwich; Wild Harbor, Falmouth; Witchmere Harbor, 
Harwich. 

Except for the holding of public hearings, and the making of 
surveys and estimates of cost in some instances, no conclusive 
action as to allotments has been taken during the year for 
carrying into effect improvements under petitions relating to 
Cohasset Harbor, Cohasset; Little River, Gloucester; Mill 
River, Gloucester; Salters Point, Dartmouth; Scorton Creek, 
Sandwich. 

For information relating to work accomplished in various 
harbors and rivers in the Commonwealth not specifically 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 169 

described in this report, attention is called to the annual re- 
ports of the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, to the 
annual reports of the Commission on Waterways and Public 
Lands for the years 1916 to 1919, inclusive, to the report of 
the Department of Public Works for 1920, and to the tables 
in the Appendix, which show localities, character of work, 
appropriations, contributions and expenditures by the Com- 
monwealth and certain appropriations and expenditures by the 
Federal government. 

Acushnet River. 

The work of dredging a channel in this river, under con- 
tract of Aug. 2, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company was completed Feb. 19, 1921, at a cost of 
$112,180.54. 

As a result of this dredging a channel has been provided 25 
feet deep at mean low water, 350 feet wide at the connection 
with the turning basin, narrowing to a width of 90 feet at a 
point about 500 feet north of the basin and continuing at this 
width a distance of 4,200 feet northerly. 

Amount expended during the year, $42,802.43. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $118,764.85. 

Ellisville Harbor, Plymouth. 

During the year the harbor at Ellisville maintained itself 
despite heavy storms in the early winter. Damage to the dike 
by one of these storms was repaired and the dike rebuilt by 
local labor interested, without expense to the Commonwealth. 

In February the need for a jetty on the north side of the 
channel and for riprap protection on the south side was brought 
to the attention of the Division. It was suggested that this 
work be done under the general direction of the Division by 
local labor, and that the expense of supervision be paid by 
residents interested. 

It appeared to the Division that an improvement so largely 
of local benefit might well be carried on in this manner. Plans 
for the work were accordingly submitted and an allotment made 
for material and labor. Under these conditions about 150 feet 
of timber crib work jetty, weighted with stone, was built on 



170 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

the north side of the channel and a small amount of riprap 
placed on the south side. 

Amount expended during the year, $925.01. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $16,069.83. 

Falmouth Heights Sea Walls. 

In March of this year an examination of the sea walls at 
Falmouth Heights showed the necessity for back rilling along 
the middle section of the sea wall built by the town. Under 
an arrangement with William H. Connor and Son, filling to the 
amount of 154.5 cubic yards was placed back of this wall at a 
price of $3.25 per cubic yard. The work was finished in May 
at a total cost of $502.13. 

Amount expended during the year, $559.89. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $50,566.83. 

Falmouth Inner Harbor. 

On May 13, 1921, a contract was made with William E. 
Burke to include the placing of about 50 tons of stone chips 
and 50 tons of stone riprap back of the timber fence on the 
easterly side of this harbor. The contract price for furnishing 
and placing this stone was $5.50 per ton. This work was 
completed Nov. 9, 1921, at a cost of $550.00. 

Complaints were received during the summer regarding the 
shoaling of the channel leading to this harbor. An investiga- 
tion showed that sand was being carried by the sea around 
the outer end of one of the jetties and deposited in the channel 
entrance. To prevent a continuance of this shoaling it was 
decided to extend the westerly jetty. 

Proposals were received on Sept. 2, 1921, and a contract 
was made Sept. 6, 1921, with the Bay State Dredging and 
Contracting Company to furnish and place about 4,000 tons of 
stone riprap and chips as an extension to the westerly jetty. 
The contract price for furnishing and placing this stone was 
$3.85 per ton. This work was completed Oct. 1, 1921, at a 
cost of $16,880.33. 

Amount expended during the year, $17,779.23. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $99,317.80. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 171 

Gloucester Harbor. 

Fresh Water Cove. — In July of this year the Division was 
asked to dredge the entrance channel and basin of this cove to 
provide accommodation for fishing boats using the harbor. A 
channel had been dredged by the Federal government to serve 
the United States Coast Guard station near the entrance to 
the cove and a basin provided opposite the launchways. The 
United States Coast Guard was interested in further dredging, 
and agreed to make a contribution of not more than $3,300 
toward the cost of the work. 

A contract was made on Aug. 15, 1921, with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company for dredging to a depth 
of 6 feet at mean low water a channel 100 feet wide on the 
bottom and 500 feet long, and a basin 125 feet wide on the 
bottom and 400 feet long, at the following contract prices: 
for dredging channel and basin and disposing of dredged ma- 
terial, 50 cents per cubic yard; for removing and disposing 
of all boulders, $12 per cubic yard. 

During the progress of the work, in response to requests for 
an extension of the dredging, the length of the basin was in- 
creased 100 feet. Work under this contract was completed 
Sept. 22, 1921, at a cost of $15,477.72. 

Gloucester Inner Harbor. — In connection with the work at 
Fresh Water Cove, the contractor agreed to dredge at the 
same contract prices to the depth of 18 feet at mean low water 
an area about 300 feet long and 70 feet wide lying between the 
18-foot contour and the harbor line opposite and northerly of 
the entrance to Vincent's Cove. The work was completed 
Sept. 22, 1921. 

Amount expended during year, $17,477.53. 

Total expenditure at Gloucester Harbor to Dec. 1, 1921, 
$107,244.74. 

Herring River, Harwich. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon a petition of the 
selectmen of Harwich for dredging and for the extension of 
jetties and bulkhead at this river. Proposals for dredging 
and riprap work were received, and on May 13, 1921, a con- 
tract with William E. Burke was made to include the dredging 



172 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

of the entrance channel 60 feet wide on the bottom, 1,000 feet 
long and 6 feet deep at mean low water, and the placing of 
about 500 tons of stone chips and 500 tons of stone riprap on 
the beach east of the entrance to the river. The contract 
prices are: for dredging channel, 63 cents per cubic yard; for 
removing boulders, $10 per cubic yard; for furnishing and 
placing riprap, $5.10 per ton. 

The work of dredging the entrance channel was completed 
Sept. 17, 1921, but the protective work has not been begun. It 
is expected that the riprap will be placed early in the coming 
spring. 

Amount expended during the year, $8,578.84. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $50,168.88. 

Hyannisport Harbor. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon a petition of the 
Hyannisport Village Improvement Association, and others, 
for dredging a channel in this harbor and for the removal of 
boulders back of the breakwater. A contract was made with 
William E. Burke on May 13, 1921, to include the dredging to 
the wharf in this harbor of a channel 700 feet long, 150 feet 
wide, and 6 feet deep at mean low water, and the removal of 
boulders from an area of about 16 acres lying northeast of the 
outer end of the breakwater. The contract prices are: for 
dredging, 63 cents per cubic yard; for removing boulders, $10 
per cubic yard; for removing boulders from area of 16 acres 
northeast of breakwater, $90 for each day the lighter is en- 
gaged in the work. 

The dredging in this harbor is now nearing completion, but 
the removal of the boulders from the area back of the break- 
water will not be begun until the coming spring. 

Amount expended during the year, $7,194.29. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $59,683.11. 

K at am a Bay, Edgartown. 

The work of excavating a channel through South Beach to 

connect Katama Bay with Edgartown Harbor was completed 

in March of this year at a cost of $2,168.46. Attempts had 

been made previously by local fishermen to dig a channel 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 173 

through this beach, but each time the opening had failed to 
maintain itself. The fishermen interested were convinced that 
with a larger expenditure a wider opening made under certain 
conditions of wind and tide would be permanent. The Di- 
vision agreed to have this work done, under the direction of its 
chief engineer, by local labor at a cost not to exceed $2,500. 
Toward this cost the town made a contribution of $300. 

On March 23 an opening was made through the beach. 
By the action of wind, tide and current the width of the open- 
ing was rapidly increased to 150 feet. Since the completion 
of the work the opening has reached a width of 500 feet. 

Amount expended during the year, $2,547.09. 

Total expenditure at Edgartown Harbor to Dec. 1, 1921, 
$2,826.62. 

Lake Anthony. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon the petition of the 
selectmen of Oak Bluffs for dredging in Lake Anthony. A 
contract was made on May 13, 1921, with William E. Burke 
to include dredging to a depth of 8 feet at mean low water of 
the entrance channel 100 feet wide and 750 feet long, and of 
the anchorage basin 800 feet long and 200 feet wide. The con- 
tract prices for this work are: for dredging, 43.3 cents per cubic 
yard; for removing boulders, $10 per cubic yard. Toward the 
cost of this work a contribution of $2,500 has been made by 
the town of Oak Bluffs. This work has not been begun but is 
expected to be completed during the coming winter. 
Amount expended during the year, $341.52 
Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $62,486.70. 

Menamsha Inlet. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon petitions of the 
selectmen of Chilmark, and others, for dredging Menamsha 
Inlet. In the following month certain repairs to the jetties at 
this harbor were requested by the superintendent of the Second 
Lighthouse District. 

A contract with William E. Burke was made on May 13, 
1921, to include the dredging of an anchorage basin 300 feet 
long, 150 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water, and 
the placing of about 200 tons of- stone riprap in strengthening 



174 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

and repairing the jetties, and the moving and resetting of the 
light on the east jetty. The contract prices for this work are: 
for dredging, 53 cents per cubic yard; for furnishing and 
placing stone riprap, $5.80 per ton; for lifting and resetting, 
not exceeding twelve large stones now in the jetties, including 
lifting and resetting the stones in which the lantern standard 
is fixed, the lump sum of $275. This work is not yet begun. 

Amount expended during the year, $605.92. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $64,625.61. 

New Bedford State Pier. 

The matter of leasing this pier for a term of years, under 
advisement at the date of the report for 1920, was further 
considered early in the year. On Dec. 4, 1920, advertisements 
were published in the New Bedford and Boston papers asking 
for proposals for the lease of the pier. 

These proposals were received Dec. 20, 1920. In the fol- 
lowing month the Division voted to lease the pier to the New 
Bedford Storage Warehouse Company. Before proceeding fur- 
ther in this matter notice of this intention was sent, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter 375 of the Acts of 
1920, to the mayor and aldermen of New Bedford. At their 
request a public hearing relative to this lease was held in 
New Bedford on Feb. 19, 1921. 

A lease under date of March 1, 1921, to the New Bedford 
Storage Warehouse Company for a term of five years was 
given under the provisions of chapter 375 of the Acts of 1920, 
and provided for the payment of rental as follows: $12,000 
for the first year; $13,500 for the second year; $15,000 for the 
third year; $16,500 for the fourth year; and $18,000 for the 
fifth year. Since this date the New Bedford Storage Ware- 
house Company has been in charge of the operation of the pier. 

This pier is capable of accommodating a vessel 600 feet 
long with a draft of 25 feet. It is provided with electric 
portable hoists for handling cargo, and is equipped to serve 
large ocean-going steamers. 

Upon the pier is a steel and concrete two-story building 300 
feet long and 105 feet wide provided with a freight elevator. 
In extension of this building two one-story wooden sheds have 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 175 

been built, in addition to a wooden shed for the use of immi- 
grants. These buildings give a storage area of approximately 
82,000 square feet. 

A channel 25 feet deep at mean low water leads from deep 
water in Buzzards Bay to this pier. Additional dredging to 
facilitate pier operations is now under consideration. 

Nobscusset Harbor. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon petition of the 
selectmen of Dennis for raising, widening and strengthening 
the breakwater at Nobscusset Point. A contract was made on 
Aug. 15, 1921, with Calvin G. Fletcher to include the furnish- 
ing and placing of about 800 tons of stone riprap to strengthen 
and repair about 100 feet of this breakwater. The contract 
price for furnishing and depositing this stone in the breakwater 
was $6 per ton. This work was completed Nov. 27, 1921, at 
a cost of $4,868.50. 

Amount expended during the year, $5,319.67. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $29,033.61. 

Oak Bluffs Sea Wall. 

In December the attention of the Division was called to the 
need for further protection at the sea wall on the easterly side 
of Sea View Avenue. A contract made May 13, 1921, with 
William E. Burke included the placing of about 500 tons of 
stone chips and 1,000 tons of stone riprap in front of this wall. 
The contract price for furnishing and placing this stone was 
$4.95 per ton. This work was completed Oct. 23, 1921, at a 
cost of $7,455.56, and comprised the protection of about 345 
feet at the southerly end of the wall. 

To furnish needed protection to the remaining 250 feet at 
the northerly end of the wall a contract was made on Nov. 18, 
1921, with the T. A. Scott Company, Inc., to place about 300 
tons of stone chips and 700 tons of stone riprap. The con- 
tract price for furnishing and placing this stone i $6.4 per 
ton. This work is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $7,109.26. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $29,151.37. 



176 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Scituate Sea Walls. 

By the provisions of chapter 585 of the Acts of 1920 the 
Division was authorized to make certain expenditures for the 
purpose of protecting the shores in the town of Scituate from 
damage by the sea. For this the Division may expend during 
1920, 1921, 1922, 1923 and 1924 a total sum not exceeding 
$250,000, of which one-third is to be contributed by the town 
of Scituate, one-third by the county of Plymouth, and one- 
third from State appropriations available for river and harbor 
improvement. The expenditure in any one year is limited to 
$100,000, except that an unexpended balance in any year may 
be used in the succeeding year. This act was not to become 
effective until accepted by the county commissioners and the 
town. 

At a special town meeting held Dec. 19, 1920, the town of 
Scituate voted to accept the provisions of the act, and appro- 
priated $25,000 for the work of shore protection during 1921. 
On Dec. 18, 1920, the county commissioners of Plymouth 
County voted to accept the act. 

At the beginning of the year conferences were held with the 
selectmen and the county commissioners, at which reports of 
the engineering department upon examination of shore con- 
ditions in Scituate were discussed. It was decided to spend 
the money available in 1921 in the localities where the need 
of protective work seemed most urgent. In accordance with 
this policy, work during the year has been carried on at the 
Glades, at Humarock Beach and at Third Cliff. 

Glades. — On Sept. 14, 1921, a contract was made with 
Arthur J. Mitchell for building about 253 feet of concrete sea 
wall, about 300 feet of concrete footings under an existing con- 
crete wall, and the excavating of about 7,500 cubic yards of 
coarse gravel or shingle from an area westerly of the proposed 
wall and depositing the same on the beach. The contract 
prices for the work are: for furnishing materials and construct- 
ing the new wall, $11 for each cubic yard of concrete measured 
in place in the completed work; for furnishing materials and 
constructing the concrete footings, $4 for each linear foot of 
completed footing; for excavating, placing and grading of all 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 177 

material, $1 for each cubic yard of material measured in place 
before excavating. This work is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $6,360.94. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $6,412.57. 

Humarock Beach. — On May 27, 1921, a contract was made 
with John Williams & Co. for the construction of about 2,300 
linear feet of concrete sea wall with return walls, three sets of 
concrete steps, forty-six concrete jetties and one concrete apron 
at this beach. The contract prices for this work were: for 
furnishing materials and constructing the main wall and steps, 
$12.50 per cubic yard of concrete measured in the completed 
work; for furnishing materials and constructing each spur 
jetty, $150 for each complete jetty 25 feet in length; for fur- 
nishing material and constructing concrete slab and shutoff 
walls at the end of Marshfield Avenue, $400 for the com- 
pleted work. The cost of the apron for the protection of 
Marshfield Avenue, amounting to $400, was paid by the town. 
This work was completed Oct. 7, 1921, at a cost of $55,564.75. 

Amount expended during the year, $56,724.56. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $56,960.63. 

Third Cliff. — On March 11, 1921, a contract was made 
with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company for 
placing riprap near the southerly end of this cliff at a price of 
$5.80 per ton. At the completion of this work on April 27, 
1921, stone riprap to the amount of 3,700 tons had been placed 
to protect the southerly end of the cliff, at a cost of $21,527.98. 

Amount expended during the year, $22,148.51. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $22,148.51. 

Taunton River, Somerset. 

In September request was received from the New England 
Oil Refining Company for dredging by the Commonwealth of 
an area in Taunton River between Slades Ferry bridge and 
the Brightman Street bridge. Toward the cost of this work 
the company agreed to make a contribution of $12,500. 

A contract was made on Nov. 3, 1921, with the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company for dredging to the depth 
of 30 feet at mean low water an area in Taunton River lying 
between the Slades Ferry bridge and the Brightman Street 



178 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

bridge. The contract prices for this work are: for dredging, 
72 cents per cubic yard; for removing boulders, $22 per cubic 
yard. This work is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $2,512.46. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $4,635.40. 

West Bay, Barnstable. 

The work of dredging a channel in this bay, under contract 
of July 1, 1920, with the Bay State Dredging and Contracting 
Company, was completed Jan. 13, 1921, at a cost of $27,661.14. 

An examination made in March of this year showed the 
urgent need of protecting the bank east of the entrance chan- 
nel and the crest of the beach west of the west jetty. A con- 
tract made on May 13, 1921, with William E. Burke included 
the placing of about 500 tons of stone chips on the bank east 
of the entrance channel, and about 200 tons of stone chips and 
500 tons of stone riprap on the crest of the beach west of the 
west jetty. The contract price for furnishing and placing 
this stone is $4.97 per ton. This work is now in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $2,539.57. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $84,067.95. 

Wild Harbor, Falmouth. 

On May 13, 1921, a contract was made with William E. 
Burke to include the dredging of an entrance channel to the 
inner basin at this harbor. The specifications provided that 
the channel should be dredged 900 feet long, varying in width 
from 100 feet at the outer end to 60 feet on the inner portions 
and 6 feet deep at mean low water. The contract prices 
were: for dredging, 46.5 cents per cubic yard; for removing 
and disposing of boulders, $10 per cubic yard. This work was 
completed July 29, 1921, at a cost of $6,442.05. 

While the dredging was in progress it was found that the 
stone work in the jetty at this harbor had settled to such a 
degree that in heavy weather sand was being driven over the 
jetty into the entrance channel. Under an agreement with 
William H. Connor & Son Company a concrete top was built 
upon this jetty at a cost of $1,105. 

Hearing was held on July 15, 1921, upon a petition of Ed- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 179 

ward N. Dahlborg for an extension of this jetty. On Aug. 
15, 1921, a contract was made with Calvin G. Fletcher to in- 
clude the placing of about 2,000 tons of stone riprap and chips 
as an extension of this breakwater. The contract price for 
furnishing the stone and building this extension was $6 per 
ton. This work was completed Nov. 27, 1921, at a cost of 
$12,228.88. 

Amount expended during the year, $17,638.45. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $33,253.17. 

Witchmere Harbor. 

On Feb. 10, 1921, hearing was held upon a petition of the 
selectmen of Harwich for dredging and extension of jetties at 
this harbor. A contract made on May 13, 1921, with William 
E. Burke included dredging in the entrance channel to this 
harbor to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water for a width of 
60 feet on the bottom and a length of 850 feet. The contract 
prices for this work were: for dredging, 63 cents per cubic 
yard; for removing boulders, $10 per cubic yard. This work 
was completed Oct. 23, 1921, at a cost of $4,978.26. 

An examination of the west jetty at this harbor, made in 
October, showed that sand was working through the spaces 
between the stones and causing shoals in the channel. To 
protect the channel and repair the breakwater a contract was 
made on Nov. 18, 1921, with T. A. Scott Company, Inc., to 
include the placing of about 300 tons of stone chips along the 
west side of the westerly jetty. The contract price for furnish- 
ing and placing this stone is $6.95 per ton. This work is now 
in progress. 

Amount expended during the year, $5,195.69. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $34,965.10. 



180 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. 
Great Ponds. 

Jurisdiction over great ponds belonging to the Common- 
wealth, these ponds containing in their natural state 10 or 
more acres of land, was conferred upon the former Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners by chapter 318 of the Acts 
of 1888, and further authority given that Board by chapter 
379 of the Acts of 1904, to sell and convey or lease any of the 
islands owned by the State in the great ponds, subject to the 
approval of the Governor and Council. 

During the year the Division has made examinations, held 
conferences or taken other proceedings relative to Baddacook 
Pond, Groton; Farm Pond, Oak Bluffs; Furnace Pond, Pem- 
broke; Island Creek Pond, Duxbury; Lake Quinsigamond, 
Worcester; Manchaug Lake, Douglas and Sutton; North 
Pond, Hopkinton and Milford; Martins Pond, North Reading; 
Oldham Pond, Pembroke; Phillipston Pond, Phillipston; Pon- 
toosuc Lake, Pittsfield; Stockbridge Bowl, Stockbridge; Wen- 
ham Pond, Carver; Whalom Lake, Lunenburg. 

A list of the lakes and ponds of the State with areas of 10 
or more acres, given by counties, is printed in the report of 
the Commission on Waterways and Public Lands on "Water 
Resources of Massachusetts, 1918." 

By chapter 12 of the Resolves of 1921 the Division of Water- 
ways, and Public Lands was directed to make surveys, ex- 
aminations and maps of the great ponds in the Commonwealth 
except those under the jurisdiction of any State board, com- 
mission or department other than the Department of Public 
Works, and was authorized to expend $5,000 during the years 
1921 and 1922 for this purpose. In accordance with this 
resolve a survey has been made of the following ponds : — 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



181 



Name. 



Location. 



Area 

(Acres). 



Maximum 
Depth 

(Feet). 



Coonemessett Pond 

Crooked Pond 

Deep Pond 

Jenkins Pond 

Long Pond 

Mares Pond 

Round Pond, east of Coonemessett Pond 

Round Pond 

Shallow Pond .*.... 

Spectacle Pond 

Beck Pond 

Gravelly Pond 

Round Pond 

Lake Mahkeenac 

Coys Pond 



Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Falmouth 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Stockbridge 

Wen ham . 



157.52 
34.09 
26.69 
86.68 

149.65 
29.11 
11.46 
18.06 
11.51 
19.25 
35.8 
45.4 
36.8 

371.7 
24.5 



43.4 
43.0 
29.1 
44.2 
76.4 
56.3 

8.8 
25.2 

2.9 
15.5 
13.5 
56.2 
24.3 
43.9 

7.5 



Many ponds or reservoirs in the Commonwealth have been 
created by the building of dams across streams which are in 
some instances the outlets of great ponds. Often it is difficult 
to decide whether a great pond exists in these localities or 
whether the ponds are wholly artificial. 



Conserving and Equalizing the Flow of Water in Rivers 

and Streams. 

By chapter 87 of the Resolves of 1918 a special commission 
on the water resources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
was created, including in its membership the chairman of the 
Commission on Waterways and Public Lands, to investigate 
the water resources of the Commonwealth, and their report 
was printed as Senate Document No. 298 of 1919. 

By chapter 359, Acts of 1909, chapter 564, Acts of 1912, and 
chapter 84, Resolves of 1917, co-operation was established be- 
tween the Commonwealth and the Water Resources Branch of 
the United States Geological Survey, whereby data relating to 
the gauging of streams within the Commonwealth, and other 
work of a similar character carried on by the said survey, 



182 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

have been obtained for use by the Division, said data being 
available for other departments of the Commonwealth. 

Toward the cost of this work the Commonwealth has paid 
during the year, $2,999.96. 

Province Lands. 

The territory belonging to the Commonwealth, known as 
the Province Lands in Provincetown, comprises about 3,390 
acres lying northerly and westerly of a line described in chap- 
ter 470 of the Acts of 1893. By the terms of this act the 
Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners was*given general 
care and supervision of this area. 

Reclamation work on these lands has been carried on under 
the direction of a superintendent since 1894. To prevent the 
movement of the sand the barren dunes are first covered 
with brush or planted with beach grass. The grass is pulled 
in bunches about 2 inches thick for transplanting in rows about 
4 feet apart and 6 inches deep, and so transplanted lives be- 
tween four and five years. This work is followed and rein- 
forced by the transplanting of trees and shrubs. 

During the year work on these lands has been continued in 
accordance with these methods. Twenty acres of sand dunes 
have been covered with brush, and 8 acres of bayberry trans- 
planted. In addition, 65,000 pines were transplanted. 

The sum of $178.70 has been paid into the State treas- 
ury during the year, being the amount received from licenses 
issued to various parties to cultivate and pick cranberries on 
the bogs, and to mow meadowlands. 

Amount expended during the year, $3,998.59. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $89,128.56. 

Massachusetts Atlas Sheets and Town Boundary Atlases. 
Under authority of chapter 57, Resolves of 1890, chapter 
42, Resolves of 1891, chapter 360, Acts of 1900, and chapter 
69, Resolves of 1915, 3,650 atlas sheets of the map of the 
Commonwealth and 3 town boundary atlases have been sold 
during the year ending Nov. 30, 1921, for which $530.20 was 
received and forwarded to the Treasurer and Receiver-General. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 183 

No atlases were delivered during the year under the author- 
ity of chapter 360, Acts of 1900, as amended by chapter 484, 
Acts of 1909. 

Re-establishment of Certain Triangulation Stations. 

By chapter 223 of the General Acts of 1915, the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners was authorized to make such 
surveys and do such other work as may be required by any 
order of the Land Court; to re-establish and permanently 
mark certain stations previously established in connection with 
the topographical survey of the Commonwealth and the town 
boundary survey, which have been lost or destroyed; and to 
obtain the geographical position of such new points and sta- 
tions as may be required from time to time by the court. 
The Board was allowed to expend not exceeding $1,000 from 
the sum of $1,500 which may be annually paid out of the 
State treasury. 

During the year the location of the following triangulation 
stations was determined and permanently marked on the 
ground, and their geographical positions furnished to the Land 
Court: 7 stations in Worcester; 9 stations in Sandwich; 7 
stations in Nantucket; 7 stations in Framingham; and 3 
stations in Essex. 

Further details of these stations are in the files of the Di- 
vision. 

Amount expended during the year, $956.55. 

Total expenditure to Dec. 1, 1921, $6,664.74. 

Special Reports to the Legislature. 

Traffic Tunnel to connect Boston and East Boston. — Report 
made March, 1921, under the provisions of chapter 73 of the 
Resolves of 1920, by the Division of Waterways and Public 
Lands of the Department of Public Works and the transit de- 
partment of the city of Boston. 

Gloucester Marshes and Beaches. — House No. 356 of 1921. 
Report made Jan. 7, 1921, under provisions of chapter 34 of 
the Resolves of 1920, by a special commission consisting of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, the county commissioners of 



184 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Essex County, and the mayor of Gloucester, relative to the 
taking over for public uses of certain marshes and beaches in 
the city of Gloucester. 

Bridge over Lobster Cove, Gloucester. — House No. 357 of 1921. 
Report made Jan. 12, 1921, under the provisions of chapter 52 
of the Resolves of 1920, by the Department of Public Works, 
relative to the necessity and cost of the construction of a new 
bridge. 

Boston & Maine Railroad Claim against the Commonwealth. — 
House No. 358 of 1921. Report made Jan. 1, 1921, under the 
provisions of chapter 37 of the Resolves of 1920, by the At- 
torney-General and the Division of Waterways and Public 
Lands of the Department of Public Works, relative to a cer- 
tain claim of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Mystic, Maiden and Neponset Rivers and Chelsea Creek. — 
House No. 689 of 1921. Report made Jan. 12, 1921, under 
the provisions of chapter 17 of the Resolves of 1919, by the 
Department of Public Works, Division of Waterways and 
Public Lands, relative to improvement of these rivers. 

Boston and Chelsea Transportation Facilities. — House No. 
1157 of 1921. Report made Feb. 1, 1921, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 71 of the Resolves of 1920, by the Division 
of Waterways and Public Lands of the Department of Public 
Works, relative to transportation facilities. 

Commonwealth Pier No. 5, South Boston. — House No. 1261 
of 1921. Report made Feb. 23, 1921, by the Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands of the Department of Public 
Works, in response to a communication from the committee on 
rules of the House of Representatives, relative to operation of 
this pier. 

Rail Connections at East Boston. — House No. 1331 of 1921. 
Report made March 8, 1921, under the provisions of chapter 
54 of the Resolves of 1920, by a special commission consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public W r orks, the chairman of the 
Department of Public Utilities, and the Supervisor of Ad- 
ministration, relative to the best route for making rail con- 
nections between the Commonwealth flats at East Boston and 
the Boston & Albany and Boston & Maine railroads. 

Dry Dock Claims. — House No. 1173 of 1921. Report made 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 185 

Feb. 4, 1921, by the Department of Public Works, Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands, under the provisions of section 
35 of chapter 30 of the General Laws, relative to claims grow- 
ing out of the construction by the Commonwealth of the dry 
dock at South Boston. 



Licenses granted during the Year. 

Nos. 

97. Petition of the Nantucket Yacht Club for license to build a bulk- 

head and fill solid in Nantucket Harbor, Nantucket. Granted 
Dec. 3, 1920. 

98. Petition of Jessie B. Dawes for license to build a timber bulkhead 

and fill solid at Houghs Neck, Quincy. Granted Dec. 9, 1920. 

99. Petition of the Pilgrim Tercentenary Commission for approval of 

plans for building structures, filling solid, and other work in Plym- 
outh Harbor, Plymouth, as authorized by chapter 107 of the 
Resolves of 1916, and chapter 187 of the Special Acts of 1919. 
Granted Dec. 14, 1920. 

100. Petition of the town of Barnstable, by a committee of said town, 

for license to build a public wharf, on piles, and a landing, in 
Lewis Bay, Barnstable. Granted Dec. 20, 1920. 

101. Petition of Laura C. Foster for license to build a sea wall and fill 

solid in Smiths Cove in Gloucester Harbor, Gloucester. Granted 
Dec. 20, 1920. 

102. Petition of Alfred Therriault for license to build a sea wall and fill 

solid in Salem Harbor at Palmers Point, Salem. Granted Dec. 
24, 1920. 

103. Petition of the Haverhill Electric Company for license to lay and 

maintain a submarine cable in and under Merrimack River, 
Haverhill. Granted Dec. 27, 1920. 

104. Petition of the Palmer and Parker Company for license to build a 

pile and timber bulkhead on the south channel of Mystic River, 
Boston. Granted Dec. 27, 1920. 

105. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to build and maintain a concrete sewer and to fill solid 
in Boston Harbor at South Boston. Granted Jan. 10, 1921. 

106. Petition of The Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston 

for license to lay a cable in Charles River at and near the draw 
opening of Warren bridge, Boston. Granted Jan. 10, 1921. 

107. Petition of the Brown Betty Amusement Company, Incorporated, 

for license to build a wall and fill solid in Oldham Pond, Pem- 
broke. Granted Jan. 10, 1921. 

108. Petition of Jonathan Warner for license to build and maintain a 

pile pier in Vineyard Sound at Squaw Island, in Barnstable. 
Granted Feb. 4, 1921. 



186 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

109. Petition of the Fairhaven Mills for license to build and maintain a 

pile and timber bulkhead and fill solid in Acushnet River adjoining 
Coggeshall Street bridge, in New Bedford. Granted Feb. 18, 1921. 

110. Petition of the city of Boston for license to drive additional piles in 

Boston Harbor at the east wharf at Long Island, in Boston. 
Granted Feb. 25, 1921. 

111. Petition of the city of New Bedford for license to build and maintain 

a pile and timber bulkhead and riprap slope, and to fill solid, in 
Acushnet River at Pope's Island, in Xew Bedford. Granted 
Feb. 25, 1921. 

112. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to repair and 

strengthen its railroad bridge Xo. 50 on its Portland Division, 
over Merrimack River, in Xewburyport and Salisbury. Granted 
March 25, 1921. 

113. Petition of the county commissioners of Barnstable County for 

license to make repairs to Bass River bridge across Bass River in 
Yarmouth and Dennis. Granted April 8, 1921. 

114. Petition of the Western Union Telegraph Company of Xew York for 

license to lay two submarine cables in Fort Point Channel at 
Summer Street bridge and across the draw way in said bridge, in 
Boston. Granted April 8, 1921. 

115. Petition of the Western Union Telegraph Company of Xew York 

for license to lay a submarine cable in Beverly Harbor westerly 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad bridge, in Beverly and Salem. 
Granted April 8, 1921. 

116. Petition of Batchelder Brothers for license to drive piles in front of 

its bulkhead on Roxbury Canal, in Boston. Granted April 15, 
1921. 

117. Petition of Anna T. Fitzgerald for license to construct and maintain 

a building supported bj^ concrete piers in and over Lake Quin- 
sigamond at Lake Avenue, in Worcester. Granted April 15, 1921. 

118. Petition of the town of Chatham for license to build a pile pier and 

float-stage in Little Mill Pond, in Chatham. Granted April 15, 
1921. 

119. Petition of the Monomoy Weir and Fish Compam^, Incorporated, 

for license to build a pile pier in Mill Pond, in Chatham. Granted 
April 15, 1921. 

120. Petition of the town of Gosnold for license to build a pile wharf and 

wall, to fill solid, and to dredge in Cuttyhunk Harbor at Cutty- 
hunk Island, in Gosnold. Granted April 22, 1921. 

121. Petition of the trustees of the Universal Tide Power Company for 

license to build a dam, tide-gates, pile and timber bulkheads, to 
excavate a basin, and to dredge and deposit material, in Saugus 
River, Saugus. Granted April 29, 1921. 

122. Petition of J. Philip Hartt for license to build a wharf and float- 

stages in Sippican Harbor, in Marion. Granted April 29, 1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 187 

Nos. 

123. Petition of the William Stopford Company, Incorporated, for license 

to build a pile pier on Danvers River, in Beverly. Granted April 
29, 1921. 

124. Petition of the Fairhaven Mills for license to maintain an intake 

well and connecting pipe in Acushnet River, New Bedford. 
Granted May 6, 1921. 

125. Petition of the Holyoke Water Power Company for license to build 

an addition to its power house on Connecticut River, in Holyoke. 
Granted May 6, 1921. 

126. Petition of the New England Tire and Rubber Company for license 

to construct a pumping well and suction pipe in Connecticut 
River, in Holyoke. Granted May 6, 1921. 

127. Petition of the Locke Coal Company for license to construct a 

wharf, repair a bulkhead and dredge in Maiden River, in Maiden. 
Granted May 6, 1921. 

128. Petition of the city of Boston for license to reconstruct Chelsea 

bridge on the south channel of Mystic River, in Boston. Granted 
May 20, 1921. 

129. Petition of Harold E. Davis for license to lay a water pipe in Annis- 

quam River, in Gloucester. Granted May 23, 1921. 

130. Petition of William H. Dolan for license to erect and maintain two 

wires across Whalom Lake, in Lunenburg. Granted May 27, 
1921. 

131. Petition of the West End Street Railway Company, by the Boston 

Elevated Railway Company, its attorney, for license to build a 
pile and timber bulkhead and fill solid in Chelsea Creek adjoining 
Eagle Street, East Boston. Granted June 3, 1921. 

132. Petition of the West End Street Railway Company, by the Boston 

Elevated Railway Company, attorney, for license to maintain 
and continue filling along the northerly side of Mystic River, in 
Boston. Granted June 3, 1921. 

133. Petition of the West End Street Railway Company, by the Boston 

Elevated Railway Company, attorney, for license to maintain 
and continue filling in tidewater westerly of Neponset River, 
south of Neponset Avenue, in Boston. Granted June 3, 1921. 

134. Petition of the Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company for 

license to remove a dam and other structures from North River, 
in Salem. Granted June 13, 1921. 

135. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Company, lessee, for license to maintain its submarine 
signal cable at its bridge across Charles River, in Boston and 
Cambridge. Granted June 15, 1921. 

136. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Companj^, lessee, for license to maintain its submarine 
cable on its Grand Junction Branch across Broad Canal, in Cam- 
bridge. Granted June 15, 1921. 



188 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

137. Petition of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Company 

for license to replace an old submarine cable with a new submarine 
cable under Saugus River, in Lynn and Revere. Granted June 
15, 1921. 

138. Petition of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Com- 

pany for license to maintain three cables under Fort Point Channel 
and under the draw way in its drawbridge, in Boston. Granted 
June 15, 1921. 

139. Petition of the Simpson's Patent Dry Dock Company for license to 

build a temporary cofferdam and to dredge in Boston Harbor at 
East Boston. Granted June 15, 1921. 

140. Petition of the county commissioners of Essex County for approval 

of plans for two bridges in and over Good Harbor Creek in a pro- 
posed new highway back of Good Harbor Beach in Gloucester, as 
authorized by chapter 218 of the General Acts of 1919. Approval 
signed June 12, 1921. 

141. Petition of Harry H. Wiggin for license to build structures, fill solid 

and to dredge in Mystic River, in Boston. Granted June 15, 
1921. 

142. Petition of the Naumkeag Steam Cotton Company for license to 

build a wall and bulkhead and to fill solid in Palmer's Cove, in 
Salem. Granted June 15, 1921. 

143. Petition of the A. E. Little Company for license to build a wall in 

Forest River, in Marblehead. Granted June 15, 1921. 

144. Petition of Manuel Furtado for license to build a pile wharf in 

Provincetown Harbor, in Provincetown. Granted June 15, 1921. 

145. Petition of William H. Hand, Jr., for license to build and maintain 

launching ways in Acushnet River, in Fairhaven. Granted July 
1, 1921. 

146. Petition of the city of New Bedford by its water department for 

license to lay and maintain a 2-inch water pipe in Acushnet River 
and under the draw way in the New Bedford and Fairhaven 
bridge, in New Bedford. Granted July 1, 1921. 

147. Petition of Harold Brooks for license to build and maintain structures, 

to fill solid and dredge a basin in Weymouth Fore River, in Wey- 
mouth. Granted July 1, 1921. 

148. Petition of the Metropolitan District Commission for license to 

reconstruct a portion of a highway bridge over Saugus River, in 
Lynn. Granted July 2, 1921. 

149. Petition of the New Bedford Gas and Edison Light Company for 

license to construct four dolphins and a platform in Acushnet 
River, New Bedford. Granted July 8, 1921. 

150. Petition of the town of Saugus to build a temporary structure at the 

bridge across Saugus River at Lincoln Avenue, Saugus. Granted 
July 8, 1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 189 

Nos. 

151. Petition of the city of Boston for license to drive piles at its north- 

west wharf at Long Island in Boston Harbor. Granted July 14, 
1921. 

152. Petition of the city of Boston for license to repair and extend the 

north pier at the Boston landing of the North Ferry in Boston 
Harbor. Granted July 14, 1921. 

153. Petition of the county commissioners of Essex County for approval 

of plans for reconstructing the bridge over Plum Island River, 
Newbury, as authorized by chapter 482 of the Acts of 1921. 
Granted July 28, 1921. 

154. Petition of N. E. Lowell for license to build a bulkhead and fill 

solid in Nantucket Harbor, Nantucket. Granted July 28, 1921. 

155. Petition of the county commissioners of Middlesex County for 

license to construct an embankment and culvert in and over 
Martins Pond, in North Reading. Granted July 28, 1921. 

156. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to build structures, drive piles, and to dredge in Rox- 
bury Canal, in Boston. Granted Aug. 8, 1921. 

157. Petition of the City Fuel Company for license to build a pile 

wharf on Weymouth Fore River, in Quincy. Granted Aug. 17, 
1921. 

158. Petition of Edward H. R. Green for license to build a pile wharf 

and platform in Buzzards Bay at Round Hill, Dartmouth. 
Granted Aug. 17, 1921. 

159. Petition of the Western Union Telegraph Company of New York 

for license to lay and maintain a submarine cable in Beverly 
Harbor, in Beverly and Salem. Granted Aug. 17, 1921. 

160. Petition of the Lewis Wharf Company for license to build a sea wall 

and fill solid at its wharf property in Boston Harbor, Boston. 
Granted Sept. 16, 1921. 

161. Petition of the Haverhill Electric Company for license to build a 

sea wall, drive piles and fill solid in Merrimack River at Haver- 
hill. Granted Sept. 21, 1921. 

162. Petition of the New England Confectionery Company for license to 

drive piles in Fort Point Channel, in Boston. Granted Sept. 23, 
1921. 

163. Petition of the Point of Pines Trust, Alden A. Mills, trustee, for 

license to dredge and fill solid in Pines River, Revere and Saugus. 
Granted Sept. 23, 1921. 

164. Petition of the city of Boston for license to lay and maintain a sub- 

marine cable in Fort Point Channel at Dover Street bridge, in 
Boston. Granted Oct. 3, 1921. 

165. Petition of Sydney E. Hutchinson for license to build pile pier and 

float in Massachusetts Bay at Beverly Farms, in Beverly. Granted 
Oct. 3, 1921. 



190 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Nos. 

166. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to repair and 

strengthen its bridge No. 10 on Mill Creek, in Chelsea. Granted 
Oct. 3, 1921. 

167. Petition of John S. Coy for license to build and maintain a pile and 

timber bulkhead and fill solid in Acushnet River at Popes Island, 
in New Bedford. Granted Oct, 3, 1921. 

168. Petition of the Boston Consolidated Gas Company for license to 

construct and maintain a pile and timber bulkhead and fill solid 
in Roxbury Canal, in Boston. Granted Oct. 17, 1921. 

169. Petition of the Glendale Coal Company for license to extend its 

wharf on piles, and to dredge the south channel of Mystic River, 
in Boston. Granted Oct. 17, 1921. 

170. Petition of the General Electric Company for license to build a pile 

wharf and a bulkhead, to fill solid and dredge in Maiden River, 
Everett. Granted Oct. 24, 1921. 

171. Petition of the Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company for 

license to lay and maintain four submarine cables in Merrimack 
River, Haverhill. Granted Oct. 24, 1921. 

172. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to surface the beach at Old Harbor, in South Boston. 
Granted Oct. 24, 1921. 

173. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to strengthen the upstream pier of Dover Street bridge 
on Fort Point Channel, Boston. Granted Oct. 24, 1921. 

174. Petition of the Russell Sim Tanning Company for license to build a 

sea wall, a bulkhead, and to fill solid in Salem Harbor, Salem. 
Granted Oct. 25, 1921. 
174a. Petition of David M. Little for license to build a pile and timber 
bulkhead and to fill solid in Salem Harbor, Salem. Granted Oct. 
25, 1921. 

175. Petition of the city of Boston, by its commissioner of public works, 

for license to dump snow and ice into tidewater in Boston. 
Granted Oct. 28, 1921. 

176. Petition of the board of trustees of the Boston Elevated Railway 

Company for license to dump snow and ice into tidewaters of 
Boston, Cambridge and Chelsea. Granted Oct. 28, 1921. 

177. Petition of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston for 

license to build a bulkhead and pile wharf, to fill solid and dredge 
in Weymouth Fore River, Weymouth. Granted Oct. 28, 1921. 

178. Petition of Edward H. R. Green for license to build a pile wharf and 

drive piles in Buzzards Baj^ at Round Hill, in Dartmouth. Granted 
Oct. 28, 1921. 

179. Petition of Amey D. S. Peters for license to build a wharf in Mat- 

tapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett. Granted Oct. 28, 1921. 

180. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to maintain a 

7-conductor submarine cable in Saugus River at bridge No. 15, 
in Lynn and Saugus. Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 191 

Nos. 

181. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to maintain 

submerged pipe lines and cables in Charles and Millers rivers, in 
Boston and Cambridge. Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 

182. Petition of the Boston & Maine Railroad for license to maintain 

two 7-conductor submarine cables in Mystic River at drawbridge 
No. 7, in Somerville, and one 7-conductor submarine cable at 
drawbridge No. 8 in Mystic River, in Somerville and Medford. 
Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 

183. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Company, lessee, to maintain three telegraph cables and 
one telephone cable in Mystic River at bridge G. J. 4.15, in Somer- 
ville and Everett. Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 

184. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Company, lessee, to maintain an electric light cable and 
a Western Union cable in Chelsea Creek at bridge G. J. 7.43, in 
Boston and Chelsea. Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 

185. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Company, lessee, for license to maintain a submarine 
cable in Broad Canal at bridge G. J. 1.77, in Cambridge. Granted 
Nov. 4, 1921. 

186. Petition of the Boston & Albany Railroad, the New York Central 

Railroad Company, lessee, for license to maintain a submarine 
cable in Charles River at bridge G. J. 0.33, in Boston and Cam- 
bridge. Granted Nov. 4, 1921. 

187. Petition of the county commissioners of Essex County for approval 

of plans for the construction of three culverts in a proposed new 
highway back of Long Beach, Rockport, as authorized by chapter 
218 of the General Acts of 1919, as amended by chapter 157 of 
the Acts of 1920. Approval signed Nov. 8, 1921. 

188. Petition of the Salisbury Beach Associates for license to build and 

maintain jetties, and a dam at the mouth of the "Pool" in Mer- 
rimack River, Salisbury. Granted Nov. 16, 1921. 

189. Petition of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Com- 

pany for license to fill solid in South Bay, Boston. Granted Nov. 
16, 1921. 

Permits. 
During the year 52 permits for miscellaneous purposes were 
granted. The Division also approved 63 permits granted by 
cities and towns for the construction and maintenance of fish 
weirs in tide water. 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR LEGIS- 
LATION RELATING TO THE DIVISION OF WATERWAYS 
AND PUBLIC LANDS. 

See pages 105 and 106 of this report. 



192 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



APPENDIX. 



Receipts during Fiscal Year 1921. 
Port of Boston Fund. 



Rent under leases and permits . 
Use of Commonwealth Pier 5 
Use of Commonwealth Pier 1 
Use of Maverick Street property 
Use of Hayward's Creek property 
Inspection of dumping, Boston Harbor 
Dumping at receiving basins 

License charges 

Sundries 

Sale of land and property . 



Waterways Fund. 
Inspection of dumping, outside Boston Harbor 
License charges 

Use of State Pier, New Bedford 



$91,947 21 




100,965 72 




11,503 94 




720 00 




446 00 




2,495 38 




8,067 23 




7,704 70 




677 64 




127,786 79 






$352,314 61 




$114 86 




8,130 00 






8,244 86 






10,988 43 



Income, Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 

Use of Province Lands $178 70 

Sale of Massachusetts Atlas sheets . . . 530 20 

Certified copies of documents .... 49 00 



Interest on bank accounts 



757 90 
863 57 



$373,169 37 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



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K 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



195 



Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for Improve- 
ment of Small Harbors and Channels within Boston Harbor, 
under the direction of the department of public works, 
Division of Waterways and Public Lands, and its Predeces- 
sors, from 1893 to 1921, inclusive. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Cottage Park Channel, Win- 
throp. 

Dorchester, easterly shore, Bos- 
ton. 

Harbor View, Boston 


Dredging . 


$19,255 71 


$1,000 00 


$20,234 37 


Dredging . 




70,363 60 


- 


70,171 31 


Dredging . 




10,146 00 


- 


146 00 


Hingham Harbor 


Dredging . 




13,180 69 


3,000 00 


16,180 69 


Houghs Neck Channel, Quincy 


Dredging . 




26,989 58 


3,500 00 


28,489 58 


Island End River, Everett 


Survey 




264 10 


- 


264 10 


Jeffries Point Channel 


Dredging . 




12,961 90 


- 


2,961 90 


Mystic River (near Lawrence 

and Wiggin's Wharf) . 
Neponset River 


Dredging . 
Dredging . 




5,927 70 
44,732 53 


- 


5,927 70 
44,731 79 


Old Harbor Cove 


Dredging . 




9,724 47 


- 


9,724 47 


Orient Heights Channel . 


Dredging . 




45,679 15 


- 


45,323 67 


Pleasant Park Yacht Club 

Channel. 
Point Shirley .... 


Dredging . 
Dredging . 




3,154 92 
3,713 37 


- 


3,154 92 
3,713 37 


Shirley Gut, Boston and Win- 

throp. 
South Boston, southerly shore . 


Dredging . 




1,906 20 


- 


1,906 20 


Dredging . 




129,542 12 


- 


129,542 08 


Stony Beach, Hull . 


Sea wall 




11,794 85 


- 


11,522 02 


Weir River, Hull 


Dredging . 




105,963 51 


25,000 00 


130,963 51 


Wessagussett Channel 


Dredging . 




815 20 


- 


815 20 


Weymouth Fore River 


Dredging . 




47,192 02 


- 


32,267 53 


Winthrop Harbor Channels 


Dredging . 




41,038 16 


700 00 


39,783 58 


Wollaston Channel . 


Dredging . 




45,236 31 


3,000 00 


47,814 92 








$649,582 15 


$36,200 00 


$645,638 91 



196 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor Work 
from Dec. 1, 1920, to Nov. 30, 1921, under Chapter 481, Acts 
of 1909, and Chapter 91 of the General Laws. 



Location. 


Character of Work. 


Contribu- 
tions. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Acushnet River .... 


Dredging .... 


- 


$42,802 43 


Brant Rock, Marshfield 


Jetties 


- 


499 88 


East Bay, Osterville .... 


Dredging .... 


- 


3,297 23 


Edgartown Harbor .... 
Ellisville Harbor .... 


Extending channel through 

beach. 
Breakwater .... 


$300 00 


2,620 97 
925 01 


Falmouth Inner Harbor . 


Extending jetties . 


- 


17,779 23 


Glades, North Scituate 


Sea wall 


- 


6,360 94 


Gloucester Harbor .... 


Dredging .... 


- 


17,477 53 


Great Ponds 


Survey 


- 


2,499 99 


Herring River 


Dredging and riprap 


- 


8*578 84 


Humarock Beach, Scituate 


Sea wall 


19,735 37 


56,724 56 


Hyannisport 


Removing boulders and dredg- 


- 


7,194 29 


Improvement of rivers and harbors . 


ing. 
General expenses . 


- 


3,448 46 


Lake Anthony, Oak Bluffs 


Dredging .... 


- 


341 52 


Menamsha Inlet .... 


Riprap 


- 


605 92 


Nobscusset Harbor, Dennis 


Breakwater repairs 


i 


5,319 67 


Oak Bluffs 


Survey 


- 


184 02 


Pamet River 


Survey 


- 


163 15 


Plymouth Harbor .... 


Survey 


- 


2,198 60 


Scituate Harbor .... 


Dredging .... 


- 


13 00 


Taunton River ..... 


Dredging .... 


- 


2,674 89 


Third Cliff, Scituate 


Protective work 


7,313 37 


22,148 51 


Vineyard Haven Harbor . 


Survey 


- 


354 45 


West Bay, Osterville 


Dredging 


- 


22,117 91 


Wild Harbor 


Jetty extension 


- 


17,638 45 


Witchmere Harbor .... 


Dredging .... 


- 


5,195 69 




$27,348 74 


$249,165 14 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



197 



Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures from 1893 to 
1921, inclusive, for River and Harbor Work, under the Di- 
rection of the Department of Public Works, Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands, and its Predecessors, to Nov. 
30, 1921 (excepting Boston Harbor). 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Acushnet River 


Inspection . 


$118,764 85 


- 


$118,764 85 


Aliens Harbor, Harwich . 


Surveys 


302 00 


- 


302 00 


Aliens Pond, Dartmouth . 


Survey 


195 95 


- 


195 95 


Annisquam River, Gloucester . 

Apponagansett Harbor and 

River, Dartmouth. 
Barnstable Harbor . 


Dredging, removing 
ledges and riprap. 

Survey, dredging and 
stone breakwater. 

Survey and dredging 


107,630 63 
56,159 59 
17,392 18 


$1,500 00 


107,260 75 
55,786 05 
18,554 64 


Bass River, Beverly 


Dredging . 


25,539 81 


55,535 75 


81,075 56 


Bass River, Dennis and Yar- 
mouth. 
Brant Rock, Marshfield . 


Jetties, dredging and 

survey. 
Sea wall 


88,089 74 
4,703 81 


2,500 00 


89,104 74 
4,703 81 


Bucks Creek, Chatham . 
Buzzards Bay, Falmouth 


Jetties, survey and 
dredging. 

Survey 


29,739 06 
166 11 


1,500 00 


31,067 74 
166 11 


Cataumet Harbor and Sque- 
teague Pond, Bourne and Fal- 
mouth. 

Centerville River, Barnstable . 


Dredging . 
Dredging . 


26,520 68 
6,103 22 


7,350 00 
1,500 00 


33,726 77 
7,603 22 


Cohasset Harbor, Cohasset and 

Scituate. 
Concord River, Billerica . 


Breakwater and dredg- 
ing. 
Removing boulders . 


36,172 55 
1,514 59 


20,691 88 
150 00 


56,864 43 
1,664 59 


Connecticut River . 
Connecticut River . 


Investigation of navi- 
gation and surveys. 
Improvement 


10,637 04 
103 63 


- 


6,970 99 
103 63 


Connecticut River, Agawam . 


Protective work 


20,396 09 


- 


18,814 42 


Connecticut River, Chicopee . 


Survey, wall and rip- 


25,149 02 


640 00 


25,789 02 


Connecticut River, Hadley 
Connecticut River, Hatfield 


rap. 
Protective work and 

diversion wall. 
Dikes and riprap 


100,443 65 
14,751 82 


500 00 
1,000 00 


97,740 941 
14,952 57 


Connecticut River, Holyoke . 
Connecticut River, Holyoke . 

Connecticut River, Northamp- 
ton. 

Connecticut River, South Had- 
ley. 

Connecticut River, West Spring- 
field. 

Conservation of waters 


Marking and lighting 
old piers. 

Dredging and protec- 
tive work. 

Protective work 


677 70 

18,815 78 

1,525 80 


415 00 


677 70 
4,230 78 
1,524 20 


Wall .... 


6,406 36 


1,000 00 


7,379 58 


Protective work 


12,002 78 


- 


11,919 27 2 


Investigation 


40,999 96 


- 


38,766 22 


Cotuit Harbor, Barnstable 


Dredging and survey 


60,248 02 


2,000 00 


59,219 91 


Cuttyhunk Harbor, Gosnold . 


Jetties and dredging . 


61,828 25 


9,000 00 


70,754 18 


Deacons Pond Harbor, Fal- 
mouth. 3 


- - 


- 


- 


- 



1 From 1888, inclusive. 



2 From 1891, inclusive. 



3 See Falmouth Inner Harbor. 



198 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Appeopeiations, etc. — Continued. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Duxbury Bay and Harbor 


Dredging . 


$27,798 79 


- 


$27,798 79 


East Bay, Osterville 
Edgartown Harbor . 
Ellis vi lie Harbor 


Jetties, dredging and 
removing scows. 

Survey and making 
channel 

Dredging . 


61,258 79 

2,526 62 

16,069 83 


$10,000 00 
300 00 


70,924 23 

2,826 62 

16,069 83 


Essex County beaches 


Survey 


1,000 00 


- 


1,000 00 


Essex River .... 


Dredging . 


5,000 00 


- 


5,000 001 


Fall River Harbor . 


Improvement . 


350,290 54 


- 


1,130 18 


Falmouth Heights, Falmouth . 


Sea wall 


37,566 83 


13,000 00 


50,566 83 


Falmouth Inner Harbor . 
Gloucester Harbor, Gloucester . 
Great Ponds .... 


Dredging, jetties and 
wall. 

Dredging and remov- 
ing ledges. 

Survey 


85,317 80 

99,744 74 

2,500 00 


14,000 00 
7,500 00 


99,317 80 

107,244 74 

2,499 99 


Green Harbor, Marshfield 
Gun Rock Point, Hull . 


Jetties, dredging and 

survey. 
Breakwater 


90,804 54 
48,096 11 


10,000 00 


76,466 85 
58,096 11 


Harbor Cove, Gloucester . 


Survey and dredging 


18,528 73 


866 00 


19,394 73 


Herring Creek, Scituate . 


Survey 


253 76 


- 


253 76 


Herring River, Harwich . 


Jetties and dredging . 


48,313 18 


2,500 00 


50,168 88 


Herring River, Wellfleet . 


Dikes and ditches 


11,832 74 


10,000 00 


21,800 73 


Housatonic River, Sheffield 


Survey 


2,011 29 


- 


2,011 29 


Hull 


Sea wall and survey . 


25,258 32 


8,882 06 


34,140 38 


Humarock Beach, Scituate 


Survey 


37,639 19 


19,735 37 


56,960 63 


Hyannisport, Barnstable . 

Improvement of rivers and har- 
bors. 
Ipswich River, Ipswich 

Kings Beach, Swampscott 


Survey and break- 
water. 
General expenses 

Jetty, wall, riprap and 
dredging. 

Removal of obstruc- 
tion. 

Jetties and dredging . 


57,183 11 

15,068 52 

47,325 48 

166 41 


2,500 00 
1,000 00 


59,683 11 

15,068 52 

48,318 92 

166 41 


Lake Anthony, Oak Bluffs 


63,695 74 


2,000 00 


62,486 70 


Lake Quannapowitt, Wakefield 


Investigation 


1,004 21 


- 


345 32 


Lewis Bay, Barnstable 


Survey and dredging 


29,211 64 


- 


28,963 21 


Little Harbor, Marblehead 


Dredging . 


8,666 16 


2,500 00 


11,166 16 


Little River, Gloucester . 


Survey 


862 93 


- 


862 93 


Lobster Cove, Gloucester 


Dredging . 


33,047 26 


1,500 00 


34,547 26 


Lynn Harbor, anchorage basin 


Survey and dredging 


121,789 29 


5,200 00 


121,588 07 


Lynn Harbor and Saugus River 


Dredging and filling . 


90,942 35 


37,500 00 


128,442 35 


Manchester Harbor . 

Menamsha Inlet, Chilmark and 
Gay Head. 


Survey, jetties and 

dredging. 
Jetties, dredging and 

sea wall. 


68,100 67 
64,029 26 


43,500 00 
700 00 


109,078 51 
64,625 61 



1 Expended by United States government. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



199 



Appropriations, etc. — Continued. 



Locality. 



Character of Work. 



Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 



Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 



Merrimack River 

Mill River, Gloucester 

Mitchells River, Chatham 

Nantucket Harbor . 

New Bedford Harbor 

New Bedford Harbor 

New Bedford State Pier . 

New Bedford State Pier . 

Newburyport Harbor 

Nobscusset Harbor, Dennis 

North River, Marshfield . 

North River, Salem 

Oak Bluffs . 

Oak Bluffs . 

Onset Bay, Wareham 

Orleans 

Pamet River, Truro 

Paskamansett River, Dart- 
mouth. 
Penikese Island, Gosnold 

Plum Island River, Newbury 

and Newburyport. 
Plymouth Harbor 

Popponesset Bay 

Powow River s 

Province Lands, Provincetown 

Provincetown Harbor 

Quansett Harbor, Orleans 

Quicks Hole, Gosnold 

Red Brook Harbor, Bourne 

Revere 

Rock Harbor, Orleans 

Rockport Harbor 

Salem Harbor .... 

Salt Pond River, Eastham 

Salters Point, Dartmouth 



Investigation and sur- 
vey. 
Survey and dredging 

Survey 

Dredging . 

Dredging . 

Pier, shed and dredg- 
ing. 
Improvement 

Operation and main- 
tenance. 
Survey 

Breakwater, dredging 

and riprap. 
Surveys and removing 

rocks. 
Survey 

Removing rocks 

Sea wall 

Survey and dredgin 

Survey 

Survey, dredging and 

repairing jetties. 
Dredging and jetty 

Pile wharf and survey 

Survey 

Dredging . 

Dredging . 

Dredging channel and 

riprapping wall. 
Reclamation 

Survey 

Survey 

Survey 

Removing pier . 

Stone breakwater 

Dredging . 

Dredging and remov 

ing rocks. 
Survey 

Survey 

Breakwater 



$1,308 50 

24,632 86 

322 96 

42,058 63 

1,409 76 

371,899 77 

73,461 00 

53,274 33 

115 97 

37,194 16 

6,858 75 

704 52 

632 45 

26,651 37 

14,295 89 

104 18 

191,259 95 

5,227 68 

5,300 00 

983 31 

178,413 59 

46,252 33 

502 94 

92,000 00 

1,217 78 

195 88 

500 00 

275 00 

60,407 09 

12,108 25 

14,429 32 

3,050 05 

210 11 

13,509 59 



$300 00 



1,000 00 



13,446 74 > 



1,200 00 
1,800 00 



2,500 00 
1,000 00 

1,200 00 



71,794 55 



400 00 



1,500 00 



$1,208 50 
24,899 59 

322 96 

42,779 78 

1,409 76 

385,346 51 

73,436 38 

47,765 09 

115 97 

29,033 61 

8,658 75 

704 52 

594 95 
29,151 37 
15,295 89 

104 18 

192,459 95 

5,227 68 

5,192 95 

983 31 
223,705 87 2 
46,252 33 

502 94 

89,128 56 

1,217 78 

194 50 

275 00 

60,397 93 

12,492 71 

13,749 02 

1,050 05 

210 11 
15,009 59 



1 Paid by surety company. 

2 $57,000 expanded under direction of United States government. 



200 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Appropriations, etc. — Concluded. 



Locality. 


Character of Work. 


Total 
Appropria- 
tion. 


Contribu- 
tions by 
Munici- 
pality or 
Others. 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture. 


Sandwich Harbor 

Saugus River, Lynn and Saugus 


Dredging channel, rip- 
rap and jetties. 
Survey and dredging 


$80,579 84 
19,206 64 


$2,000 00 


$80,579 84 
20,845 17 


Scituate 


Sea walls and riprap . 


84,912 19 


14,548 37 


98,355 69 


Scituate Harbor 


Dredging . 


96,676 92 


8,300 00 


104,976 92 


Scorton Harbor, Sandwich 


Jetty and dredging 


19,426 39 


500 00 


17,774 34 


Sesuit Harbor, Dennis 


Jetty .... 


28,067 85 


1,500 00 


24,555 10 


Sippican Harbor, Marion . 


Survey 


7 17 


- 


7 17 


Smith's Cove, Gloucester 


Survey and dredging 


5,163 07 


- 


5,163 02 


South River, Salem . 


Dredging . 


10,523 65 


3,000 00 


13,462 66 


South Watuppa Pond, Fall 

River. 
Stage Harbor, Chatham . 


Fenders and excava- 
tion. 
Dikes and survey 


203 42 
10,803 01 


_ 


203 42 
10,803 01 


Taunton River 


Survey and dredging 


8,207 88 


- 


4,635 40 


Taunton-Brockton waterway . 


Investigation 


5,388 46 


- 


5,278 18 


Taunton River-Boston Harbor 

Canal. 
Taunton River-Massachusetts 

Bay Canal. 
Vineyard Haven Harbor . 


Survey 
Survey 
Repairing sea wall 


10,000 00 

11,786 71 

9,564 51 


2,380 50 


9,932 75 
11,786 71 
11,945 01 


Vineyard Haven Harbor, Tis- 

bury. 
Waquoit Bay, Falmouth . 

Wareham River 


Breakwater and dredg- 
ing. 

Breakwater wall and 
bulkhead. 

Survey and dredging 


45,089 48 
29,583 79 
37,349 27 


1,000 00 
2,000 00 
5,000 00 


45,518 25 
31,285 40 
42,349 27 


Warrens Cove, Plymouth 


Sea wall 


14,468 97 


9,713 98 


24,481 22 


Watch Hill, Chatham 


Survey and riprap 


15,020 47 


- 


14,968 75 


Wellfleet Harbor 


Survey and dredging 


16,867 22 


1,500 00 


17,600 29 


West Bay, Barnstable and Oster- 
ville. 

West Falmouth Harbor, Fal- 
mouth. 

West Harwich .... 


Jetties and dredging . 


74,105 32 


10,000 00 


84,067 95 


Dredging . 
Survey 


25,655 31 
9 00 


- 


24,386 18 
9 00 


Westfield River 


Survey 


6,296 90 


- 


6,037 29 


Wild Harbor, Falmouth . 


Jetty and dredging 


33,310 04 


5,000 00 


33,253 17 


Winthrop shore 

Witchmere Harbor, Harwich . 


Sea walls and protec- 
tive work. 
Jetties and dredging . 


17,058 48 
34,107 80 


3,000 00 
1,000 00 


20,058 48 
34,965 10 


Woods Hole, Great Harbor, Fal- 
mouth. 
Wrecks 

Yarmouthport Harbor 


Dredging . 

Removal from tide- 
water. 
Survey 


5,468 86 
65,943 49 
88,977 37 


1,500 00 
7,000 00 


6,968 86 

7,131 91 

95,977 37 




$4,656,482 95 


$473,550 20 


$4,592,941 04 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



201 



Federal Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Federal appropriations and expenditures for improvement of 
rivers and harbors in Massachusetts from the establishment of 
the government to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1921, as shown in the following tables, furnished by the Chief of 
Engineers, U. S. A.: — 



Table No. 1. — Localities at Present under Improvement. 

[Compiled from the annual report of the Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., for the fiscal year ending 

June 30, 1921.] 



Locality. 



Expenditures. 



Appropriations. 



Newburyport Harbor 

Merrimack River 

Sandy Bay, Cape Ann, harbor of refuge 

Gloucester Harbor 

Beverly Harbor 

Salem Harbor 

Lynn Harbor 

Mystic River (upper portion) 3 .... 
Mystic River (below mouth of Island End River) 3 

Maiden River 

Boston Harbor 4 

Dorchester Bay and Neponset River . 

Weymouth Fore River 

Weymouth Back River 

Plymouth Harbor 

Provincetown Harbor 

Pollock Rip Shoals, Nantucket Sound 
Nantucket Harbor of Refuge .... 
New Bedford and Fairhaven harbors 

Taunton River 

Fall River Harbor 

Totals 



$494 

404 

1,941 

538 

49 

71 

471 



064 44 
401 95 
478 00 
183 00 
125 00 
368 66 
000 77 



305,515 23 



149 

12,604 

95 

500 

26 

363 

348 

656 

576 

769 

203 : 

397, 



891 55 
864 31 
008 00 
974 77 
500 00 
868 69 
062 72 
863 16 
361 88 
310 00 
782 79 
388 33 



$20,968,013 25 



$494,100 00 
414,466 72 » 

1,950,000 00 

542,083 00 

110,625 00 

71,368 66 2 

476,837 00 

336,050 00 

149,950 00 

12,675,827 58 

95,233 00 

573,750 00 

27,000 00 

391,959 80 

362,162 97 

815,000 00 

591,473 50 

769,610 00 

210,189 18 

412,411 49 



121,470,097 90 



1 Of original amount appropriated, $900 was carried to the surplus fund of the treasury from 
previous project. 

2 Of original amount appropriated, $1,131.34 was carried to the surplus fund of the treasury. 

3 Now consolidated as one improvement. 

4 Including Chelsea Creek. 



202 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Table No. 2. — Localities in which Work is not novj in Progress. 

[Compiled from data furnished by the United States Treasury Department and the Chief of 

Engineers, U. S. A.] 



Locality. 



Expenditures. 


Appropriations. 


$20,150 34 


$20,150 41 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


5,312 54 


9,800 00 


12,171 36 


13,732 79 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


37,000 00 


37,000 00 


7 57 


1,500 00 


25,000 00 


25,000 00 


30,000 00 


30,000 00 


38,316 58 


39,000 00 


221,787 75 


221,267 07 


5,617 91 


7,500 00 


8,940 09 


10,000 00 


18,000 00 


18,000 00 


23,985 57 


24,300 00 


833 42 


1,900 00 


7,000 00 


7,000 00 


50,940 72 


51,000 00 


91,229 25 


91,232 57 


104,590 98 


104,680 00 


37,577 41 


37,577 41 


55,387 35 


60,000 00 


95,997 30 


96,236 00 


11,365 57 


16,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


9,000 00 


9,000 00 


343,599 92 


344,000 00 


$1,269,311 63 


$1,291,376 25 



Bass River . 
Buzzards Bay Harbor . 
Canapitset Channel 
Chatham Harbor 
Cohasset Harbor . 
Duxbury Harbor . 
East Dennis Breakwater 
Edgartown Harbor 
Essex River . 
Hingham Harbor . 
Hyannis Harbor . 
Ipswich River 
Kingston Harbor . 
Little Harbor, Woods Hole . 
Manchester Harbor 
Marblehead Harbor 
Marthas Vineyard Harbor . 
Powow River 
Rockport Harbor 
Scituate Harbor . 
Town River . 
Vineyard Haven Harbor 
Wareham Harbor 
Wellfleet Harbor . 
Westport Harbor and River 
Winthrop Harbor 
Woods Hole Channel . 
Totals . 



Recapitulation. 


Expenditures. 


Appropriations . 


Total of Table No. 1 

Total of Table No. 2 


$20,968,013 25 
1,269,311 63 


$21,470,097 90 
1,291,376 25 




$22,237,324 88 


$22,761,474 15 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



203 



Expenditures on Boston Harbor and its Tributaries to 

June 30, 1921. 

{The tributaries given are those now under improvement, and do not include tributaries hereto- 
fore improved.] 



Locality. 


Expenditures. 


Appropriations . 


Mystic River (below mouth of Island End River) 2 . 


$12,604,864 31 

\ 305,512 23 

149,891 55 


$12,675,827 58 
336,050 00 
149,950 00 


Totals 


$13,060,268 09 


$13,161,827 58 



1 Including Chelsea Creek. 



2 Now one improvement. 



204 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contracts made by the Department of Public Works, Division 

Year ending 



Con- 
tract 
No. 



Work. 



Contractor. 



Date. 



14 

17 
21 
22 



23 



24 



25 



26 



West Bay, Barnstable, dredging 

Acushnet River, dredging 

Winthrop Harbor, dredging . 
Third Cliff, Scituate, riprap . 
North Scituate, sea wall . 



Humarock Beach, Scituate, concrete 
sea wall. 



East Boston, dredging and filling 



East Boston, building bulkhead 



Dredging and riprap: 
Witchmere Harbor 
Oak Bluffs . 

Menamsha Creek . 

Falmouth Inner Harbor 
Wild Harbor, Falmouth 

Herring River 

Hyannisport 

Lake Anthony 

West Bay, Barnstable . 



Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 



Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 



Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 

Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 

Arthur J. Mitchell 



John Williams & Co. 



Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Com- 
pany. 



William L. Miller Company 



William E. Burke 



July 1, 1920 

Aug. 2, 1920 

Sept. 10, 1920 

Mar. 11, 1921 

Sept. 14, 1921 



May 27, 1921 



May 11, 1921 



May 11, 1921 



May 13, 1921 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



205 



of Waterways and Public Lands, and in Force during the 
Nov. 30, 1921. 



Condition of 
Work. 


Contract Prices. 


Amount 
paid during 
Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1921. 


Total 

paid to 

Nov. 30, 

1921. 


Estimated 
Amount of 
Contract. 


Completed Jan. 


Dredging, 78 cents per cubic yard, 


$20,263 39 


$27,661 14 


$31,200 00 


13, 1921. 


measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $20 per cubic yard. 








Completed Feb. 


Dredging, 52 cents per cubic yard, 


39,583 98 


112,180 54 


112,320 00 


19, 1921. 


measured in scows. Excavating 
boulders, $16 per cubic yard. 








Completed March 


Dredging, 47.9 cents per cubic yard, 


12,499 03 


12,499 03 


12,100 00 


26, 1921. 


scow measurement. 








Completed April 


For furnishing stone and deposit- 


21,527 98 


21,527 98 


15,000 00 


27, 1921. 


ing it in place, $5.80 per ton. 








In progress . 


For constructing new wall, $11 per 
cubic yard of concrete measured 
in completed work. For con- 
structing concrete footings under 
existing wall, $4 for each linear 
foot of completed footing. For 
excavating, placing and grading 
of material, $1 per cubic yard of 
material measured in place before 
excavating. 


5,840 71 


5,840 71 


13,375 00 


Completed Oct. 7, 


For furnishing materials and con- 


55,564 75 


55,564 75 


54,800 00 


1921. 


structing main wall and steps, 
$12.50 for each cubic yard of con- 
crete measured in completed 
work. For furnishing materials 
and constructing each spur jetty, 
$150 for each complete jetty 25 
feet in length. For furnishing 
material and constructing con- 
crete slab and cut-off wall at 
Marshfield Avenue, $400 for com- 
pleted work. 








In progress . 


Dredging areas at East Boston and 
depositing material, 32.94 cents 
per cubic yard. Dredging and 
depositing material brought from 
other portions of harbor, 22 cents 
per cubic yard. 


221,674 25 


221,674 25 


351,400 00 


Completed Aug. 


For building bulkhead with one 


56,157 08 


56,157 08 


56,000 00 


26, 1921. 


spur shore, $21.44 per lineal foot. 
For building bulkhead with two 
spur shores, $22.44 per lineal foot. 










Completed , 


f 










Wild Harbor, 




4,195 52 


4,195 52 


4,420 00 




July 29, 1921; 




- 


- 


7,425 00 




Witchmere, 




1 


- 


7,950 00 1 




Oct. 23, 1921; 




I 


- 


1,435 00 2 




Herring River, 




467 50 


467 50 


550 00 




Sept. 17, 1921; 




5,470 19 


5,470 19 


6,975 00 


■ 


Oak Bluffs sea 
wall, Oct. 23, 


■ Unit prices .... - 


| 7,539 72 1 


7,539 72 1 


7,570 00 J 
5,100 00 s 




1921; Fal- 




i 6,765 39 1 


6,765 39 » 


8,200 00 » 




mouth Inner 




I 


- 


2,250 00 4 




Harbor, Nov. 






- 


9,752 50 




9,1921. Work 
in progress in 




- 


- 


5,964 00 














other locali- 






$24,438 32 


$67,591 50 




ties. 


J 









1 Dredging. 



2 Jetty repairs. 



Riprap. 



4 Removing boulders. 



206 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Contracts made by the Department of Public Works, Division 

Year ending 



Con- 
tract 
No. 


Work. 


Contractor. 


Date. 


27 


Commonwealth Pier No. 5, South 
Boston, coal for heating plant. 


Metropolitan Coal Company . 


June 15, 1921 


28 


Battery Wharf, dredging opposite . 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


June 22, 1921 


29 


Fish Pier, South Boston, repaying 
a portion. 


B. E. Grant Company 


July 28, 1921 


30 


Wollaston Beach, dredging 


W. S. Rendle .... 


Aug. 1, 1921 


31 


Cottage Park, Winthrop, dredging . 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Aug. 30, 1921 


32 


Old Harbor, South Boston, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Aug. 30, 1921 


34 


Wild Harbor, Falmouth, and Nob- 
scusset Harbor, Dennis, break- 
water extension and repair. 


Calvin G. Fletcher . 


Aug. 15, 1921 


36 


Fresh Water Cove, Gloucester, 
dredging. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Aug. 15, 1921 


37 


Falmouth Inner Harbor, extending 
west jetty. 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Sept. 6, 1921 


38 


Bullock Street extension and Cypher 
Street paving. 


B. E. Grant Company 


Aug. 30, 1921 


39 


East Boston bulkhead 


William L. Miller Company 


Sept. 14, 1921 


40 


Taunton River, dredging 


Bay State Dredging and Con- 
tracting Company. 


Nov. 3, 1921 


41 


Oak Bluffs sea wall and Witchmere 
Harbor jetty, riprap protection. 


T. A. Scott Company, Inc. 


Nov. 18, 1921 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



207 



of Wateeways and Public Lands, and in Force during the 
Nov. 30, 1921 — Concluded. 



Condition of 
Work. 


Contract Prices. 


Amount 
paid during 

Year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 
1921. 


Total 

paid to 

Nov. 30, 

1921. 


Estimated 

Amount of 

Contract. 


Completed . 


$8.42 per gross ton .... 


$10,688 71 


$10,688 71 


- 


Completed Aug. 
30, 1921. 


Dredging between harbor line and 
main ship channel, 55 cents per 
cubic yard, scow measurement. 
Dredging in dock, 50 cents per 
cubic yard, scow measurement. 
Removing boulders, $20 per cubic 
yard. 


13,859 35 


13,859 35 


$12,420 00 


Completed Sept. 
27, 1921. 


Unit prices 


27,182 73 


27,182 73 


24,431 00 


Completed Nov. 
26, 1921. 


Dredging, 42.5 cents per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. Removing 
boulders, $3 per cubic yard. 


12,796 20 


12,796 20 


12,962 50 


Completed Oct. 
17, 1921. 


Dredging, 51 cents per cubic yard. 
Removing boulders, $15 per cubic 
yard. 


10,073 67 


10,073 67 


12,469 20 


Completed Oct. 
14, 1921. 


Dredging, 53 cents per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. Removing 
boulders, $15 per cubic yard. 


9,277 12 


9,277 12 


7,435 00 


Completed Nov. 
27, 1921. 


For furnishing and depositing 
stone in breakwater at Nobscus- 
set Harbor, $6 per ton. 

For furnishing stone and construct- 
ing extension to breakwater at 
Wild Harbor, $6 per ton. 


4,868 50 
9,623 77 


4,868 50 
9,623 77 


1 

| 16,800 00 

J 


Completed Sept. 
22, 1921. 


Dredging, 50 cents per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. Removing 
boulders, $12 per cubic yard. 


15,477 72 


15,477 72 


11,100 00 


Completed Oct. 
1, 1921. 


For furnishing and placing stone 
riprap and chips, $3.85 per ton. 


16,880 33 


16,880 33 


15,400 00 


In progress . 


Unit prices 


24,968 75 


24,968 75 


61,055 65 


In progress . 


$27.71 for each linear foot of com- 
pleted bulkhead. 


32,750 50 


32,750 50 


52,649 00 


In progress . 


Dredging, 72 cents per cubic yard, 
scow measurement. Removing 
boulders, $22 per cubic yard. 


2,512 46 


2,512 46 


23,040 00 


In progress . 


For furnishing and placing stone 
chips and riprap at Oak Bluffs, 
$6.45 per ton. For furnishing and 
placing stone chips at Witchmere 
Harbor, $6.95 per ton. 






8,535 00 



INDEX. 



Department of Public Works. 



Organization, under Chapter 16, General Laws 
Personnel ....... 

Recommendations for Legislation 

Division of Highways .... 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands 

Registry of Motor Vehicles . 



PAGE 

3 

4 

102-106 

102 

105, 106 

103, 104 



Division of Highways. 
Advertising Signs and Devices within the Public View . 

Rules and Regulations ...... 

Scenic Highways ...... 

Appropriations ........ 

Bridges ......... 

Alterations, Repairs and Extensions completed in 1921 

Built or contracted for ..... 

Contemplated Bridges and Structures . 

Examinations, etc., at Request of Cities and Towns 

Examinations, etc., in Accordance with Certain Legislation 

Examinations, etc., at Request of County Commissioners 

Examinations and Reports by Direction of the Department 

Merrimack River, between Newburyport and Salisbury 
Draw Openings ...... 

Plans, Studies or Estimates ..... 

Taunton Great River, between Fall River and Somerset 
Draw Openings ...... 

Construction and Repair of Ways not State Highways in Certain Towns 

Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns under Contracts made 

previous to 1921 

Co-operative Work, Supervision of Certain Expenditures by Cities, 

Towns and Counties . 
Expenditures, Summary for the Year 
Federal Aid in Constructing Highways 

Apportionments to Massachusetts 

Appropriations 

Federal Highway Act of 1921 

Legislation 

Mileage in Various Counties 

Projects . . 

Total Mileage of Road Projects 
General Statement as to Surveys, Plans, Estimates and Other Work 
during the Year .... 

Engineering Advice to Municipal Authorities 

Highways, Length of Construction, etc. 

Resurfacing and Widening of State Highways 

Roads constructed in 1921 . . . , 

State Highways ...... 

Surveys, Estimates and Designs . 

Trees on State Highways . . . , 



95 
96-99 
100 
9-14 
64 
65 
64 
65 
66 
67 
67 
68 
68 
68 
65 
69 
69 
82 

83 

16 

14, 15 

56 

59 

59 

107-115 

56-58 

60 

61-63 

63 

17 
18 
17 
18 
18 
17 
17 
18 



210 



INDEX. 



State 



High 



Highways 



Hearings ......... 

Highway Improvements authorized by Special Acts 

Contracts entered into during the Year for Town Ways 
Expenditures ....... 

Highways in the Five Western Counties 

Expenditures in Various Localities 
Maintenance and Improvement of Public Ways, exclusive of 
ways, in Certain Towns .... 

Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns 
Meetings ......... 

Permits ......... 

Petitions ......... 

Repair and Improvement of Public Ways, exclusive of State 
in Certain Towns 
Allotments by the State and Towns 
Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns 
Towns where Work has been contracted for 
State Aid in keeping Certain Highways open during the Winter Months 

Snow Fences erected . 
State Highways 

Appropriations . 
Care of Shade Trees 
Construction 

Completed during the Year .... 

Expenditures in Various Counties, Cities and Towns 
Construction and Resurfacing .... 

Contracts entered into during the Year . 
Expenditures during the Year .... 

Contract Prices in 1921 ..... 

Contracts signed during the Year .... 

Highways laid out or contracted for and Construction Expenditures 

to Dec. 1, 1921 

Maintenance ....... 

Average Expenditure per Mile in 1921, etc. 
Expenditures in Various Counties, Cities and Towns 
Resurfacing and Widening ..... 

Work done during the Year .... 

Town and County Ways, Construction and Repairs 
Contributions by the State, Towns and Counties 
Counties and Towns where Work has been contracted for 
Expenditures in Various Counties and Towns 
Type of Road and Length contracted for 



28, 



PAGE 
16 

52 
52 
52 

80 

80,81 

84 

84,85 

16 

18 

16,19 

86 

87-89 

90-93 

88,89 

94 

94 

19 

9 

136 

17 

18 

20 

22 

22 

22 

132-135 

16 

116-131 

36, 43-51 

44-51 

28,36 
18 
18 
70 
71 
71 
75 
71 



Registry of Motor Vehicles. 
Abstracts for Fiscal Years 1920 and 1921 
Aircraft . . . . 

Appropriated or available for 1921 
Conference of Motor Vehicle Administrators 
Court Records ..... 
Examination Places .... 
Examinations for Licenses . 
Examiners Work, 1919-21, inclusive 
Expenditures for the Fiscal Year 1921 . 
Fines paid in 1920 and 1921 
Headlighting ..... 



147 
155 
154 
146 
147 
149 
148 
149 
153 
148 
150 



INDEX. 



211 



Increase of Work ......... 

Inspectors .......... 

Investigations and Prosecutions, 1920-21 .... 

Motor Vehicle Deaths, Injuries, Collisions ..... 

Children killed and injured, Number in 1920 and 1921 

Collisions, Number in 1920 and 1921 

Persons killed and injured, Number in 1920 and 1921 

Persons killed and injured, 1914-21, inclusive 
Personnel of Examining and Investigating Section 
Receipts ........... 

Registrations, Deaths, Accidents, Suspensions, etc., Comparative State 

ment, 1908-21, inclusive 
Registrations, Licenses, Fees 

Passenger Cars, Commercial Vehicles and Motor Cycles, 1916-21 
inclusive .... 
Suspensions and Revocations 

According to Nature of Offences . 

Analysis ..... 

Number in 1920 and 1921 . 
Used-car Section , 

Volume of Work handled 



PAGE 

155 
147 
147 
141 
142 
142 
141 
146 
150 
152 

144 
151 

152 
142 
144 
143 
143 
150 
151 



Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Acushnet River .......... 

Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor 
Work, from 1893 to Nov. 30, 1921, inclusive, excepting Boston 
Harbor .......... 

Boston Harbor ........... 

Appropriations, Contributions and Expenditures for Improvement 
of Small Harbors and Channels within Boston Harbor, 1893 
to 1921, inclusive .... 

Battery W T harf Dredging . . 

Commonwealth Flats at East Boston 

Railroad Connections .... 

Commonwealth Flats at South Boston . 
Commonwealth Pier No. 5 . 
Commonwealth Pier No. 6 . 
Development of Land South of Summer Street 
South Bay ...... 

Cottage Park, Winthrop .... 

Expenditures for Development and Improvement in Boston Harbor 

1859-1921, inclusive 
Haywards Creek . 
Income 
Mystic River 
Old Harbor Dredging 
Port of Boston Fund 
Winthrop Harbor Dredging 
Wollaston Beach Dredging 
Conserving and equalizing the Flow of Water in Rivers and Streams 
Contracts made and pending during 1921 
Contributions and Expenditures for River and Harbor Work, Dec 

1920, to Nov. 30, 1921 
Ellisville Harbor, Plymouth 
Falmouth Heights Sea Walls 



169 



197 
159 



195 

164 

162 

163 

159 

159 

160, 

161 

161 

166 

193 
166 
192 
165 
165 
192 
165 
166 
181 
204 

196 
169 
170 



212 INDEX. 



PAGE 

Falmouth Inner Harbor ......... 170 

Federal Appropriations and Expenditures in Massachusetts Rivers and 

Harbors to June 30, 1921 201 

Financial Statement .......... 192 

Fish Weir Permits approved during the Year . . . . . 191 

Gloucester Harbor .......... 171 

Great Ponds 180 

Herring River, Harwich . . . . . . . . . 171 

Hyannisport Harbor .......... 172 

Income ............ 192 

Katama Bay, Edgartown ......... 172 

Lake Anthony ........... 173 

Licenses granted during the Year . . . . . . . 185 

Massachusetts Atlas Sheets and Town Boundary Atlases . . . 182 

Menamsha Inlet .......... 173 

Miscellaneous Permits granted during the Year . . . . . 191 

New Bedford State Pier 174 

Nobscusset Harbor .......... 175 

Oak Bluffs Sea Wall 175 

Province Lands .......... 182 

Receipts, 1921 192 

Re-establishment of Certain Triangulation Stations . . . . 183 

Rivers, Harbors, Tide Waters and Foreshores, exclusive of Boston Harbor 168 

Scituate Sea Walls .......... 176 

Glades 176 

Humarock Beach ......... 177 

Third Cliff 177 

Special Reports to the Legislature ....... 183 

Taunton River, Somerset ......... 177 

Waterways Fund .......... 192 

West Bay, Barnstable ......... 178 

Wild Harbor, Falmouth 178 

Witchmere Harbor .......... 179 



Public Document No. 54 



Cfte Commontoealtft of ®$a$mtbumt$ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1922 




Publication of this Document 

approved by the 

Commission on Administration and Finance 



BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Cf)e Commontoealtf) of 9^a00acf)U0ett0 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts. 

Pursuant to the provisions of law the third annual report of 
the Department of Public Works for the fiscal year ending 
Nov. 30, 1922, is submitted. 

The organization of the Department in two divisions is set 
forth in chapter 16 * of the General Laws. Section 6 of said 
chapter was amended by section 2 of chapter 534 of the Acts 
of 1922, as follows: — 

Except as otherwise provided by sections thirty-one and fifty-eight 
of chapter ninety and section sixty of chapter one hundred and forty, 
all rules and regulations within the jurisdiction of the division of highways 
or the division of waterways and public lands shall be drafted by the asso- 
ciate commissioners having charge of said division, shall be submitted to 
the commissioner and associate commissioners sitting as a board, and shall 
take effect when approved by them, and at such time as they shall desig- 
nate. Said board shall also have power to make all needful rules and regu- 
lations for earning out the provisions of law relating to the department. 

The personnel during the year ending Nov. 30, 1922, was as 
follows : — 

Commissioner of Public Works, Jokx N. Cole. - 

Division of Highways. 

Associate Commissioner, Frank D. Kemp. 3 
Associate Commissioner, James W. Syxax. 
Associate Commissioner, Frank E. Lyman. 4 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 
Associate Commissioner, Jesse B. Baxter. 
Associate Commissioner, Richard K. Hale. 

Executive Secretary for the Department, Frederick X. Wales. 

1 Printed in the report for 1921, page 3. 3 Resigned June 14, 1922. 

2 Died Oct. 18, 1922. * Appointed June 14, 1922. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 54. 



Division of Highways. 

Chief Engineer, Arthur W. Dean. 
Construction Engineer, Fra'nklin C. Pillsbury. 
District Engineers : — 

District No. 1, Berkshire County, George A. Curtis. 

District No. 2, 1 Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden counties, H. D. 
Phillips. 

District No. 3, - Hampden and Worcester counties, John A. Johnston. 

District No. 4, Middlesex County, F. D. Sabin. 

District No. 5, Essex and Suffolk counties, D. H. Dickinson. 

District No. 6, Norfolk and Bristol counties, R. W. Coburn. 

District No. 7, Plymouth, Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket counties, 
George H. Delano. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Mary A. Riley. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Fred Fair. 

Division of Waterways and Public Lands. 

Chief Engineer, Frank W. Hodgdon. 

Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for Boston Harbor, John N. Ferguson. 

Assistant to the Chief Engineer, for harbors and waterways outside 

Boston Harbor, Francis L. Sellew. 
Recording Secretary for the Division, Edna F. Townsend. 
Financial Secretary for the Division, Cora I. Allen. 

Bridge Engineer for the Department, William F. Williams. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles. 

Registrar, Frank A. Goodwin. 

Chief Clerk, Charles R. Gilley. 

Chief of Inspection Force, Albert S. Olsson. 

A detailed report is presented herewith, covering the activi- 
ties for the year of the Division of Highways, the Division of 
Waterways and Public Lands, and the Registry of Motor 
Vehicles. 

FREDERICK N. WALES, 
Acting Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dec. 1, 1922. 

1 With the exception of five towns, which are included in District No. 3. 

2 Including Brimfield, Holland, Monson, Palmer and Wales, those remaining being in District 
No. 2. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS. 



Appropriations. 

Chapter 129, Acts of 1922, making appropriations for the 
maintenance of departments, boards, commissions, institutions 
and certain activities of the Commonwealth, etc., is, in part, 
as follows : — 

Service of the Department of Public Works. 
Item 

623 For the salaries of the commissioner and the four associate 

commissioners, a sum not exceeding thirty-one thousand 

five hundred dollars S3 1,500 00 

624 For personal sen-ices of clerks and assistants to the commis- 

sioner, a sum not exceeding twelve thousand six hundred 

dollars 12,600 00 

625 For traveling expenses of the commissioner, a sum not exceed- 

ing fifteen hundred dollars ...... 1,500 00 

Total $45,600 00 

Division of Highways (the following appropriations for the 
operation and maintenance of this division, except as 
otherwise provided, are made from the receipts in the 
Motor Vehicle Fees Fund) : 

626 For the personal services of the chief engineer, engineers and 

office assistants, including certain clerks and stenographers, 

a sum not exceeding fifty-four thousand five hundred dollars $54,500 00 

627 For traveling expenses of the associate commissioners, when 

traveling in the discharge of their official duties, a sum not 

exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars .... 2,500 00 

628 For services other than personal, including printing the annual 

report and necessary office supplies and equipment, a sum 

not exceeding thirteen thousand five hundred dollars . . 13,500 00 

629 For the care, repair and storage, replacement and purchase of 

road-building machinery and tools, a sum not exceeding 

three hundred fifty thousand dollars .... 350,000 00 

630 For the suppression of gypsy and brown tail moths on state 

highways, a sum not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars . 15,000 00 

631 For the construction and repair of town and county ways, a 

sum not exceeding six hundred seventy-five thousand dollars 675,000 00 

632 For aiding towns in the repair and improvement of public ways, 

a sum not exceeding five hundred twenty-five thousand 

dollars 525,000 00 

633 For the maintenance and repair of state highways, a sum not 

exceeding two million two hundred thousand dollars, of 
which sum three hundred seventy-two thousand three hun- 
dred forty-nine dollars and thirty-seven cents represents the 
receipts from assessments upon certain cities and towns for 
the maintenance of state highways, and the balance from 
receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees Fund .... 2,200,000 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 54. 5 

Item 

634 For the maintenance and operation of the Xewburyport bridge 

and the Brightman street bridge in Fall River, in accordance 
with the provisions of existing laws, a sum not exceeding 
twenty thousand dollars 820,000 00 

Total 83,855,500 00 

Registration of Motor Vehicles: 

635 For personal services, a sum not exceeding three hundred forty- 

five thousand dollars, from receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees 

Fund $345,000 00 

636 For services other than personal, including traveling expenses, 

purchase of necessary supplies, equipment and materials, 
including cartage and storage of the same, and for work 
incidental to the registration and licensing of owners of 
motor vehicles, a sum not exceeding three hundred nine 
thousand dollars from receipts in the Motor Vehicle Fees 
Fund 309,000 00 

Total S654.000 00 

State Highways: 

637 For the purpose of enabling the department of public works to 

secure federal aid for the construction of highways, a sum 
not exceeding one million eight hundred thousand dollars 
in addition to any other funds which the department has 
available for the purpose. Of the said sum one million five 
hundr